Would a monster broadcast siren negate the massive rise in carjackings?

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The “carry gun” as a preventative to carjacking has the problem thsst most carjackers appear with their gun in hand an pointed AT you!

If you then GO FOR YOUR GUN? He has ample time to shoot you to protect HIS life. Isn’t that what you would do in his shoes?

Only TV heroes can out-draw a trigger pull!
Or the IDF that carry unloaded in the chamber.
 
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Never said anything about a firefight. Owning a firearm takes a lot of responsibility, maturity, and respect. This isn’t an old black and white western. You have to respect the firearm. If you’re not proficient in your shooting accuracy, or if you tremble at the sight of a firearm, then no, you shouldn’t even be anywhere near a firearm.

Very good points. It used to practically be a given, years ago, that a gun owner had maturity and a high level of responsibility. Of course, the criminal does not. What also scares me is the number of recent new gun owners and the attitudes of some of them. I have several longtime friends of varying closeness that have become first time firearm owners in the past several years. Partially for home protection but also largely because they fear extremists. All have had previous lifetime opposition to gun ownership at some level. All basically good people but I know their somewhat elitist attitudes. Due to a general attitude of not needing to learn anything or to respect the danger, they are a threat in their own. There are millions of new gun owners. Some will get it right and some will not. The ones that I know went right to autoloader pistols, which I've always advised against for neophytes.
 
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All valid points. I think it would be more effective if there were a delay in activation. Let bad guy get around the corner with the car before it goes off and discourages him from staying inside.

I could see liability being an issue. "My innocent client who only borrowed the car because he was so deperate to get to the college so he could enrol and turn his life around, lost control due to the noise and that's why the pedestrian is dead."

Wouldn't it be more efficient to have tha engine stall after a minute, and not restart? pretty sure they won't hang around and in a minute they are too far to run back towards the victim.
 

Astro14

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Wouldn't it be more efficient to have tha engine stall after a minute, and not restart? pretty sure they won't hang around and in a minute they are too far to run back towards the victim.
That’s a more workable/safer concept. Sort of like remotely disabling an iPhone. They drive off, you “brick” the car remotely, when you’re safe.
 
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Just a point to consider in regards to protecting yourself with a firearm on the street. Most of the states that show the highest carjacking and violent crime rates, are also the least friendly in regards to private citizens carrying and using firearms for self defense.

If you do have to drop someone because they tried to jack you, it's more than likely not going to go well for you from a legal standpoint. An overly aggressive prosecuting attorney, attached to an anti gun administration, can and most likely will make your life a living hell legally, as well as financially.

As much as it goes against everything I believe, give them the car. It will most likely end up being cheaper for you, as opposed to dropping the guy with a legally carried firearm.
 

GON

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Just a point to consider in regards to protecting yourself with a firearm on the street. Most of the states that show the highest carjacking and violent crime rates, are also the least friendly in regards to private citizens carrying and using firearms for self defense.

If you do have to drop someone because they tried to jack you, it's more than likely not going to go well for you from a legal standpoint. An overly aggressive prosecuting attorney, attached to an anti gun administration, can and most likely will make your life a living hell legally, as well as financially.

As much as it goes against everything I believe, give them the car. It will most likely end up being cheaper for you, as opposed to dropping the guy with a legally carried firearm.
I have no problem giving "them" the car.

The issue for some, especially a woman, is the PTSD and other risks/ issues that may come from a carjacking. A carjacking for some, may leave a lifelong emotional scar on a person. I am not a psychotherapist by any means but am married to one. I have learned from my Wife is when someone is abused in one form or another, deep damage to the abused person may occur at times. Sometimes super deep emotional damage.

A 60-year-old woman returning home at 2pm on a Tuesday from shopping at Target and gets a guy putting a gun in her face, throws her in the street. Her phone and purse still in the car. In a city where she knows not a sole. Maybe that 60-year-old woman never leaves the house again. More at stake for some than just the loss of a vehicle.

After a violent carjacking, the loss of the vehicle may be the easiest issue to deal with. Some, especially an older woman, many never recover from a violent crime.
 
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Very good points. It used to practically be a given, years ago, that a gun owner had maturity and a high level of responsibility. Of course, the criminal does not. What also scares me is the number of recent new gun owners and the attitudes of some of them. I have several longtime friends of varying closeness that have become first time firearm owners in the past several years. Partially for home protection but also largely because they fear extremists. All have had previous lifetime opposition to gun ownership at some level. All basically good people but I know their somewhat elitist attitudes. Due to a general attitude of not needing to learn anything or to respect the danger, they are a threat in their own. There are millions of new gun owners. Some will get it right and some will not. The ones that I know went right to autoloader pistols, which I've always advised against for neophytes.
It is the right of every American to bear arms...having said that...do I think everyone should own a gun...no...I don't think everyone should have a license to drive either.

Purchasing, owning, learning about (and maintaining) a firearm is a BIG responsibility. Buy a firearm is like buying a home or car...leave your emotions out of it.
 
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I have no problem giving "them" the car.

The issue for some, especially a woman, is the PTSD and other risks/ issues that may come from a carjacking. A carjacking for some, may leave a lifelong scar on a person. I am not a psychotherapist by any means but am married to one. I have learned from her is when someone is abused in one form or another, deep damage to the at times occur.

A 60-year-old woman coming homing at 2pm on a Tuesday from shopping at Target and gets a guy putting a gun in her face, throws her in the street. Her phone and purse still in the car. In a city where she knows not a sole. Maybe that 60-year-old woman never leaves the house again. More at stake for some than just the loss of a vehicle.
I agree with everything you just said. But if that same person were to successfully defended themselves by shooting, and perhaps killing their assailant, They are most likely going to have an even worse time living through the event.

A lot of people never get over killing someone. Even if was just, and / or they had no other choice, (war). The V.A. is full of such mentally damaged and scarred individuals.
 

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Well, the new Tahoe has LoJack in it - not by choice - someone else ordered the unit but their loan fell through …
Anyone using LoJack ? - I plan to keep OnStar active - but have not signed up for LoJack …
 
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I have no problem giving "them" the car.

The issue for some, especially a woman, is the PTSD and other risks/ issues that may come from a carjacking. A carjacking for some, may leave a lifelong emotional scar on a person. I am not a psychotherapist by any means but am married to one. I have learned from my Wife is when someone is abused in one form or another, deep damage to the abused person may occur at times. Sometimes super deep emotional damage.

A 60-year-old woman returning home at 2pm on a Tuesday from shopping at Target and gets a guy putting a gun in her face, throws her in the street. Her phone and purse still in the car. In a city where she knows not a sole. Maybe that 60-year-old woman never leaves the house again. More at stake for some than just the loss of a vehicle.

After a violent carjacking, the loss of the vehicle may be the easiest issue to deal with. Some, especially an older woman, many never recover from a violent crime.
This is a very difficult topic to address and appears to have no easy, one size fits all answer. Thinking a little differently on this, who or what organization would be the best to answer these questions?

From my perspective, I don't even know who I would ask about this. What professional would be best equipped to provide answers to these questions?

Police, Security, Hostage Rescue, HRT leader, Personal Security Coach, etc.

What even are some of the questions? How not to become a target, How to avoid this scenario, etc. All of these seem to lead to a thought process that might become debilitating and self-limiting.

I can only speak for myself, but I have changed my behavior to not go out later at night, not assume I'm safe, and I only shop where I feel completely comfortable. As a guy, I have certain things in my favor compared to a smaller female. I would say it is most likely highly improbable that I would ever understand the potential fear and lack of safety that a woman would feel in the same set of circumstances.

This is a really difficult topic and I believe it needs professional answers for some kind of helpful thoughts on the matter.
 
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GON

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Sounds like a bull inside of a china shop if you ask me
She is a psychotherapist. Master at listening, and then cleaning ones clock if she believes certain things are not being done, like being empathetic or ethical, etc. I learned years ago to leave my mouth shut and avoid answering certain questions. She does 99 percent of her work pro Bono.

But she is wonderful, she is just a super honest person, brutally honest. She could not and wouldn't even know how to tell even a white lie to save one of our children's life's.

We all are different and bring different things to the table. In her case, she brings brilliant understanding and empathy. Nobody better to listen to grieving parent that lost a child than my wife. On the other extreme, she doesn't know how to put gas in a car...
 
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Sounds like you found somebody to even you out. That's really what it always is or tries to become. That's why the book Men are from Mars and women are from Venus was written I suppose
 
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Actually yes, we both do. She and I are licensed and trained personal protection officers. But that’s beside the point. I know CA is not a firearm friendly country, so I’m guessing most of not all citizens there are allowed to own firearms. Or am I totally wrong?

Responsible US citizens have the constitutional right to bear arms (unless you have a criminal record of course).
Well, that's good for you, can the average person become a licensed personal protection officer in a couple hours, practicing a couple times a year? Probably not... and half the people are below average... Why do people bother hiring personal protection? They could just train and wear 3 guns themselves everyday ;)
We have lots of guns in Canada, I'm certainly not a gun enthusiast but I have 4 long guns for different jobs. Car jacking or home invasion is probably around getting hit by a meteorite in my threat assessment where I live though... So I'm fine with almost no one being able to carry a handgun on the street.
I actually agree with the right to bear arms for the public to defend themselves against a government who had gone against the constitution(not just different politics), but long guns are good enough for that.
 
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Why do people bother hiring personal protection? They could just train and wear 3 guns themselves everyday


Because it comes down to one simple fact. Are they ready to kill someone? That is the question that everyone that carries has to ask themselves. If you pull the gun you had better be ready to use it.

I am all for carrying but along with that comes the responsibility of being proficient with the firearm and knowing the laws. That requires dedicated time.
 
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