various temps while working...

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Yesterday I took my pistol infra red thermometer to work and took readings while we were doing a HUGE job where we ran stationary for over 4 hours continuously. This is a normal duty cycle for us. The vehicle is an old 06 GMC Savana 3500 with the 6.0 V8 and a coolant heat exchanger. The engine is running at 1500-1600 rpm and the load is actually pretty light as fuel consumption is 1.4 GPH. Oil pan temp- 201* fahrenheit oil filter- 211* trans pan- 188 Driver's side converter- 455* Radiator (top)- 178* It's pretty obvious that our Factory Authorized upfitter has worked this out pretty well. This unit has 400 hours on it and over 180k miles, still runs like a gem...
 

SteveSRT8

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19,686
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Sunny Florida
Originally Posted By: IndyIan
Does the trans do anything while sitting there? I guess an hp or 2 is used to pump fluid around even in Park.
It is in Park the whole time but the fluid still circulates very forcefully in a 4L80E even then. All our trucks run both oil and trans fluid into the radiator so this tends to standardize the temps somewhat, but the trans has a big cooler in front of the radiator. Since our trucks have different pulley ratios and a different clutch on the fan there is a LOT of airflow!
 
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That makes sense, I forgot many automatics share the rad with the engine. I should get one of those heat guns too, I'm curious what temps the trans fluid sees on the tractor. What brand is yours?
 

SteveSRT8

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Whew. Here's the web site for our Factory Authorized Upfitter: http://www.butlersystem.com/the-butler-system.html exranger06: The PTO is an elegantly simple shaft that runs across the driver's side cylinder head to the front of the engine. They use 2 V-belts that run outside the factory serpentine setup, very redundant and hard to kill. The best feature of my machines is their simplicity and reliability. We are out cleaning while the other guys are in the shop! Supton: Yes, there are two converters on these engines. FFeng7 and eljefino: Yes, this is a self contained cleaning system for ceramic tile and grout, stone, and carpets, too. We carry 110 gallons of fresh water and can handle 210 gallons of soiled water before we begin automatic pump out into a yard or flower bed. Indylan: I own a super cheap Harbor Freight thermometer gun. These systems are unique in our industry, as they last forever and have extremely high resale due to demand. Been around since about 1980, I've bought and wore out dozens and dozens of these...
 
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Thanks for the reply. That sounds interesting with the PTO running off of the belts on the front of the engine.
 

SteveSRT8

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Originally Posted By: eljefino
315 hp of scrubbing power! Rug Doctors don't have that! laugh
yessir, and the BIG deal is a small water/water heat exchanger plumbed into the heater bypass which cools the engine and heats the cleaning water at the same time. Completely variable of course and disarmingly simple. Plus it has tons of reserve, easily heats water from 40 degrees to 200+ immediately and continuously. Take THAT rug doc!
 
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'Stralia
Originally Posted By: SteveSRT8
and the BIG deal is a small water/water heat exchanger plumbed into the heater bypass which cools the engine and heats the cleaning water at the same time.
That's very very clever. I've found by measuring oil temperature directly with a type K thermocouple down the the dipstick tube that the oil's 15C (25-30F) hotter than the pan temp.
 

SteveSRT8

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19,686
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Originally Posted By: Shannow
Originally Posted By: SteveSRT8
and the BIG deal is a small water/water heat exchanger plumbed into the heater bypass which cools the engine and heats the cleaning water at the same time.
That's very very clever. I've found by measuring oil temperature directly with a type K thermocouple down the the dipstick tube that the oil's 15C (25-30F) hotter than the pan temp.
yes, and I was surprised to see the oil filter was a bit hotter than the sump myself...
 
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