Rear sway bar bushings and end links replace ??

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I can't believe that at age 66, this is the first rear sway bar bushings/end links I have ever done. (Last 3 Caravans had solid axles).

In replacing both of these parts, is there a sequence and procedure that is standard operating procedure?
1.) Tighten parts with car on jack stands and rear suspension hanging vs. wheels on ground/weight on suspension??
2.) Tighten sway bar to frame bushings first or end links first? Thanks!!

Jeep patriot with this style bushings and end links

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doitmyself

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Hey, slacktide_bitog, cut me some slack, man. My expertise is growing trees, I'm not Clinebarger!!!!! Caravans are such great vehicles they never need bushings, LOL ;)
 
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I dont think you need to tighten the bushings with the weight on the vehicle as the sway bar rotates in the bushing. It shouldn’t matter for the end links either. Just do whatever is easier for you
 
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In general you always want to tighten suspension components with the vehicle at it’s normal ride height. Not doing so may preload the anti roll bar bushings and cause premature failure. And not being at normal ride height may cause the end links in your picture to be tightened at an angle and misaligned in the anti roll bar end.

I suggest backing it up on ramps and fully tightening everything then.

Scott
 
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You'll want to replace the bar mounting bushings first and make sure there is free movement before you put the end links on. They shouldn't bind or be hard to move. Depending on the material, might even need lubed for free movement. You can do that up in the air, no reason to have the car on the ground for it, but you will want it on the ground to finish tightening the end links as others have mentioned.
 
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I dont think you need to tighten the bushings with the weight on the vehicle as the sway bar rotates in the bushing. It shouldn’t matter for the end links either. Just do whatever is easier for you
Not all anti rolls bars rotate, per se, inside the bushing.

For a rubber bushing the anti roll bar should not rotate in the bushing. Instead it should twist the bushing when it rotates. In fact, many rubber bushings come from the factory bonded to the anti roll bar. This prevents them from squeaking and failing prematurely.

If the bushing is polyurethane the anti roll bar is designed to rotate inside the bushing hole but must be lubed to prevent binding and squeaks.

In short, if the bushings are rubber, tighten them with the vehicle at normal ride height. And be sure to thoroughly clean the anti roll bar where the bushing resides. The anti roll bar must be spotless and totally free of all oil, grease, etc. when rubber bushings are used. And ideally a rubber bushing should be bonded to the anti roll bar at normal ride height using an adhesive designed for this particular purpose.

Scott
 
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Not all anti rolls bars rotate, per se, inside the bushing.

For a rubber bushing the anti roll bar should not rotate in the bushing. Instead it should twist the bushing when it rotates. In fact, many rubber bushings come from the factory bonded to the anti roll bar. This prevents them from squeaking and failing prematurely.

If the bushing is polyurethane the anti roll bar is designed to rotate inside the bushing hole but must be lubed to prevent binding and squeaks.

In short, if the bushings are rubber, tighten them with the vehicle at normal ride height. And be sure to thoroughly clean the anti roll bar where the bushing resides. The anti roll bar must be spotless and totally free of all oil, grease, etc. when rubber bushings are used. And ideally a rubber bushing should be bonded to the anti roll bar at normal ride height using an adhesive designed for this particular purpose.

Scott
Where did you get this this info? It is mostly incorrect info for these types of bushings. Never bond one of these bushing to the sway bar.

This will give you a good general idea.
 

doitmyself

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Thank you everyone for the input. For something so simple, the conflicting advice on the web is substantial: loaded/unloaded weight, grease/no grease (and type), poly vs. rubber,etc..

Trav, I also read somewhere on the interweb the same thing as slo town states (trying to find it).
 
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Where did you get this this info? It is mostly incorrect info for these types of bushings. Never bond one of these bushing to the sway bar.

This will give you a good general idea.

Trav, I'm talking about the bushings that the anti roll bar passes through, not the end links. And just to be clear, I'm referring to rubber bushings, not polyurethane.

The OEM factory anti roll bars, both front and rear, on both our BMWs had OEM bushings that were bonded to the bar. The bars do not turn inside the bore of the bushing, they twist the bushing itself because they are glued to it. In my service manuals it actually mentions this and tells the reader which type/brand of adhesive to use when installing new bushings.

Scott

Edit: I found it. The adhesive is called "Circolight". It's in both my E46 and E90 my manuals and is supposedly part of a BMW TIS. You put it on the bushing, install the bushing (properly oriented so it's not preloaded at normal ride height), and let it set and cure before installing on the vehicle. Apparently Circolight is difficult to source. The internet says others have used mineral spirits instead, which seems to partially activate the rubber so the inside bore of bushing adheres to the anti roll bar.
 
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This is not a BMW, MB or some other Euro cars and that info is not applicable to this application, not all BMW and MB bushings are bonded either. Different cars have different requirements.

This is a MB TSB to address a noise issue. Note that they do no not bond the bar to the mount only the mount to the bracket, again a different requirement for a specific issue. Citroen uses a completely different method, but no matter, the bar the OP has does not have any special requirements.

 

doitmyself

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Trav "the bar the OP has does not have any special requirements."

Agreed. Taking my own thread off topic a bit, here is a presentation that discusses conventional (slip) sway bar bushings and bonded (no slip) ones:
Maybe stating that ALL rubber bushings (vs. poly) are designed to not allow the sway bar to slip is painting with too broad a paint brush?

EDIT: If we wish to pursue this academic debate, here are two threads with lengthy debate regarding whether sway bar bushings should grip the bar tight with no slip vs. allowing slip.
 
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As I said in my previous post different applications have different requirements. Duplicate what you remove, if they just split and just pull off the bar then you need nothing on the bar or bracket. Do not confuse vehicle specific procedures as applicable to other vehicles and vice versa.
When in doubt consult the FSM.
 
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Agreed. Taking my own thread off topic a bit, here is a presentation that discusses conventional (slip) sway bar bushings and bonded (no slip) ones:
Maybe stating that ALL rubber bushings (vs. poly) are designed to not allow the sway bar to slip is painting with too broad a paint brush?

EDIT: If we wish to pursue this academic debate, here are two threads with lengthy debate regarding whether sway bar bushings should grip the bar tight with no slip vs. allowing slip.
The last time I bought Moog bushings they were made in India and looked worse than anything that came out of China. I didnt use them but threw them in the bin and bought OE, yes it makes a difference. On my Beetle I used the street formula from Powerflex, no harshness in the ride but they have lasted unchanged for years. Expensive yes but you get what you pay for, forget the energy suspension, it is cheap discount parts store nasty crap.

 
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Thank you everyone for the input. For something so simple, the conflicting advice on the web is substantial: loaded/unloaded weight, grease/no grease (and type), poly vs. rubber,etc..

Trav, I also read somewhere on the interweb the same thing as slo town states (trying to find it).
If you use lubricant use something that wont swell or soften the rubber. You can use silicone grease.
 
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depending on the age, the patriot is a mitsubishi outalnder underneath. the sway bar rotates in the bushings and the end links are ball joints that roate aswell. Whichever method is simplest to replace the bushings. I used a ceramic paste in the bushings to prevent squeaking, usually the sway bar has worn smooth inside the bushings and they tend to get noisy with moisture after replacement.
 
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