Thinner oils are better for your engine. Let's stop debating "Thick vs Thin".

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**Before I begin, I want to say that I might have left some typos and misspelled a couple words. I will fix those as time goes on and I find those errors.**

I just wanted to post this, because as many of you know, people have been debating, discussing, and sometimes are even arguing and fighting about "Thick oil vs Thin oil" on a lot of forums.

I'm here to tell you all that thin oils such as 0w20/0w30 are much better for your engines, instead of 5w30/5w40 etc...

Why are thin oils better? It's not just because it can get better fuel economy out of an engine.

Thin oil are better because it flows quicker. It flows into your bearings quicker, and it also flows out of your bearings quicker. Less dag on moving parts, and quicker heat transfer. Sounds great.

Many people often say "Having higher oil pressure is better", but it isn't always the case. Usually, using thicker oils will give you higher oil pressure and using thinner oils will give you lower oil pressure. The reason why thicker oils give you higher oil pressure is because the oil is, simply put, backing up before it enters an area it needs to go to, because is can't flow into the area it's trying to go in to. Having some oil pressure is good, but trying to get highest oil pressure you can get by using a thicker oil isn't good.

Oil flow is what determines how well an oil will protect your engine from wear, NOT higher oil pressure. If you don't have the most flow possible, you're not gonna get the best wear protection, period. That's why using thinner oils is beneficial, and that's also why 95% of new cars sold today (2022) pretty much use 5w20 or 0w20. Thinner oils are better for your engines.

We also hear people often discuss about how thinner oils won't protect their car in very hot summer days. For this example, we will use 0w20. We have to remember that 0w is the "rating" for when the oil has cooled off. 20 is when the oil is hot. Let's say you are driving your Toyota Camry somewhere up in freezing cold Canada on December and are using 0w20 Synthetic oil. Using 0w oil on startup is very beneficial to your engine, but 0w (usually 45cSt @ 40C/75F) is still far too thick for cold engine protection even on hot summer days, but it's still better than using 5w or 10w. So let's say you have been driving this Toyota Camry for 2 hours (mix city/highway driving) in freezing ambient temp. Your 0w20 oil is fully upto operating temp by now. The oil should be somewhere between 195F-220F. The oil is in it's normal operating temp.

Now let's say you drove this Toyota Camry from Canada to Miami Florida in the middle of August, when it's really hot. Should you now switch to 5w30 or 5w40? No. No. No. You can, but there is no reason to do so because 0w20 will still do a great job. The 0w20 oil temp will be at around 195F-220F even in hot Miami, assuming your car has a properly working cooling system. The 0w20 oil is still in it's normal operating temp, so it's not a problem. Thinner oils will protect your engine even on scorching hot summer days. In fact, thinner oils such as 0w20 will protect your engine better on scorching hot summer days than 5w30 or 5w40, because 0w20 flows quicker and transfers heat away from hot engine internal components faster. Also, using thinner oils such as 0w20 or 0w30 on turbocharged engines that use 5w30 or 5w40 is beneficial to the turbos, because thinner oil will flow quicker and transfer the heat away from the turbo quicker. Many people think because they have a turbo engine, they should step the viscosity up a notch from let's say 5w30 to 5w40, but by doing that, you're actually hurting your turbos by not letting it get cooled off as fast and quickly as possible. I'm not saying using 5w40 on an engine "designed for 5w3" will cause damage to your turbo, but I'm just saying you really should be using 0w30 or even 0w20 is you really want to help your turbos out. By the way, synthetic 0w20 can withstand the heat. The engine won't get hotter because youre running 0w20, so your oil temp will still be absolutely normal even when using 0w20.

If you have a daily driver car that uses 5w20, 5w30, 10w30 or 5w40, you can switch to 0w20 or 0w30. Your engine will not hate you for that. You technically don't even have to use thicker oil even when you're "racing" your car on a race track going flat out. Because, yet again, thinner oils will give you better wear protection. But the reason why you often hear people say "run thicker oil for track use" is because the oil can get too hot and break down. But if you're using a high quality synthetic oil, the oil won't break down, because the additive package will prevent oil from breaking down. If you're tracking your car, md you're worried about the oil, jus go up one notch. You come have to go from 0w30 to 5w50. Jus go upto 0w40, and you will be fine.


But if you're daily driving your car in your daily commute, and you really actually care about protecting your engine from wear, then start using 0w20 or 0w30, no matter what engine you have.

If you are going on forums to see if you should be using a thicker oil than recommend, than I hope you learned that thinner oils are better.
 
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Startup wear for modern vehicles is considered a myth, oil starts flowing immediately if you use the suitable oil for the climate.

We all have different uses, I use 15w40 in my jetta.

0w20 and 5w20 were designed for fuel efficiency, with the AVERAGE driver in mind.

This debate has been a very old one on here. There's some things that are incorrect in your post, maybe search the forums for logical answers...
 
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**Before I begin, I want to say that I might have left some typos and misspelled a couple words. I will fix those as time goes on and I find those errors.**

I just wanted to post this, because as many of you know, people have been debating, discussing, and sometimes are even arguing and fighting about "Thick oil vs Thin oil" on a lot of forums.

I'm here to tell you all that thin oils such as 0w20/0w30 are much better for your engines, instead of 5w30/5w40 etc...

Why are thin oils better? It's not just because it can get better fuel economy out of an engine.

Thin oil are better because it flows quicker. It flows into your bearings quicker, and it also flows out of your bearings quicker. Less dag on moving parts, and quicker heat transfer. Sounds great.

Many people often say "Having higher oil pressure is better", but it isn't always the case. Usually, using thicker oils will give you higher oil pressure and using thinner oils will give you lower oil pressure. The reason why thicker oils give you higher oil pressure is because the oil is, simply put, backing up before it enters an area it needs to go to, because is can't flow into the area it's trying to go in to. Having some oil pressure is good, but trying to get highest oil pressure you can get by using a thicker oil isn't good.

Oil flow is what determines how well an oil will protect your engine from wear, NOT higher oil pressure. If you don't have the most flow possible, you're not gonna get the best wear protection, period. That's why using thinner oils is beneficial, and that's also why 95% of new cars sold today (2022) pretty much use 5w20 or 0w20. Thinner oils are better for your engines.

We also hear people often discuss about how thinner oils won't protect their car in very hot summer days. For this example, we will use 0w20. We have to remember that 0w is the "rating" for when the oil has cooled off. 20 is when the oil is hot. Let's say you are driving your Toyota Camry somewhere up in freezing cold Canada on December and are using 0w20 Synthetic oil. Using 0w oil on startup is very beneficial to your engine, but 0w (usually 45cSt @ 40C/75F) is still far too thick for cold engine protection even on hot summer days, but it's still better than using 5w or 10w. So let's say you have been driving this Toyota Camry for 2 hours (mix city/highway driving) in freezing ambient temp. Your 0w20 oil is fully upto operating temp by now. The oil should be somewhere between 195F-220F. The oil is in it's normal operating temp.

Now let's say you drove this Toyota Camry from Canada to Miami Florida in the middle of August, when it's really hot. Should you now switch to 5w30 or 5w40? No. No. No. You can, but there is no reason to do so because 0w20 will still do a great job. The 0w20 oil temp will be at around 195F-220F even in hot Miami, assuming your car has a properly working cooling system. The 0w20 oil is still in it's normal operating temp, so it's not a problem. Thinner oils will protect your engine even on scorching hot summer days. In fact, thinner oils such as 0w20 will protect your engine better on scorching hot summer days than 5w30 or 5w40, because 0w20 flows quicker and transfers heat away from hot engine internal components faster. Also, using thinner oils such as 0w20 or 0w30 on turbocharged engines that use 5w30 or 5w40 is beneficial to the turbos, because thinner oil will flow quicker and transfer the heat away from the turbo quicker. Many people think because they have a turbo engine, they should step the viscosity up a notch from let's say 5w30 to 5w40, but by doing that, you're actually hurting your turbos by not letting it get cooled off as fast and quickly as possible. I'm not saying using 5w40 on an engine "designed for 5w3" will cause damage to your turbo, but I'm just saying you really should be using 0w30 or even 0w20 is you really want to help your turbos out. By the way, synthetic 0w20 can withstand the heat. The engine won't get hotter because youre running 0w20, so your oil temp will still be absolutely normal even when using 0w20.

If you have a daily driver car that uses 5w20, 5w30, 10w30 or 5w40, you can switch to 0w20 or 0w30. Your engine will not hate you for that. You technically don't even have to use thicker oil even when you're "racing" your car on a race track going flat out. Because, yet again, thinner oils will give you better wear protection. But the reason why you often hear people say "run thicker oil for track use" is because the oil can get too hot and break down. But if you're using a high quality synthetic oil, the oil won't break down, because the additive package will prevent oil from breaking down. If you're tracking your car, md you're worried about the oil, jus go up one notch. You come have to go from 0w30 to 5w50. Jus go upto 0w40, and you will be fine.


But if you're daily driving your car in your daily commute, and you really actually care about protecting your engine from wear, then start using 0w20 or 0w30, no matter what engine you have.

If you are going on forums to see if you should be using a thicker oil than recommend, than I hope you learned that thinner oils are better.
I like 5w40
 
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**Before I begin, I want to say that I might have left some typos and misspelled a couple words. I will fix those as time goes on and I find those errors.**

I just wanted to post this, because as many of you know, people have been debating, discussing, and sometimes are even arguing and fighting about "Thick oil vs Thin oil" on a lot of forums.

I'm here to tell you all that thin oils such as 0w20/0w30 are much better for your engines, instead of 5w30/5w40 etc...

Why are thin oils better? It's not just because it can get better fuel economy out of an engine.

Thin oil are better because it flows quicker. It flows into your bearings quicker, and it also flows out of your bearings quicker. Less dag on moving parts, and quicker heat transfer. Sounds great.

Many people often say "Having higher oil pressure is better", but it isn't always the case. Usually, using thicker oils will give you higher oil pressure and using thinner oils will give you lower oil pressure. The reason why thicker oils give you higher oil pressure is because the oil is, simply put, backing up before it enters an area it needs to go to, because is can't flow into the area it's trying to go in to. Having some oil pressure is good, but trying to get highest oil pressure you can get by using a thicker oil isn't good.

Oil flow is what determines how well an oil will protect your engine from wear, NOT higher oil pressure. If you don't have the most flow possible, you're not gonna get the best wear protection, period. That's why using thinner oils is beneficial, and that's also why 95% of new cars sold today (2022) pretty much use 5w20 or 0w20. Thinner oils are better for your engines.

We also hear people often discuss about how thinner oils won't protect their car in very hot summer days. For this example, we will use 0w20. We have to remember that 0w is the "rating" for when the oil has cooled off. 20 is when the oil is hot. Let's say you are driving your Toyota Camry somewhere up in freezing cold Canada on December and are using 0w20 Synthetic oil. Using 0w oil on startup is very beneficial to your engine, but 0w (usually 45cSt @ 40C/75F) is still far too thick for cold engine protection even on hot summer days, but it's still better than using 5w or 10w. So let's say you have been driving this Toyota Camry for 2 hours (mix city/highway driving) in freezing ambient temp. Your 0w20 oil is fully upto operating temp by now. The oil should be somewhere between 195F-220F. The oil is in it's normal operating temp.

Now let's say you drove this Toyota Camry from Canada to Miami Florida in the middle of August, when it's really hot. Should you now switch to 5w30 or 5w40? No. No. No. You can, but there is no reason to do so because 0w20 will still do a great job. The 0w20 oil temp will be at around 195F-220F even in hot Miami, assuming your car has a properly working cooling system. The 0w20 oil is still in it's normal operating temp, so it's not a problem. Thinner oils will protect your engine even on scorching hot summer days. In fact, thinner oils such as 0w20 will protect your engine better on scorching hot summer days than 5w30 or 5w40, because 0w20 flows quicker and transfers heat away from hot engine internal components faster. Also, using thinner oils such as 0w20 or 0w30 on turbocharged engines that use 5w30 or 5w40 is beneficial to the turbos, because thinner oil will flow quicker and transfer the heat away from the turbo quicker. Many people think because they have a turbo engine, they should step the viscosity up a notch from let's say 5w30 to 5w40, but by doing that, you're actually hurting your turbos by not letting it get cooled off as fast and quickly as possible. I'm not saying using 5w40 on an engine "designed for 5w3" will cause damage to your turbo, but I'm just saying you really should be using 0w30 or even 0w20 is you really want to help your turbos out. By the way, synthetic 0w20 can withstand the heat. The engine won't get hotter because youre running 0w20, so your oil temp will still be absolutely normal even when using 0w20.

If you have a daily driver car that uses 5w20, 5w30, 10w30 or 5w40, you can switch to 0w20 or 0w30. Your engine will not hate you for that. You technically don't even have to use thicker oil even when you're "racing" your car on a race track going flat out. Because, yet again, thinner oils will give you better wear protection. But the reason why you often hear people say "run thicker oil for track use" is because the oil can get too hot and break down. But if you're using a high quality synthetic oil, the oil won't break down, because the additive package will prevent oil from breaking down. If you're tracking your car, md you're worried about the oil, jus go up one notch. You come have to go from 0w30 to 5w50. Jus go upto 0w40, and you will be fine.


But if you're daily driving your car in your daily commute, and you really actually care about protecting your engine from wear, then start using 0w20 or 0w30, no matter what engine you have.

If you are going on forums to see if you should be using a thicker oil than recommend, than I hope you learned that thinner oils are better.
First post after regestering?
Must be a spammer
:unsure:
 
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