Tungsten Disulfide (Wolfram Disulfide)

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360
Location
VA, US
Anyone has any experience with mixing WS2 in gear oils? Positive, negative?
I understand that will create a very thin film (particle size thickness), with ultra low friction.

I am tempted to add one oz of WS2 in each of my rear differential and the transfer case. Both non LS, the differential is electrically actuated, but the actuator is sealed from the actual differential fluid.
The OE oil specified for those is 80W90 GL5, but right now I have in there Redline 75W110 GL5.
The source of WS2 is Microlubrol, with 0.5 µ particle size: Tungsten disulfide - Microlubrol
Planning to just blow somehow (short clear hose?) the dust inside the fill port.
 
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35,696
Location
NY
I contacted a manufacture/supplier of "nano" WS2 years ago when I was using it to coat bullets. I asked about adding it to oil or gear oil, because at the time it was popular here. They advised against it, and said it would fall out of suspension, quickly. It did make for a good bullet coating.
 
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17,284
Location
Upper Midwest
I know it is an often over-used question but I think it's applicable in this situation. If gear oil blenders thought that was a good idea why wouldn't available products already have this as part of their formulation? Do you think you're making it more better than an entity that formulates gear oil for a living? The Redline product as a prime example.
 

SoNic67

Thread starter
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360
Location
VA, US
They advised against it, and said it would fall out of suspension, quickly.
The material that I read claims that WS2 will bind to iron surfaces, when heated by friction. Inside a differential, the oil is constantly splashed around, can't see it settling down.
why wouldn't available products already have this as part of their formulation?
Did you read about Liqui Molly? They made a whole brand out of the Molybdenum disulfide MoS2, a very close cousin of WS2.

There are many studies about WS2. Example:

making it more better
Yes, I think I will make it "more better". Funny how everyone feels the need to comment on science, even if they can't use proper grammar.

BTW, from the link bellow: "Castrol was the first to introduce tungsten to motor oils with its revolutionary anti-wear properties and in the 1970s launched a low viscosity rated engine oil to the consumer market that boasted significant fuel efficiency benefits – a product formerly available to racing teams."
 
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Messages
17,284
Location
Upper Midwest
The material that I read claims that WS2 will bind to iron surfaces, when heated by friction. Inside a differential, the oil is constantly splashed around, can't see it settling down.

Did you read about Liqui Molly? They made a whole brand out of the Molybdenum disulfide MoS2, a very close cousin of WS2.

There are many studies about WS2. Example:


Yes, I think I will make it "more better". Funny how everyone feels the need to comment on science, even if they can't use proper grammar.

BTW, from the link bellow: "Castrol was the first to introduce tungsten to motor oils with its revolutionary anti-wear properties and in the 1970s launched a low viscosity rated engine oil to the consumer market that boasted significant fuel efficiency benefits – a product formerly available to racing teams."
So they dump powder into the oil as you are suggesting? And it's "Liqui Moly", not Liqui Molly. Funny how people need to comment on comments even if they can't use proper spelling.

And my grammar was meant to be incorrect. What science are you doing? What measurements are you planning on taking to determine the result and what is your control? Will your results be statistically valid?

Science is a lot more than dumping a powder into your gear case and seeing if it feels more better. Or at least it should be, it's not always the case on here.
 
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290
Location
Australia
Lookout 'someone's' has used google... Moly is ten times better anyway but I wouldn't be putting it in my diff or transmission.
 

MolaKule

Staff member
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21,913
Location
Iowegia - USA
Anyone has any experience with mixing WS2 in gear oils? Positive, negative?
I understand that will create a very thin film (particle size thickness), with ultra low friction.

I am tempted to add one oz of WS2 in each of my rear differential and the transfer case. Both non LS, the differential is electrically actuated, but the actuator is sealed from the actual differential fluid.
The OE oil specified for those is 80W90 GL5, but right now I have in there Redline 75W110 GL5.
The source of WS2 is Microlubrol, with 0.5 µ particle size: Tungsten disulfide - Microlubrol
Planning to just blow somehow (short clear hose?) the dust inside the fill port.
Why would this be better than Di-tridecylammonium Tungstate??

MICROLUBROL: Lowest coefficient of friction of any of the commonly used dry lubricants including molybdenum disulfide, graphite and hexagonal boron nitride.
 
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SoNic67

Thread starter
Messages
360
Location
VA, US
Well, once it clings on the iron it can be dry or wet, so who cares?
It's a thin layer between two metals... At high pressure, when the liquid film breaks, all it remains is dry friction.

But yeah, I see what you are saying... Anyway, where is that liquid used in?
 
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2,388
Location
Paradise of Florida

Install a differential temperature sender/gauge and see if your additive does anything.
 

SoNic67

Thread starter
Messages
360
Location
VA, US
I think I will measure with a handheld "laser" sight IR gun. Before and after. I don't have a sensor in that differential/transfer case.
 
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35,696
Location
NY
@SoNic67 Why would a company that mfgs. and sells the product advise against its use in engine oil and gear oil? Why haven't the major oil companies latched onto it? It has been around for a long time, over a decade since I stumbled upon it. Those were the first two questions that popped into my head when I was researching the product. After hearing from the mfg. advising against using it, that was all I needed to know. As far as it settling in the bottom of a differential or in an oil pan, @Trav posted pictures of MoS2 settled in the bottom of his oil pan right after he started the engine moved the car and dropped the oil pan. MoS2 is supposed to be the better of the two for an oil additive, it had fallen out of suspension. That reinforced my findings even more. IMO both are poor choices as an oil additive. But it sounds like your mind is made up, so go for it, it might work for you.
 
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2,388
Location
Paradise of Florida
Doesn't need to be strictly controlled. Can be a typical average and will need a noticeable difference to be considered effective. Its too simple no to do for comparison. I commute every and my oil temps hit 200F every day. I don't need strict control and its not a worthless exercise if I add something and the temps drop to 180F or climb to 220F... Strict control... might be required if you're looking for a 1/10 degree change in temperature.

When blending anything, I am pretty sure that profit margin and using available approved additive packages is what a blender is looking at. Also, product producers don't want liability for anything not tested. If you want to know why a manufacturer of a product doesn't recommend it for something, ask them for the data if any.
 
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17,284
Location
Upper Midwest
Doesn't need to be strictly controlled. Can be a typical average and will need a noticeable difference to be considered effective. Its too simple no to do for comparison. I commute every and my oil temps hit 200F every day. I don't need strict control and its not a worthless exercise if I add something and the temps drop to 180F or climb to 220F... Strict control... might be required if you're looking for a 1/10 degree change in temperature.

When blending anything, I am pretty sure that profit margin and using available approved additive packages is what a blender is looking at. Also, product producers don't want liability for anything not tested. If you want to know why a manufacturer of a product doesn't recommend it for something, ask them for the data if any.
Sure. Considering you have no idea whatsoever what the effect may be (if any) then running a completely uncontrolled experiment is a good idea, right?

It's amazing what some people think passes for "science" but I suppose I should not be surprised.
 
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25,971
Location
MA, Mittelfranken.de
Nothing new..

castrol with tungsten.jpg
 
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17,284
Location
Upper Midwest
Uncontrolled experiments are run everyday by consumers blindly trusting the automaker and available oil brands/filters out there. Big deal
That makes no technical sense whatsoever. To imply that approvals and certifications aren’t based on solid science borders on ridiculous.

More evidence that many of the comments and statements on here are based on something other than reason.
 
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