Brake line tube nuts question

Messages
24
Location
PA
I'm planning to replace the brake lines on my car due to rust and I've decided to use the Nicopp lines. The question I have is regarding the tube nuts. I can get steel ones locally but I'm worried they will rust. I see there are stainless steel ones on Amazon but wonder about the quality of them as they're most likely made in China. Other websites that have stainless steel ones are probably made in China also. Does anyone have a recommendation on where to get good quality stainless steel tube nuts? This is the one I've decided on unless someone has another suggestion?


Also, the Nicopp lines sold on Amazon aren't all equal in quality, correct? Anyone have a recommendation on which seller to buy from?
 
Messages
4,791
Location
Northern Ohio
I would just get treated steel ones or clean up your old ones. You likely will not have to deal with the brake lines for the remaining life of your vehicle. I just put a dab of grease on the tube nut where the line enters the fitting AFTER they are tightened.The fittings are somewhat costly and they do add up, whether you benefit from going the stainless or brass route remains to be seen, I don't think so.
 
Messages
16,044
Location
Upper Midwest
All NiCopp brand nickel-copper brake line is of the same quality unless it is counterfeit. There are cheap nickel-copper lines available online but if you stick to a reputable vendor that is selling the brand name product it will be identical. When I replaced all the brake and fuel lines on my old Accord last summer I bought everything from AGS since it was in stock and they had all the fittings I needed. If I recall correctly the fittings were black oxide steel.

And FWIW all the NiCopp brand I purchased was made in China. If you want something produced elsewhere then try Cunifer brand which is made in the U.K as far as I know.
 
Messages
25,132
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
I'm planning to replace the brake lines on my car due to rust and I've decided to use the Nicopp lines. The question I have is regarding the tube nuts. I can get steel ones locally but I'm worried they will rust. I see there are stainless steel ones on Amazon but wonder about the quality of them as they're most likely made in China. Other websites that have stainless steel ones are probably made in China also. Does anyone have a recommendation on where to get good quality stainless steel tube nuts? This is the one I've decided on unless someone has another suggestion?


Also, the Nicopp lines sold on Amazon aren't all equal in quality, correct? Anyone have a recommendation on which seller to buy from?

USA made are not cheap and the fitment may be limited to SAE.


Some of the China made are very decent and available in metrics. Like these.


For the lines go with AGS or Cunifer, I get mine from this vendor which is not too far away, the Cunifer is top shelf.

 

Astro14

$100 Site Donor
Staff member
Messages
12,286
Location
Virginia Beach
Chinese-made products can be as good or better than products made anywhere else in the world.
Agreed.

The question, however; is that particular set of nuts of good quality, or junk?

And there’s no real way to know from an Amazon listing.

Which is why I’m always interested in what Trav, or Cline, recommend. They’ve seen junk, and junk costs them money.
 
Messages
3,446
Location
Roanoke Virginia
I’d check with your parts store to see what they offer. I would want to look at them in person before buying regardless of country of origin. I’ve used brass and stainless before. No issues with either one rusting so far. Just don’t use compression fittings on them that’s a no no.
 
Messages
36,121
Location
ME
Consider potential next moves: You've installed nicopp line with ordinary steel tube nuts. Now what? Wait 10-15 years and they'll rust. So? The lines won't rust, so you don't need to replace them. The rubber hose you've connected to might fail somehow, but, it, too, has ordinary steel threads.

So cut off the line an inch up, slide a new nut on it, flare it and replace the hose.

I'd use ordinary line nuts and smear a glob of grease on them once installed, including packing it "down the hole" where the line goes, then never worry again.

BTW, I've had a few 15 year old beaters where I've cut off the rusted line, jammed a 6 pt socket on the nut, hit it with PB blaster, got it out, wire brushed it, cleaned things with brake cleaner, and been able to reuse said nut. Often, it's out of desperation because they use all different sizes and threads, particularly at the master cylinder, and I don't want to hunt them down all over town. If the threads are there and the arbor part that jams down on the flare is still shaped correctly, and there are enough flats to grip to torque the thing, the nut is fine.
 

JC1

Messages
5,526
Location
Oshawa, Ontario Canada
I'm planning to replace the brake lines on my car due to rust and I've decided to use the Nicopp lines. The question I have is regarding the tube nuts. I can get steel ones locally but I'm worried they will rust. I see there are stainless steel ones on Amazon but wonder about the quality of them as they're most likely made in China. Other websites that have stainless steel ones are probably made in China also. Does anyone have a recommendation on where to get good quality stainless steel tube nuts? This is the one I've decided on unless someone has another suggestion?


Also, the Nicopp lines sold on Amazon aren't all equal in quality, correct? Anyone have a recommendation on which seller to buy from?
Are you flaring your own lines? Make sure you have a good flaring tool. I picked this one up this summer and worked like a champ. I had no success with those cheap flare tools from places like Harbor Freight. Also get yourself something to bend the lines such as tube bending pliers.

 

racerviii

Thread starter
Messages
24
Location
PA
Agreed.

The question, however; is that particular set of nuts of good quality, or junk?

And there’s no real way to know from an Amazon listing.

Which is why I’m always interested in what Trav, or Cline, recommend. They’ve seen junk, and junk costs them money.

Thank you! This is my exact concern. Without actually seeing the nuts in question, I can't tell whether they're junk or not.
I do know that compression fittings are a no-no regardless of their composition. I imagine that if they were a no-no, AGS would not sell them for brake line use. Please see this link and read the description.


Yes, I was thinking the same. If brass shouldn't be used, they wouldn't be selling them. And I could only find brass unions and not steel ones except for on Amazon. But still, I would prefer not to use brass.
Are you flaring your own lines? Make sure you have a good flaring tool. I picked this one up this summer and worked like a champ. I had no success with those cheap flare tools from places like Harbor Freight. Also get yourself something to bend the lines such as tube bending pliers.


Yes, I was looking to get this. It seems like it works without much difficulty. I've never had success with those cheaper tools either and broke every one of them. The Mastercool hydraulic one is the ultimate flaring tool but way too expensive for such a seldom job.
 
Last edited:

JC1

Messages
5,526
Location
Oshawa, Ontario Canada
Thank you! This is my exact concern. Without actually seeing the nuts in question, I can't tell whether they're junk or not.


Yes, I was thinking the same. If brass shouldn't be used, they wouldn't be selling them. And I could only find brass unions and not steel ones except for on Amazon. But still, I would prefer not to use brass.


Yes, I was looking to get this. It seems like it works without much difficulty. I've never had success with those cheaper tools either and broke every one of them. The Mastercool hydraulic one is the ultimate flaring tool but way too expensive for such a seldom job.
Thank you! This is my exact concern. Without actually seeing the nuts in question, I can't tell whether they're junk or not.


Yes, I was thinking the same. If brass shouldn't be used, they wouldn't be selling them. And I could only find brass unions and not steel ones except for on Amazon. But still, I would prefer not to use brass.


Yes, I was looking to get this. It seems like it works without much difficulty. I've never had success with those cheaper tools either and broke every one of them. The Mastercool hydraulic one is the ultimate flaring tool but way too expensive for such a seldom job.
The other thing I did before flaring the new lines was to take pieces of the old lines and cut them into smaller pieces and use those to teach myself how to make flares with the tool. This saves you from potentially wasting new line.
 
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