Camry V6 SE opinions please

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2,698
Location
Silicon Valley
Do you really want the last year of the current Camry when the new 2007 Camry is just around the corner? Check out the spy photos first before you commit.
 
Messages
749
Location
Chicago
We have had '05 SE v6 for one year and 11k. Nice handling compare to '99 v6 LE. Quiet and solid.City driving I like to four speed trans(less shifts). The SE is great,Heated Leather seats,mooroof,Traction VSC antilock,side airbags for $24,600. From press and friends the Honda is faster and handles better.And gives good mpgs. I have never driven a Honda so I'm no help there. Always had Toyotas.
 

ebc

Messages
79
Location
Kingsport, TN
Hello, I hope all had a Merry Christmas. Any opinions on the V6 Camry SE (3.3L) appreciated. Compared to V6 Honda Accord (2006 versions)on handling, performance, mileage, maintenance, etc. Many thanks, ebc
 
Messages
326
Location
Southern Maine
ebc- Have you driven the Accord? If not, I'll bet you'll be sold on the Honda once you drive both. Both are good cars, however. Just curious, though - why do you need the V6? If you haven't driven the 2.4L VTEC Accord, you should drive it before you immediately pass on the 4 cylinder. Considerable savings, both on initial purchase, then on gas mileage as long as you own the car. No shortage of opinions here on BITOG, so this is only my opinion! Good luck, Steve
 

ebc

Messages
79
Location
Kingsport, TN
Thanks for the responses. Do most V6's use timing belts as opposed to chains? I read on another thread that the 06 Accords V6 appears to have no room for in car replacement of the belt. Those who want to run these care 200k or more are concerned. In reponse to another question; No, I have not ruled out an I4. My mid-life crisis pushes me towards more power. Regards, ebc
 
Messages
40,710
Location
Great Lakes
quote:
06 Accords V6 appears to have no room for in car replacement of the belt.
What does that mean? What's involved in replacing the belt then? As far as "do most V6s use timing belts vs. chains", for cost, size, and noise reasons, I think most manufacturers tend to go for the timing belts on their engines these days. The V6 on the Maxima used to have a chain. Not sure if they've changed it on the more recent ones.
 
Messages
77
Location
Atlanta
there is a review of the new accord v6/6sp sedan combo (previously, only 2-doors could have a stick) on Car & Driver. Looks like a pretty nice drive.
 
Messages
9,448
Location
USA
IF the price is right and you like the car get it. I would not worry about the next Camry platform at all. THe next platform is still going to be fwd just a bit larger. It will be based ont he platform used by the Avalon but will not be an Avalon clone in dimension or trim! It might not even have the larger newer V6 either. I have a 2003 Camry and I love it for what it is!It out handles my wifes Buick and will also out handle the Lacross. It also has more grip on the G-Pad then cars that are supposed to be sporty and performance oriented. My camry is so quite and rides so nice that I think would be hard for them to top it in any way that is discernable to the average consumer and keep the price low.
 
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11,360
Location
Florida, Cape Coral
I love my Subaru non-turbo and I just replaced the timing belt & water pump myself (3 hours and $127 using oem parts) The dealer said 5-$600 without the WP or 6-$700 with a new WP. The change interval on my Subaru is 105,000 miles but, most manufactures require a belt change at 60,000 miles. I consider required additional maintenence cost of 4-$700 not a good thing. Give me a roller chain running in oil like my 86 Saab. Going strong at 176,000 miles and my neighbor now has >210,000 on that great running vehicle. JMHO ed
 
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4,478
Location
Southern California
I've been perusing the Accord forums at Edmunds for months. I've seen no posts indicating the Accord's V6 has to be removed in order to replace the timing belt, though any of 'em are a job. The only current popular-priced midsize cars I'm aware of that use timing chains on their V6 motors are Nissan Altimas and Hyundai Sonatas. For anyone who fantasizes that overhead camshaft timing chains are good for the life of the car, carry on beautiful dreamer. Chains will eventually stretch beyond the limits of the auto-tensioner to compensate and they will fail - anytime after 150,000 miles is considered fair game. And they will cost more to replace than a belt will. If a chain breaks or jumps a sprocket in operation, the results of flailing steel in a confined space ain't pretty. (hint - steel is harder than aluminum...) On top of that, the hapless car owner still has the same additional damage of broken pistons and/or valves if his engine is an interference design. In short, there ain't no free lunch. (Now if some company would market a motor with silent helical-cut gears driving the overhead camshafts... [Wink] )
 

Bill in Utah

Staff member
Messages
12,849
Location
UT
I've had belts (1986 Jetta , 1998 Accord) and chains (1982 Toyota Truck, 2005 Corolla) and have hundreds of thousands of miles on both. I'll take a chain. Everytime. The 1982 Toyota truck is around 230k with no problems. The 1986 Jetta is over 250k no problems. The Jetta has required many belts where as the Toyota has not. More $$ down the maintenance drain. I've seen many chains last way longer than 150 k. I've seen alot of cars need MAJOR work when their belt snapped well before 150k. Honda is getting away from belts now on their 4 cyls (new civic is chain). Belts work well, but IMO, their is a higher risk of failure (esp in a interferance(sp) motor). I think Ray is correct, No need to lift or move the Accords motor to replace belts. Just alot of work! (in tight areas..) My Dads Honda powered Vue looks like it will be fun... I'll get to do it when it comes time.. [Roll Eyes] Happy New Year everyone! [Cheers!] Bill [Coffee]
 

JHZR2

Staff member
Messages
46,119
Location
New Jersey
Ray, In my 83 MB turbodiesel, I have barely one degree of "stretch", after 228k miles. MB sells offset woodruff keys to compensate for EIGHT degrees of "stretch". 150k is barely broken in if you know how to drive and treat an engine. JMH
 
Messages
10,898
Location
Nokesville, VA
Not an overhead cam engine, but the double-roller timing chain in my 1988 Mustang GT had no "stretch" and no discernable wear at all..and this at 170K miles. The sprockets didn't have any varnish or sludge buildup on them either. The timing chain was replaced because it had started leaking coolant through the timing cover, and once you're already in there to replace that gasket, it's another 15 minutes and $40 to change the timing chain. I expect that it is probably as much labor to change that gasket, the water pump, the thermostat, and the timing chain as it is to change a timing belt and waterpump on a V6 engine.
 
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