3 step paint correction

mosaud1998

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202
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Chicago, IL
I looked at one of these last night, I dont believe the black paint is clear coated on the B pillar. You have to be extra careful with this black paint, hand only.
That's an eyesore too. Idk I think I'll just stick with waxing the cars and just using Mother's ceramic spray for right now. The whole paint correction thing kind of makes washing the car more of a pain. Like, you just gotta be more cautious after. Not that I am not cautious right now. But, I'll probably not want to wash it myself because I might bring back the swirl marks and whatnot. That's more money in the detailers pocket lol. Might just get the B-pillars buffed (I tried buffing it myself but they look the same) and then getting the interior trim on the Mercedes buffed.
 
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2,095
Location
Tinton Falls NJ
I am planning on getting a 3 step paint correction and buffing the piano black B-Pillar to get rid of swirl marks/Scratches on two of my cars. I have a silver 2009 BMW (waxed and clayed at least twice a year and garage kept) that was "paint corrected" almost 1.5 years ago. I paid the guy $200. Brought the car home the same day, direct sunlight hit the paint and I still saw the swirl marks. Then I have a 2018 Mercedes E-class in a very rate brown color(waxed a few months ago and garage kept since I brought it) that I brought from the dealership last year. Of course, it was ran through the dealership wash since the car washes are free. I am planning on getting both cars paint corrected, getting the gloss black B-pillar trim buffed and for the Mercedes, the rosewood gloss wood trim buffed along with the piano black center console trim. I have a few concerns before I go ahead and have both the cars paint corrected. First is, the guy is charging me $45/hr to do the work. He said it'll take him somewhere between 9 hours or less to do each car. Is that enough time to do the job? The second thing that most worries me is, I was reading online and some articles were saying that paint correction removes a layer of the clear coat. Down the road, will I have issues with the clear coat peeling? Is there any other type of wax or sealant I'll have to apply after the car is paint corrected? The guy that's doing the job said he'll be applying a sealant that should last 1 year. Will I have to do any clay bar and waxing after? The last thing I am worried about is the swirl marks returning after 6 months. I don't want to pay the guy $800-$900 to paint correct both cars then find out the swirl marks are back. What would you guys suggest?
1. Unless I missed detailed pictures, no one responding to this thread, even me, cannot tell you what your car really needs.

2. If someone [credible] is saying you need a 3 step correction your paint must be in really bad shape.

3. I'm only a detailing hobbyist but I'd be hard pressed to do a 3 step correction on an E-class sized car in 9 hours and do a good job (clean wheels, body wash incl. jambs, body decon, body wash, clay, corr. step 1, corr. step 2, corr. step 3, body wash. Do I understand that this guy isn't going to apply any LSP, only correct the paint? If that's the case you'll want a ceramic coating or a quality paint sealant (don't listen to the Nu Finish dinosaurs). Not saying this guy can't do it but it's a big job.

4. Swirls in your paint come almost exclusively from your wash process. If you do it right (two bucket method, microfiber mitts, dedicated mitts (wheels only, flats only, sides only), touchless drying whenever practical) you should be able to go LITERALLY YEARS before noticeable swirls appear. I'd also refrain from claying your car unless you need to polish because clay is mildly abrasive and WILL mar your paint. Instead of claying, your twice per year decontamination should be chemical (iron remover, tar remover) and NOT mechanical (clay).
 

mosaud1998

Thread starter
Messages
202
Location
Chicago, IL
1. Unless I missed detailed pictures, no one responding to this thread, even me, cannot tell you what your car really needs.

2. If someone [credible] is saying you need a 3 step correction your paint must be in really bad shape.

3. I'm only a detailing hobbyist but I'd be hard pressed to do a 3 step correction on an E-class sized car in 9 hours and do a good job (clean wheels, body wash incl. jambs, body decon, body wash, clay, corr. step 1, corr. step 2, corr. step 3, body wash. Do I understand that this guy isn't going to apply any LSP, only correct the paint? If that's the case you'll want a ceramic coating or a quality paint sealant (don't listen to the Nu Finish dinosaurs). Not saying this guy can't do it but it's a big job.

4. Swirls in your paint come almost exclusively from your wash process. If you do it right (two bucket method, microfiber mitts, dedicated mitts (wheels only, flats only, sides only), touchless drying whenever practical) you should be able to go LITERALLY YEARS before noticeable swirls appear. I'd also refrain from claying your car unless you need to polish because clay is mildly abrasive and WILL mar your paint. Instead of claying, your twice per year decontamination should be chemical (iron remover, tar remover) and NOT mechanical (clay).
Yeah I was reading post about the mechanical clay bar. Shouldn’t use it unless you really feel contamination on the paint. Idk if I want to get either car paint corrected/high speed buffed at this point. I think I'll just stick with waxing the cars and just using Mother's ceramic spray for right now. The whole paint correction thing kind of makes washing the car more of a pain. Like, you just gotta be more cautious after. Not that I am not cautious right now. But, I'll probably not want to wash it myself because I might bring back the swirl marks and whatnot. That's more money in the detailers pocket lol. Might just get the B-pillars buffed (I tried buffing it myself but they look the same) and then getting the interior trim on the Mercedes buffed.
 
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23,053
Location
CA
Yeah I was reading post about the mechanical clay bar. Shouldn’t use it unless you really feel contamination on the paint. Idk if I want to get either car paint corrected/high speed buffed at this point. I think I'll just stick with waxing the cars and just using Mother's ceramic spray for right now. The whole paint correction thing kind of makes washing the car more of a pain. Like, you just gotta be more cautious after. Not that I am not cautious right now. But, I'll probably not want to wash it myself because I might bring back the swirl marks and whatnot. That's more money in the detailers pocket lol. Might just get the B-pillars buffed (I tried buffing it myself but they look the same) and then getting the interior trim on the Mercedes buffed.
Polish the B-Pillars and have them wrapped in PPF.
 
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3,031
Location
Florida
This is why I try not to let anyone touch my vehicles. I have been having good results using Maguiars 205 and either a ceramic coating or acrylic like Klasse SG. Too many bad things can happen by those that don't care.
 
Messages
2,095
Location
Tinton Falls NJ
Yeah I was reading post about the mechanical clay bar. Shouldn’t use it unless you really feel contamination on the paint. Idk if I want to get either car paint corrected/high speed buffed at this point. I think I'll just stick with waxing the cars and just using Mother's ceramic spray for right now. The whole paint correction thing kind of makes washing the car more of a pain. Like, you just gotta be more cautious after. Not that I am not cautious right now. But, I'll probably not want to wash it myself because I might bring back the swirl marks and whatnot. That's more money in the detailers pocket lol. Might just get the B-pillars buffed (I tried buffing it myself but they look the same) and then getting the interior trim on the Mercedes buffed.
Your contradictions are a bit puzzling. You have a car someone is telling you needs a 3 step correction and you want to improve your finish. Now you're not sure you want to proceed because you don't want to wash it yourself and mess it up? But don't worry, those B-pillars will be shiny.

Using the two bucket method and a couple different mitts is easy to do and in that sense YOU ARE the #1 line of defense for preserving your car's finish. It will be a one-time cost of about $35 and it probably only adds 3-4 minutes to a wash (including set up and clean up). Surrendering that control to someone else or a car wash likely isn't going to help your cause.
 
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