Solving V-belt Issues: Dayco GPL Premium V-Belts

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Anyone who knows classic cars knows that most people want a serpentine or flat-belt conversion, and are willing to pay ridiculous prices for nice aftermarket systems, and healthy prices for OEM solutions pulled from the junkyard. This is because V-Belts, the old style used before flat and serpentine belts came along, are notorious for slipping, tearing, squealing, needing tension hazardous to accessory bearings, being difficult to tension, and having short lives. Certain cars (like Pontiac big blocks of the 60's ) were known to throw their belts straight out of the showroom upon first WOT trip. There is a little known solution to this drama. Compressors, lawnmowers, snowblowers, mulchers, and other equipment use V-Belts to drive large components with remarkable amounts of horsepower and torque. An automotive engine certainly produces more power than these applications, but an automotive alternator, AC compressor, or power steering pump certainly takes less horsepower to drive than certain components I've seen driven by a single V-belt in industrial applications. I discovered a long time ago that many auto parts stores have these industrial belts in stock. They're made of aramid fibers (like flexible armoring) as opposed to full rubber composition. I've found that these belts do not stretch, do not require nearly as much tension, last nearly forever, and do not squeal. I consider this mandatory when converting a car to AC that uses a single V-belt to drive the compressor. Also for high amp alternators driven by single V-Belts. I've been using the Dayco GPL premium belts, with no issues. Even on old muscle cars pushing out over 600 hp, I've never had a belt issue. I use them in my lift trucks, boats, trucks, and stationary engines. When I got my first 68 Dodge, I had nothing but problems with the V-Belts. The GPL belts solved all of that. If anyone else is having issues with V-Belts in an older car (or even newer Hondas, from what I've seen), give these a shot. The most recent belt I bought is a Dayco L447, for an old 454 Chevy. One belt driving both water pump/fan and alternator alone. The last two digits are the belt external circumference. Whereas a new Dayco rubber belt was squealing like a pig, even with enough tension to make the belt tight as piano wire; the GPL is silent with less tension. Voltage is now a stable 14.6 at idle. Good luck, and keep rolling. wink
 
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Don't use the cloth covered belts (NAPAs "W" series,Gates 67/68/69 series),those are meant for equipment using a disengagement clutch.The cloth will slip on the pulley vs rubber + pulley.
 
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Originally Posted By: DoubleWasp
Certain cars (like Pontiac big blocks of the 60's ) were known to throw their belts straight out of the showroom upon first WOT trip.
shrug My Dad owned a '63 Tri-Power Bonneville. It was in the family from 1966 to around 1990 and saw WOT all the time. Had to see regular WOT to keep the fuel in the secondaries fresh. It never threw any of the three v-belts (alt, P/S and A/C). A best friend has owned two Firebirds ('68 and '69) since the early '70s and none threw any belts. They're still parked in his garage. Another friend had a '70 GTO in high school. No belts went flying here either.
 
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I work on lots of older stuff and often the vbelts are old and cracked from age but not flying off. My truck has vbelts as did the truck it replaced. I have never seen a problem with vbelts.
 
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to each of their own: V-belts are more forgiving than that of serpentine belts, esp. when the pulleys are slightly out of alignment. Also: V-belts can be easily adjusted and unless you put a gorilla's strength onto the the belt tensioning, which typically leads to either belt overstretched(and snap when you least expected, or kill the bearing such as water pump, PS pump, alternator, etc.) or both. On the other hand: serpentine belts, because it is designed to run true on all the accessories that it pulls (with grooved pulleys of course); it doesn't come with a lot of "give" if there's any slight mis-alignment on the pulley's end. When that happens (some pulleys are off alignment), you'll get all sorts of complaints such as belt chirp/squeal, even for new ones a few months down the road. Also: the quality of belt tensioning is by means of a bearing loaded (either spring + hydraulic) pulley or similar. Unfortunately, when the bearing seized up during operation, it will burn the belt and break it into pieces. Lastly: serpentine belts are designed not to be very forgiving (doesn't stretch much, to say the least). In summary: unless you have a specific issue to overcome (thus the need of converting V-belt systems to serpentine belt), otherwise: haphazardly jumping into the newer belt bandwagon isn't gonna make your life/your car any better, IMO. Q.
 

DoubleWasp

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I posted this for people who are having trouble with a V-belt accessory drive system. Those not having a problem can continue doing what they are doing.
 
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