205/65R15

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3,933
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Somewhere in the US
There will be a placard on your vehicle that lists the original tire size and the proper inflation pressure for that size. Placards are usually located on a doorpost or in the glove box. According to my book a 2001 Toyota Camry came with a couple of different tire sizes, but the ones with P205/65R15's have a placard value of 32 psi front and rear. But my book is for US models and since you spelled the word "tyres", I suspect my book is not applicable. Nevertheless, I prefer a bit more pressure to get better fuel economy, tire wear, tire durability, steering crispness, wet traction, snow traction and only give up a bit of ride harshness.
 
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1,251
Location
Austin, TX
quote:
...Nevertheless, I prefer a bit more pressure to get better fuel economy, tire wear, tire durability, steering crispness, wet traction, snow traction and only give up a bit of ride harshness.
I always thought snow traction will improve with lower PSI? But again we have a snow day once every 10 years, sleet maybe once every 3 years.
 
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3,933
Location
Somewhere in the US
quote:
Originally posted by Jonny Z: ....I always thought snow traction will improve with lower PSI? But again we have a snow day once every 10 years, sleet maybe once every 3 years....
There are 2 situations: 1) The tire never gets down to the road surface and "floats" on the layer of snow. In this case, yes, lower pressure would be better. 2) The usual situation: where using a higher inflation pressure improves the tire's ability to penetrate through the snow (or slush) to get to the pavement, but once it does, the pavement has much, much better traction than the snow by itself.
 
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40,659
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Great Lakes
Higher pressure = better tire wear? What about the claims that higher pressure will lead to uneven tire wear, ie. the center tread wears quicker than the sides?
 
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3,933
Location
Somewhere in the US
quote:
Originally posted by Quattro Pete: Higher pressure = better tire wear? What about the claims that higher pressure will lead to uneven tire wear, ie. the center tread wears quicker than the sides?
Higher pressure increases the overall stiffness of a tire. That reduces the wear rate. The shape of the tread of a radial tire is relatively insensitive to pressure increases, so the net effect (IMHO) is that a bit more inflation pressure improves the wear rate faster than the distortion of the tread leads to uneven wear. Put another way, even though the tread may wear unevenly, it still wears slower.
 
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1,899
Location
Columbia, SC
quote:
Originally posted by Quattro Pete: Higher pressure = better tire wear? What about the claims that higher pressure will lead to uneven tire wear, ie. the center tread wears quicker than the sides?
I used to run higher than OEM (+3 to +5 PSI) in my patrol cars. I would usually wear the centers due to the high speed driving. I run a +3 at x degrees set up now and have very even treadwear. I currently have approx 25K on a set of Goodyear Eagle F1's and expect to get 5-10K more using this "formula".
 

toyota62

Thread starter
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914
Location
Australia
Toyota recommending 29 psi which is too low I think. good comfortable ride but tyres wont last. 35 psi seems be doing well.
 
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48
Location
OP, KS
Most car makers err on the side of comfort rather than tire wear. A majority of cars I work on wear the edges faster than the center at the specified pressure. I always like to +5 to even out the treadwear, depending on the vehicle. Just a little trial and error on my vehicles until I find the pressure they like best.
 
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Location
earth
35 psi seems to be the old rule of thumb. My 05 camry, which is heavy, I think 30 psi per the door jamb just isn't enough.
 
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277
Location
Ga
Heat makes for more tire wear due to outgassing. Higher pressures reduce tire flex and heat, which reduces wear.
 
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15,814
Location
NE,Ohio
Originally Posted By: crinkles
35 psi seems to be the old rule of thumb. My 05 camry, which is heavy, I think 30 psi per the door jamb just isn't enough.
way to go forum topic architect at work from 2006 :{
 
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2,270
Location
Chicago IL
My '02 Avalon has that exact size and specs 31 psi. I've gone a couple pounds more before long interstate travel and it seems to work well.
 
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1,187
Location
Australia
My Toyota Rav4 states 29psi also, but the tyre shop put 38psi in them! I dropped it back to 31. I have an old Ford with 205/65/15 and they state 30psi unloaded but the sholders will wear off the front tyres at that pressure so I run more.
 
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