Why does not Castrol just make there 0W30 in North America vs. Importing it?

Messages
1,715
Location
Texas & BWI Area
Sorry, This question just came to my mind and it supercedes my youthful reasoning capability. The Sham-Tec issue is a dead horse yes. My question is premised on the fact the Domestic market DOES want PA) or Ester based synthetic. Although the average joe may not know those chemical groups, they assume anything synthetic is akin to Mobil 1. So why go through all he trouble of European refineries and transatlantic cargo etc to import this stuff? North America certainly has the pre-existing industrial capability and there are literally thousands of jobless chemical, plant, industrial etc engineers that could staff the place to create this stuff right here in the States. Castrol....your corporate reasoning dumbfounds me.
 
Messages
8,467
Location
Colorado
The situation involving the German Castrol is beyond my understanding also. Perhaps Castrol is just dumping the German Castrol in North America-maybe it did not sell in Europe or another newer oil replaced the German Castrol. It seems to me that Castrol has a product in the German Castrol that could compete with Mobil 1. Especially if they made in in the USA and in different viscosities. I think if I was the CEO of Castrol I would be going for it. If I was the CEO of Castrol I would start producing it in North America and in several viscosities (0W-30, 5W-20, 5W-30, 10W-30, 15W-40). I would advertise it as a better oil then Mobil 1. But I guess that is the reason I am not the CEO of Castrol.
 
Messages
33,974
Location
Southern NJ
The time has come IMO that Castrol should stop fooling around and get rid of Syntec Group III. Its garbage and a total waste of money. They should bring over there fully synthetic oils that they sell in Australia, such as Castrol R or whatever it is, and compete with Mobil 1. Give Mobil 1 a good kick in the @ss would be great. [Wink]
 
Messages
8,756
Location
RI
There is a shortage of group III oils since they are so popular now. So, Castrol imports the group III oil from one of its other refineries [Big Grin]
 
Messages
8,467
Location
Colorado
I am no expert but I do not believe that the German Castrol is a Group III. Open a bottle of the German Castrol if you can find it and check out the color and the smell. It is about as similar to conventional motor oils as a SUV is to an economy car.
 
Messages
8,937
Location
SC
Castrol's decision to import the 0w30 SLX from Germany and sell it here as Syntec makes a lot of sense. All the "nuts" on this board notwithstanding, Castrol 0w30 is never going to be a "big seller" in North America, and Castrol knows this. Why, then, would they want to invest millions of dollars in converting one of their existing blending facilites here in the US to produce this oil? They would have to IMPORT all its ingredients from Germany, so why not just import the finished oil since it's already being made there? I'm sure Castrol ran the numbers and importing SLX was the most cost effective way to get an A3 rated 0wXX oil on the shelves to compete with Mobil 1 0w40.
 
Messages
8,467
Location
Colorado
But how will they compete with Mobil 1 unless a lot of this German Castrol oil is available in the USA? If every motor oil expert in America declared the German Castrol to be superior to Mobil 1, it would make no difference unless the German Castrol is available in large quantities.
 
Messages
8,937
Location
SC
quote:
Originally posted by Mystic: But how will they compete with Mobil 1 unless a lot of this German Castrol oil is available in the USA? If every motor oil expert in America declared the German Castrol to be superior to Mobil 1, it would make no difference unless the German Castrol is available in large quantities.
Give it time. Remember, Mobil 1 0w40 was initially only available at Mercedes-Benz and Porsche dealers. Then, for several months the only retail outlet it was sold at was Autozone. Now Wal-Mart sells it. If there is enough demand for the German Syntec, more places will start carrying it.
 
Messages
5,358
Location
Gone
quote:
Originally posted by outrun: Sorry, This question just came to my mind and it supercedes my youthful reasoning capability. The Sham-Tec issue is a dead horse yes. My question is premised on the fact the Domestic market DOES want PA) or Ester based synthetic. Although the average joe may not know those chemical groups, they assume anything synthetic is akin to Mobil 1. So why go through all he trouble of European refineries and transatlantic cargo etc to import this stuff? North America certainly has the pre-existing industrial capability and there are literally thousands of jobless chemical, plant, industrial etc engineers that could staff the place to create this stuff right here in the States. Castrol....your corporate reasoning dumbfounds me.
outrun, I wish they made NONE of their oils in the US. First, I like buying an oil that was blended for the driving conditions one finds in Europe. Second, some people like imported wines; a lot of people like imported cars; I LIKE European sourced engine oil. I am not saying all European oils are "magic." I just prefer them. I believe Amsoil makes great synthetics, Pennzoil great dinos, Schaeffers a great blended oil and Mobil a great diesel synthetic (Delvac 1) and I hope they all sell a lot of product and provide US workers a lot of job opportunities; but, as a personal preference, give me a European oil any time. [ October 04, 2003, 01:48 AM: Message edited by: pscholte ]
 
Messages
4,478
Location
Southern California
Mobil flooding the consumer market with PAOs notwithstanding, PAOs are in shorter supply than Group IIIs - and by the nature of their infrasturcture and production expense always will be. However, the same technology used to produce Group IIs is used to produce Group IIIs - essentially the feed stock is just left in the catalytic hydro-cooker longer at higher temperature and pressure. (There's a little more to it than that - but not much.) I have seen NOTHING official in print that GC uses PAOs. It may, but it may also use Group IIIs for all anyone knows. Castrol is mum on the subject. (Duhh!) What we apparantly DO know about GC is that it's heavily fortified with ester, and THAT may be the key to its alleged sterling qualities. As to the notion of (presumably) harsher climatic and driving conditions in Europe vis-a-vis North America as evidence of European oils' performance superiority, balderdash. Even in the U.S. we have climatic conditions that match most of the winter conditions and outright exceed the summer conditions of Europe (this just recently concluded summer in Europe being the lone historical exception). The average oils that average Europeans pour into their average automobile engines is no better than what Americans typically use. Get into the high-price automobile category - Mercedes, BMW, Jaguar, passionate Italian screamers, and the situation is different. But the same is true in the U.S. with highly tuned G.M. V-8s and Chrysler V-10s where Mobil 1 is factory and recommended service fill. For all who insist on European "designer boutique" oils, fine. It's your money. But conventional Group II oils are better than they've ever been and average cars will go just as long on them with factory oil change intervals as they will with the high buck oils*. The VAST majority of cars in junkyards are not there because the engine oil failed. They're there because they were WRECKED. *Where was the vaunted superiority of high-buck oils in the Mercedes fiasco? Mercedes is paying out ~$23,000,000.00 to owners for damage allegedly sustained to engines because the Mercedes DEALERS were using the wrong oil for these extended-drain applications. Am I the only one on this board that's suspicious that Mercedes' position is just a bit self-serving? After all, Mercedes is picking up the tab on these free routine oil changes - NOT the dealer. (Well, really the owners are - those "free" oil changes during the life of the warranty are factored into the cars' cost.) Why would a Mercedes dealer cut corners, then? Could it be that Mercedes was looking for a scapegoat in a desperate attempt to maintain customer loyalty rather than admitting that expecting 15,000+ miles is just too **** much for ANY oil under AMERICAN driving conditions, and that the company's engineers (who's objections were more likely overridden by the marketing department) screwed up in how the "Flexible Service System" parameters were programmed? I'm not dissing Mercedes per se. I truly admire the marque, but the company has had some undeniable QC issues over the past several years. Their obsession with extended service intervals, presumably from "greens" pressure, hasn't helped. I'm not certain which is worse - Europe's "greens" pressuring auto manufacturers for ever longer oil change intervals, or EPA "CAFE" pressures for thinner viscosity. Seems like entirely different approaches to the same problem and until it's worked out which is better, it's the hapless consumers who'll be stuck with the consequences in most cases.
 
Messages
2,908
Location
Georgia/Retired
Ray, I have to disagree with you about the idea that the 'common' European uses 'common' oil in their 'common' cars. I personally know far too many European families to make my observations unique. Europeans will purchase and use specifically what their manuals tell them to use. They don't go around looking for the cheapest €.99 bottle of oil. Vehicle ownership and responsibility is far too expensive to simply disregard the manufacturers recommendations. Even if you go into the German equivalent of a Big Lots store (named PickRaus if you're familiar) you will find a selection of motor oils that exceeds the API standards and every European manufacturers standard. My local Big Lots sells API SA oils for comparison. There is simply a different mind set when it comes to vehicle ownership in Europe. People will seek out and learn the cost of ownership before making a purchase because they know that the purchase price is the least expensive part of buying a new vehicle. When Mercedes tells them to use a oil that meets MB 229.3 then that is what gets used. I know one older gentleman that owns a 1988 BMW 320. The vehicle is a worn-out piece of junk but still passes the biennial TÜV inspection so it is kept for winter use. He purchases his oil from BMW in small 30 liter kegs and keeps it in his garage because this is what was specifically recommended to him by BMW. He simply doesn't question it. I read on the internet every single day of people that buy $40,000 BMW's in this country that simply can't imagine paying $5.00 for a quart of oil because they just know that this is a rip off. I will never understand the reasoning matrix of the human mind.
 

CJH

Messages
489
Location
Pennsylvania
Color and odor are often just additives. I wouldn't base a decision on color and odor.
quote:
Originally posted by Mystic: I am no expert but I do not believe that the German Castrol is a Group III. Open a bottle of the German Castrol if you can find it and check out the color and the smell. It is about as similar to conventional motor oils as a SUV is to an economy car.
 
Top