2011 VW Golf TDI. An update.

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Scdevon

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Originally Posted By: FowVay
Three thousand more for the engine alone? Are you sure you're apples to apples? Changing a particulate filter every 40,000 miles? Is that written someplace? Only a dealership can change the fluid in a direct shift gearbox? Wow! The TDI is so misunderstood...
So true. My manual says to INSPECT the particulate filter at 120k miles. The system uses pressure differential sensors to monitor the particulate filter and to perform regen cycles as it accumulates stored particles. Even if a DPF is toast (clogged) and doesn't respond to regen cycles they can be refurbished (baked out in an oven). Over the road diesel truck DPF's get refurbished all the time successfully. An automatic transmission in a TDI? Ugh. No way. You don't need to service it at a dealer, though. My tires (Conti) say 51 psi max on the sidewalls. I experiment with 45 psi because it gives an instant boost to mpg. You have to be careful to monitor the center of the tread for wear, though and you also have to be careful about reduced traction due to reduced contact area. VW recommends 38 psi or so. This is to give a balance of fuel economy, ride quality and tire wear. Relying on a VW dealer to do routine maintenance and then paying a dealer to do maintenance is a worst case scenario to me. I'm a gearhead with German car experience. I'm an ASE master technician with LS1 certification although I'm not in the auto repair business anymore. I also own a VCDS scanner/software along with all of my own tools so I feel that I'm pretty well equipped to maintain this TDI myself. I've also owned VW Diesels before which is a big plus.
 
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Scdevon

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Originally Posted By: Spector
The diesel costs $3,000 more than the gas equivalent.
The TDI package includes more than the engine itself. You're right, though. You have to view a TDI as a hobby. Buying a TDI and expecting to come out money ahead is a bit unrealistic.
 
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My coworker has a 2001 Jetta with 350K. The other day I asked him what his fuel milage is and he told me 43 mpg. Pretty [censored] good.
 
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Originally Posted By: Spector
That is according the sales person, apples to apples the diesel engine costs 3000 more ( sticker prices confirm it) . Yes, the maintenance is detailed in the owners manual, he found one for me to peruse and those mileage numbers are correct for the auto trans fluid change and particulate filter. THis is for the auto trans not the manual stick shift
no actually the TDI package is buried under luxury. If you want a TDI it will be equipped. pony up the gas car the same and the difference is about $1000. I just recently passed 45K on my TDI. Lets say I averaged 45mpg, which I do. lets say the gas car gets 30mpg which the sticker says it does. if we figure average fuel cost is $3 gas and $3.40 D, I am ahead by $1100 so far. My last one I kept 150K and got it before D went higher than Gas (which in itself is an abomidation unto the lord). I was gravy after 70K on that car. Plus the D will go 300K if you are so inclined. at the miles I drive, thats only 6 years.
 

Scdevon

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Do-it-yourself maintenance is a must or any cost savings goes right out the window. Replacing filters, fluids and timing belts is pretty easy. Stick to original German VW filters and parts and everything will be fine. I prefer to avoid dealers at all costs. Invest in the tools and literature and do everything yourself. It isn't that hard. Quad is right. The TDI package includes a lot of options. Since I needed a new car anyway, I decided to buy a fuel efficient VW Diesel. The way I figure it, Diesel fuel would have to cost $1.30 more a gallon before there would no longer be an advantage to owning a TDI Diesel over an equally equipped gas fueled car.
 

Scdevon

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Originally Posted By: Spector
auto transmission fluid change (required every 40,000 miles on the dual clutch auto transmission) and only a dealer can do it as it is sealed and requires special tools, is close to $500
http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=169356 The DSG (automatic) transmission service thread your VW dealer doesn't want you to see. About as easy as an engine oil change. I would never own one of these automatic beasties, but clearly, this service isn't worth $500 bucks. The DSG fluid is expensive, though. Even if you don't own a VagCom (not really necessary if you can guesstimate when the trans oil temperature has reached 113 degrees F) and had to buy one, you would be money ahead on your very first DSG tranny service.
 
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WOW, somewhat messier than my old Isuzu that had a fill and drain plug but the fill plug was on the sump but higher up. a lot to be aid for the stick shift on this one. Does the manual transmission require gear oil changes and are they just as bad to perform?
 
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I think the particulate filter that is required to be replaced at 40,000 miles is actually the cabin interior filter. Funny how these things get carried away. The manual 6-speed gearbox does not have a recommended fluid drain interval but I do mine at 50,000 miles just for the fun of it. It's a simple drain and refill procedure.. nothing special. Years of owning VW diesels (current is a common-rail TDI) has taught me that they're no different than any other vehicle for maintenance. I just believe that most vehicles don't necessarily get the service that their manufacturer asks for. VW's will demand attention from their owner sooner or later. Would I buy a DSG equipped VW? No.
 
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Originally Posted By: Spector
Does the manual transmission require gear oil changes and are they just as bad to perform?
Yes, although VW may not put that in writing. Consensus is about every TB job (100k average). Very easy to do with the correct socket. Older models use a 17mm hex, newer ones have a 12 sided jobber the size of which I don't know off hand.
 
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Originally Posted By: Scdevon
Originally Posted By: Spector
auto transmission fluid change (required every 40,000 miles on the dual clutch auto transmission) and only a dealer can do it as it is sealed and requires special tools, is close to $500
Even if you don't own a VagCom (not really necessary if you can guesstimate when the trans oil temperature has reached 113 degrees F)...
I've heard of people using cheap infrared thermometers for this. Also heard of people simply putting in the exact amount that they drained (temp measurement is just to make sure the right amount of fluid was put in, for those that don't know). I had my DSG fluid and filter changed by an Indy VW specialist for $225. Later on he mentioned something about underquoting that so maybe in the future they would charge more, dunno. It's a reputable shop that charges you what they quoted no matter how long it takes etc.
 

Scdevon

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I don't see what the big deal is about the DSG service. The fluid is expensive, but the service itself is easier than dropping the oil pan on a conventional American automatic transmission and changing the filter and fluid. Having said that, I would never own a DSG gearbox. I test drove one. It's the most God-awful "automatic shifting" (since it's really an automatic shifting manual transmission) transmission I've ever driven. Even if I lived in an area with heavy traffic, I'd still have the 6 speed manual. You can replace a clutch, pressure plate and flywheel yourself in an afternoon if you wear it out.
 

Scdevon

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Originally Posted By: FowVay
I think the particulate filter that is required to be replaced at 40,000 miles is actually the cabin interior filter. Funny how these things get carried away.
Indeed. Never underestimate the amount of misinformation on the interweb. DPF's (Diesel particulate filters) can be reconditioned very inexpensively. Soot turns to ash. Ash cannot be burned. Ash accumulates in the filter and needs to be cleaned out eventually with high pressure air, fluids, or both when on-vehicle regenerations no longer work. VW does not even call for a DPF inspection until 120,000 miles. It's unlikely that a DPF would ever need to be replaced. Maybe a cleaning in the 150,000 to 200,000 mile range.
 
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Originally Posted By: ChiTDI
Originally Posted By: Spector
Does the manual transmission require gear oil changes and are they just as bad to perform?
Yes, although VW may not put that in writing. Consensus is about every TB job (100k average). Very easy to do with the correct socket. Older models use a 17mm hex, newer ones have a 12 sided jobber the size of which I don't know off hand.
Agreed about the auto trannies. Americans have been BRAINWASHED into believing that they NEED an automatic. Learning how to drive a stick is very very easy if you are taught using the correct methods. [i]Auto slushbox, and DSG or any self shifting tranny is 1) More expensive during initial purchase. Much more often times. 2) More prone to trouble no matter how well you maintain them 3) More costly to maintain ( often times manual and clutch never need service for over 150k miles if not abused) 4)Give a bit less mpgs 5) Give the driver LESS control and ability to navigate during winter weather. Remember that any VW manual tranny sold in the USA since 1995 has used fully synthetic oil in the manual gear box so as long as it is not abused it will easily last 150k or more miles without any attention at all.
 
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I think the faults people find with the DSG during a test drive is due to the gearbox not being adapted to their driving style. Being driven by numerous people, all with a different style, leads to a DSG with a personality disorder. As for not running a diesel with an auto, I think you'll find that the power-band of a diesel suits an automatic transmission far better than that of a small gasoline engine. Regarding the experience of shifting a manual, yes, it can be enjoyable if you're a recreational player. But, once you've done it 1,000+ times a day, for more days than you care to remember, believe me when I tell you that that khrap gets old...
 
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Actually I will venture to say that today's automatics get better MPG than the ave manual due to shifting a lot better on average at more efficient RPMs than the average driver of a manual tranny. Not true years ago but I believe they are very close if not better in the mpg category now. Let's face it, people are just not as efficient as machines. I also have a 6 spd, fund to drive but if I had to battle commuter traffic every day driving the 6 spd, well, just not worth it IMO. There are days when one just does not want to think about RPMS, downshifting, lugging etc
 
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You should get the new ECM update for the car performed, if you haven't already done so. It's supposed to improve driveability.
 

rcy

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Originally Posted By: Vizzy
[i]Auto slushbox, and DSG or any self shifting tranny is 4)Give a bit less mpgs
Not in all cases. There are auto trannies that get better MPG than manual.
 
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Originally Posted By: rcy
Not in all cases. There are auto trannies that get better MPG than manual.
A manual transmission still wastes less energy than a any automatic with a hydraulic pump and a torque converter. The reason why some recent cars get better MPG with automatics is due to a taller top gear. Thus the engine runs at a lower speed when cruising the highway, and thus the engine is more efficient. An easy example is a 2006+ Honda Civic. Ask Civic owners what their engine speed is at 70mph and compare automatic to manual. If Honda gave the manual transmission version the same net top gear ratio it would definitely beat the automatic in the highway MPG competition. The manual beats the automatic at city MPG even though the automatic can be programmed better than most drivers. I can only imagine the automatic loses here due to the torque converter.
 
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