Adding an Oil Cooler to a 20 HP V-Twin Briggs

JTK

Joined
Aug 14, 2003
Messages
13,744
Location
Buffalo, NY
Before Pete's done with his new Simplicty, he'll have an auxiliary 6 pack oil filter module installed, cooler system and 5gal aux. oil sump! Seriously Pete, it's a good and beneficial concept given the right conditions. I know of Kohler Command powered Cub Cadet owners who have installed the Kohler kit, but you change your oil once a week anyway. Joel
 

Pete591

Thread starter
Joined
Jul 20, 2008
Messages
931
Location
Michigan
 Originally Posted By: JTK
Before Pete's done with his new Simplicty, he'll have an auxiliary 6 pack oil filter module installed, cooler system and 5gal aux. oil sump! Seriously Pete, it's a good and beneficial concept given the right conditions. I know of Kohler Command powered Cub Cadet owners who have installed the Kohler kit, but you change your oil once a week anyway. Joel
I know... ;\) Still debating. The simplest way to lower bearing temperature is using lower-viscosity oil. Thinking about a synthetic 5W-30 or 5W-20 if I get a cooler. Anybody ever use a 5W-20 in a mower? http://machinedesign.com/article/here-is-how-to-keep-sleeve-bearings-cool-0421 When equipment relies on sleeve or journal bearings, the lower the operating temperature, the better. Cooler running extends oil life, reduces differential thermal expansion of the journal, and causes fewer alignment problems. So taking steps to bring down the operating temperature is sometimes necessary and often desirable for oilfilm bearings. Engineers have a number of means at their disposal to cool bearings and reduce friction, resulting in lower temperatures. I did find the perfect fan oil cooler however! It's 4" X 6" and about 4" deep. It would be easy to install! http://www.hrpworld.com/index.cfm?form_prod_id=781,776,587_6038&action=product
 
Last edited:

JTK

Joined
Aug 14, 2003
Messages
13,744
Location
Buffalo, NY
Pete I'm with you that it's important to dissipate the heat, but you still need to find the happy medium of that and film thickness. Especially in a small, hard working air cooled engine. Joel
 
Joined
Dec 21, 2003
Messages
12,385
Location
Northern CA
It's hard to go wrong with factory recommended SAE viscosity and 190F to 220F oil. Something to keep in mind about the Machine Design article is that it's for industrial journal bearings which are usually designed to run at lower temperatures than automotive bearings. The cooler you can run a journal bearing in a piece of industrial machinery, the better off you are as long as you use the right viscosity. In an internal combustion engine, you want sump temperatures of at least 190F to get rid of moisture and other combustion products in the oil.
 
Top