2006 Audi A4 3.2 - Oil Recommendation

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Hi all, I’m wondering if you might recommend for me an oil to use for my upcoming oil change. I’ve not changed the oil myself in this car before, and I don’t know what the shop I’ve been taking it to has been using. Here are the relevant details. 1. The car is a 2006 Audi A4 3.2 Quattro Avant with 83,000 miles. 2. Owner’s manual says 5W-40 is recommended, but 5W-30 and 0W-40 are also acceptable, and oil needs to meet VW 502 00. I plan to change the oil every 5000 miles. 3. I live in Chicago. 4. I tend not to drive very hard, mainly because I usually drive in city traffic. On the trips I mention below, I tend to sit around 80 or 85 for a couple hours at a time. 5. My daily drives are pretty short (3-6 miles each way) and in city traffic. Every 2 or 3 months though, I have trips that are 600-1000 miles each way. Don’t know if that’s an important consideration. 6. The car has no known issues, though I did notice that I had to add a quart of oil after a 2000 mile road trip, 4000 miles after my most recent oil change. I’m not sure if that’s relevant though. Pretty confident it’s not a leak. Long story short immediately after I bought the car a year and a half ago, we found that it had a rear main seal leak. In the process of fixing that, the shop also replaced a bunch of stuff that commonly leaks in cars of this type and age, including the intake manifold gasket and valve cover gaskets. I was planning to use Liqui Moly Leichtlauf High Tech 5W-40 (I’ve not seen anything negative about it), though I’m not wed to that and I’m open to other suggestions. Thanks for your help.
 

JC1

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I would try liqui moly motor oil saver for any leaks. Start with a 5w-40. You might go through too much 0w-40 if the leaks aren't fixed.
 
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Any 502 will do smile I like the Mag1 5w40 because it comes in clear bottles smile But there are certainly other good 502 oils at a good price! So just pick up whichever one is on sale at the best price and meets 502 standards
 
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You will be hard pressed to find a better 502 00 oil than Castrol 0W-40. Frequently on sale at WM for ~$23 a jug. I just posted a UOA of it in my X5. Needless to say it performed very well, again.
 
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tgdb9

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Thanks for the responses. It seems like some type of 0w-40 has been recommended a few times. Other than Chicago winters, is there any particular reason I should be using that instead of a 5w-40? (Sorry if that's a dumb question.)
 
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Mobil 1 and Castrol 0W-40 are simply super easy to find and inexpensive - that's why they get recommended. They're also top of the class.
 

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Originally Posted By: Oildudeny
Mobil 1 5w-40 spring thru summer switch to 0w-40 fall thru winter
Which M1 5w40 ? Formula M ? I had to order that online and was a bit expensive …
 
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To meet the VW 502 spec, look for "European formula" oils. VW 502 should be specified on the back of the bottle. Suggest going to Walmart and just buying either Mobil 1 or Castrol Edge, whichever is available amd/or cheapest. Either 5W40 or 0W40 will be fine in Chicago.
 
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Originally Posted By: tgdb9
Thanks for the responses. It seems like some type of 0w-40 has been recommended a few times. Other than Chicago winters, is there any particular reason I should be using that instead of a 5w-40? (Sorry if that's a dumb question.)
It won't make any difference. What you need is an oil that carries VW 502 00, after that the grade is largely irrelevant. Do like everyone is saying, go to Walmart and buy either M1 0W-40 or Castrol 0W-40. There's no point in spending more on a boutique brand like Liqui Moly as you'll get no benefit from doing so. I personally like the Castrol product because it still has Longlife-01 certification but both the Castrol and the M1 have the certification your engine requires.
 
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Originally Posted By: knerml
To meet the VW 502 spec, look for "European formula" oils. VW 502 should be specified on the back of the bottle. Suggest going to Walmart and just buying either Mobil 1 or Castrol Edge, whichever is available amd/or cheapest. Either 5W40 or 0W40 will be fine in Chicago.
You are very correct in advising a European spec'd oil for cars built there. Our API rated oils are not approved for use. A recent article in Motor magazine reports on this. "Better Quality Oils Matter As you were digesting the alphabet soup above, you might have wondered: Where are the European automakers? In the European Union, the European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA) is the main lobbying and standards group of the automobile industry. They have no representation at API, nor do they have any interest in having any, which poses a challenge for those seeking harmonization of engine oil standards globally, given that vehicles and engines are sold worldwide. oils-img03-0818 But there’s good reason for this. European synthetic motor oils formulated to ACEA specs use different base oils than their North American synthetic—and even full synthetic—counterparts. Here’s what we’ve been told about the European engine oil experience with both GDI and TGDI engines using ACEA spec synthetic motor oil, compared to the same engines here in North America on API/ILSAC full synthetic engine oil: The engines in Europe perform better and last longer. The engines in Europe don’t have incomplete combustion issues. Over their lifetime, it costs less to maintain GDI and TGDI engines in Europe. The two very different synthetic engine oil track records speak volumes. If you have doubts, get an oil analysis of ACEA synthetics and API/ILSAC synthetic motor oils done and compare the results. Or speak to a fellow shop owner you know who regularly services Mercedes-Benz, BMW or VW/Audi vehicles with ACEA grades of synthetic motor oil recommended by the automaker. Then ask that owner about his experience regarding the differences in full synthetic oils that are manufactured to European standards vs. North American standards. There’s a distinct lack of awareness in North America that its full synthetic motor oils may not be equal in quality or performance to those manufactured to European standards. This may be why nearly all American-manufactured full synthetic motor oils have a disclaimer on the label: “This motor oil cannot be sold in Europe.” Engine oil manufacturers are aware of the differences, even if many service and repair professionals and their customers are not. Service Implications It’s clear that “full synthetic” is a marketing term that’s not well understood by consumers. It’s also evident that too many motorists—no automotive professionals, one hopes—also don’t appreciate the differences in motor oil quality, espousing an “engine oil is just a commodity; any oil will do” attitude, if you will. Likewise, we’re confident that some shops providing oil change services to owners of European vehicles are using API/ILSAC full synthetics rather than the specific engine oils those vehicle manufacturers recommend. Both situations are problematic. Customers here who use the lower quality oil end up paying more for maintaining their vehicles (for induction cleaning and engine rebuilding/replacement, for example). Then there’s the negative impact on our image as automotive professionals. We’re expected to know and advise better and then, once they’re fully informed, let our customers choose how to proceed. The questions: Do we, and are we fully informing those we serve? Dealerships have not previously been under pressure to do what’s right either, from an engine oil perspective, for their TGDI vehicles’ long-term health. Nor are they compelled to be concerned about the vehicle owners lowest long-term cost of ownership. But with the shift to manufacturing a growing number of their vehicles with TGDI engines, domestic and Asian automakers have been pressing their lubricant and additive manufacturing cohorts in API to develop engine oils engineered to address LSPI and other TGDI concerns. Independent shops often end up dealing with deferred maintenance, which arguably should have been performed earlier but wasn’t. In addition, shops have the difficult task of explaining carbon buildup, excessive sludge formation and other issues to the original or second owner, who had no idea of these potential problems or their cost when the vehicle was purchased. It’s important to continue the best practice in recommending the correct motor oil to customers and educating them why. It’s also important to continue industry education and having “coffee shop talks” with other shop owners to make them better aware. And we need to work with like-minded industry organizations to educate the public that their choice of motor oil does indeed matter. All three initiatives will expose service and repair facilities that aren’t doing what’s in our customers’ best interest. Consumers need to understand the consequences of using anything less than the right quality engine oil. For GDI and TGDI engines, manufacturers are selling improved GF-5 category motor oils. But the newly adopted and recently licensed SN Plus and SN Plus Resource Conserving oils are a new classification of GF-5 lubricants, and may be used in conjunction with API SN and API SN Plus RC seals. According to API, “SN Plus and SN Plus Resource Conserving will be the proper motor oils for your operation. Both make it easier for consumers to select engine oils designed specifically for use with GDI and TGDI engines. And both address resolving LSPI issues, offer improved protection for timing chains, valvetrain components, stop-start engines or any vehicle that features frequent starts and/or starts after extended periods of downtime.” Both will continue to be labeled GF-5 according to viscosity grade. Also, remember that the only SAE grades covered by GF-5 are SAE 0W-XX, SAE 5W-XX and SAE 10W-30. All ILSAC GF-5 licensed engine oils are now required to properly protect against LSPI, which affects GDI and, to a larger extent, TGDI engines. “API SN Plus was developed as a lubricant solution to address the issue of low-speed preignition in the field,” notes Matt Timmons, Vice President, OEM Engagement, The Lubrizol Corp. “OEMs required a solution to an increasingly prevalent and severe problem that plagued their vehicles. With the Sequence IX Test for LSPI, those vehicles are now better protected. OEMs have a lubricant solution for an issue that would otherwise require costly, time-consuming and progress-inhibiting engine redesign.
 
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Originally Posted By: Speak2Mountain
Slight Contrarian View: Amsoil 0w40 and move your OCI's to 10-15k
Castrol and M1 0W-40 can easily handle 15k OCIs. That is one of the primary reasons they have the “Big 4” European manufacturer approvals. Amsoil 0W-40 does not have a single approval.
 
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Originally Posted By: Piston_slap
...According to API, “SN Plus and SN Plus Resource Conserving will be the proper motor oils for your operation. Both make it easier for consumers to select engine oils designed specifically for use with GDI and TGDI engines. And both address resolving LSPI issues, offer improved protection for timing chains, valvetrain components, stop-start engines or any vehicle that features frequent starts and/or starts after extended periods of downtime.”...
I know that Dexos1 Gen2 offers reduced timimg chain wear (stretch), but have seen nothing about SN PLUS doing the same. https://www.oronite.com/products/api_snplus.asp
 
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I will stick with d1 G2 oils for now.
Quote:
According to API, “SN Plus and SN Plus Resource Conserving will be the proper motor oils for your operation. Both make it easier for consumers to select engine oils designed specifically for use with GDI and TGDI engines. And both address resolving LSPI issues, offer improved protection for timing chains, valvetrain components, stop-start engines or any vehicle that features frequent starts and/or starts after extended periods of downtime.”
SN+ does NOT include timing chain wear tests
 
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I'm completely confused why this thread about oil for a 2006 Audi A4 3.2 got on the track of dexos oils. His engine specs 502 00 and there are at least a couple outstanding examples of such oils at Walmart for a very low price.
 
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