2003 Lincoln Navigator, 5110 miles Schaeffer 5w20

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Third UOA for the Navigator, my main objective is to monitor the engine after some major repairs. One cylinder head was replaced early in its life and all timing chain tensioners/guides were replaced at 42,700 miles. Motorcraft filters were used for all OCI's. From left to right the oil in use was Schaeffer's 5w20, AMSOIL 0w20, and Motorcraft 5w20 (dealer installed after engine work). Most trips with this vehicle are over 15 miles, it gets some decent highway trips throughout the year with some occasional towing. Fuel economy has been a solid 12.6 MPG annual average for each of the last three years.
 
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 Quote:
One cylinder head was replaced early in its life and all timing chain tensioners/guides were replaced at 42,700 miles.
Wow, that's unusual - those 5.4's are pretty bulletproof.. addyguy's right - MC5-20 is a pretty stout performer. \:\!
 

Rob_Roy

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 Originally Posted By: RWEST
Wow, that's unusual - those 5.4's are pretty bulletproof.. addyguy's right - MC5-20 is a pretty stout performer. \:\!
The cylinder head was replaced at ~2000 miles due to some sort of oil restriction that causing valvetrain noise. As for the timing chains, one of the tensioners was bleeding off overnight and causing the chain to clatter when the engine was started. It was on the same side that the cylinder head was replaced. The tech. said he had seen the same issue before with tensioners that had been previously collapsed to remove the chains. As a precaution, they replaced all the tensioners and guides under warranty. Thankfully it has had zero issues since the work was done, the engine is whisper quiet and very smooth. I agree on the MC 5w20, it is a great oil for the money.
 
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Originally Posted By: Rob_Roy
Third UOA for the Navigator, my main objective is to monitor the engine after some major repairs. One cylinder head was replaced early in its life and all timing chain tensioners/guides were replaced at 42,700 miles. Motorcraft filters were used for all OCI's. From left to right the oil in use was Schaeffer's 5w20, AMSOIL 0w20, and Motorcraft 5w20 (dealer installed after engine work). Most trips with this vehicle are over 15 miles, it gets some decent highway trips throughout the year with some occasional towing. Fuel economy has been a solid 12.6 MPG annual average for each of the last three years.
With all the repair work that engine has had you are pretty much going to have to look at it as a new engine for a while. Regardless of which oil you use it would be wise to stay with it for at least anoter 15-20K to see how much better/longer the runs can be. Obviously, the Amsoil should be stretched out a good bit to make it cost-effective(and it can be). The Schaeffer oil can also be lenghtened a good bit too and so can Motorcraft. Thats if the repairs were done right and the engine has no further "issues".
 

Rob_Roy

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I am surprised to see this much activity on this thread, it is six months old. At any rate, this UOA was on the last of my Schaeffer's stock and I've since switched to Texas Refinery 5w30. I have about 5k on the current fill of TRC 5w30 and will get a vacuum pump sample in a few weeks.
 
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Originally Posted By: Rob_Roy
I am surprised to see this much activity on this thread, it is six months old. At any rate, this UOA was on the last of my Schaeffer's stock and I've since switched to Texas Refinery 5w30. I have about 5k on the current fill of TRC 5w30 and will get a vacuum pump sample in a few weeks.
If you look back a few posts there's another Schaeffers 5W20 UOA on a similar truck ('06 F-150) that was less-than-stellar and resulted in a fair bit of discussion.
 
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Originally Posted By: RWEST
Quote:
One cylinder head was replaced early in its life and all timing chain tensioners/guides were replaced at 42,700 miles.
Wow, that's unusual - those 5.4's are pretty bulletproof.. addyguy's right - MC5-20 is a pretty stout performer. thumbsup
The navigator is a 5.4L DOHC 32v motor.. The run of the mill 5.4L motor found in the light duty trucks is SOHC.. The navigator motor has had a little bit more problems throwing spark plugs through the cylinder head. If you can avoid that, they are tanks as well. Thirsty tanks. My mom used to have one of these yachts. We found that it would do better on fuel economy with premium fuel. Lincoln recommends premium fuel, but if you run 87 in it, the knock sensor will just pull back the timing and run fine.
 
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Just don't forget to look at the 5.4 UOA's with a thicker oil. They tend to be better in the bigger vehicles. If you have a 5.4, you either have a Mustang GT500, a Ford Lightning, or MORE THAN LIKELY, a very, very heavy vehicle with that engine in it. Don't forget, the 5.4 in the Mustang calls for a thicker oil, too. It's making more power, but Expeditions are hauling more weight.
 
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Originally Posted By: Jaymus
Just don't forget to look at the 5.4 UOA's with a thicker oil. They tend to be better in the bigger vehicles. If you have a 5.4, you either have a Mustang GT500, a Ford Lightning, or MORE THAN LIKELY, a very, very heavy vehicle with that engine in it. Don't forget, the 5.4 in the Mustang calls for a thicker oil, too. It's making more power, but Expeditions are hauling more weight.
Yeah, a lot more power. Its supercharged.
 
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Yeah and the Ford GT, also. I know they call for a thicker oil because they are taking into consideration that it may be driven like at a track, and they are making 500-550bhp, and oil temps will probably see 275-300F+ easy depending on driving. But 250F oil temps aren't out of the ordinary in a heavy V8 (say 6500 pound (? dunno their weight)Expedition pulling 7000 pound camper behind them. They may call for 5W-20, but don't you think the oil temps could be pushing 250F+ with that operation? I know mod motors are tight, and 5W-20 does do great in them, especially Castrol GTX and Pennzoil Platinum I've noticed in UOA's. Just saying, I don't see anything wrong with running a 40 weight in one, either. They show absolutely no more wear in the UOAs. I would argue they show less. I believe Overkill's did, and it was recent. RTS 5W-40, correct? In a 5.4 Expedition?
 
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Originally Posted By: Jaymus
Yeah and the Ford GT, also. I know they call for a thicker oil because they are taking into consideration that it may be driven like at a track, and they are making 500-550bhp, and oil temps will probably see 275-300F+ easy depending on driving. But 250F oil temps aren't out of the ordinary in a heavy V8 (say 6500 pound (? dunno their weight)Expedition pulling 7000 pound camper behind them. They may call for 5W-20, but don't you think the oil temps could be pushing 250F+ with that operation? I know mod motors are tight, and 5W-20 does do great in them, especially Castrol GTX and Pennzoil Platinum I've noticed in UOA's. Just saying, I don't see anything wrong with running a 40 weight in one, either. They show absolutely no more wear in the UOAs. I would argue they show less. I believe Overkill's did, and it was recent. RTS 5W-40, correct? In a 5.4 Expedition?
I'm gonna be picky over the characterization of high oil temps as "common" in modulars. Maybe in racing circles or constant hauling (like the guy I know of that hauls sailboats across country with a V10). Overall, I don't think the modulars run at high oil temps (relatively speaking) because they are OHC with roller followers.That seems to be what I pick up from other sources as well as from my own 5.4L. My '05 3V 5.4L seldom reaches 210F oil temp as measured in the pan. Usually runs under 200F, so the 5W20 in it is running within a 30 grade viscosity range normally anyway. It's a farm truck, so it does get work at times but I've never see the oil higher than 215F. I wouldn't be afraid of using a 5W30 or 0W30 in it if I worked it continuously at that higher temp. I have winters to deal with here, plus try to wring out the best FE possible, and the oils I have been using are just two ticks below grade 30 anyway. I will repeat my mantra, though; when discussing modulars, we must separate the VVT engine and the non-VVT. The valve timing apparatus in VVT mods are more sensitive to viscosity (though exactly how much we are not sure) so one should take care using a high viscosity oil in them. Especially in a cool/cold climate and when not working them at a high oil temp. Non VVT... have at that 40 grade! Regardless of climate or oil temp. If I had too much time on my hands, I might try to argue that it doesn't have any benefit, but it certainly does no harm, except perhaps to fuel economy. In some cases, it could well be necessary.
 
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I think mod motors run cool, myself, after owning one and the 'dummy' oil pressure gauge never coming down from the peak position, no matter how much hot rodding. I'm just talking about one being put to work. Any average vehicle runs 180F-210F, wouldn't one say? And I'm talking oil temps. Maybe an aluminum block in some 10F weather might run cooler. But put a few thousand extra pounds behind any vehicle, and you're gonna have to use twice the throttle, usually run higher RPM (especially in a mod motor), and generally be harder on the engine. All the extra throttle + higher RPM + increased load = more heat. Lots of people report 250F+ while towing no matter what the engine, although, I know the engine will make a difference. I see your experience is different, although I didn't see the towing times and payloads you were towing. I definitely always take into consideration of oil temps and viscosity ratings at "100C". That vehicles rarely hit that 100C under normal conditions, and in your case, a 20w oil is great for your engine.
 
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Originally Posted By: Jaymus
I think mod motors run cool, myself, after owning one and the 'dummy' oil pressure gauge never coming down from the peak position, no matter how much hot rodding. I'm just talking about one being put to work. Any average vehicle runs 180F-210F, wouldn't one say? And I'm talking oil temps. Maybe an aluminum block in some 10F weather might run cooler. But put a few thousand extra pounds behind any vehicle, and you're gonna have to use twice the throttle, usually run higher RPM (especially in a mod motor), and generally be harder on the engine. All the extra throttle + higher RPM + increased load = more heat. Lots of people report 250F+ while towing no matter what the engine, although, I know the engine will make a difference. I see your experience is different, although I didn't see the towing times and payloads you were towing. I definitely always take into consideration of oil temps and viscosity ratings at "100C". That vehicles rarely hit that 100C under normal conditions, and in your case, a 20w oil is great for your engine.
We're not to far apart on this. I see the other side of the coin and acknowledge the need for higher viscosity at times, but where we differ, perhaps, is the point at which it's necessary. I can only make judgmeents on what I see with my own equipment and make choices based on that. And pontificate on BITOG, of course ( : < ). I wish more people on BITOG with Modulars would invest in a programmer with realtime readouts, or a Scangauge, so we could compare notes on oil temps. I'd really be interest in doing that. The most I've towed with my truck ('05 F-150HD 4x4 8200# GVW, 4.10 axle ratios) is about 30,000 pounds of grain in wagons, but that was at 25 mph and for under 10 miles. The most it's towed/ hauled any distance was about 6500 pound (a mixed load in the bed and in a trailer) for several hundred miles. The latter situation is where I saw the 215... actually it was 219 according to my notes... but it went up and down according to the hills I was climbing. It was the early part of summer... muggy but only about mid 80s ambient. The big load just showed normal oil temps. I regularly haul about 3000 pounds of seed in the bed for up to about 30 miles. I see up ticks in trans and rear axle temp, but only a few degrees in oil temp. Bear in mind that I am a "Gauge-o-Haulic" and it's all I can do th stay focused on the road and not may gauges. I assure you, I can quit at any time. Really! My Name is Jim and I'm a Gauge-o-Haulic.
 
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