Oil For Firemen

Messages
1
Location
NY
I just purchased a 2003 Pontiac Grand Am GT and live in NY where it is winter. Since I want the most out of my car for years to come, I want to know what Oil is the BEST to use. I am a volunteer fireman, so when getting a fire call I don't have time to "warm up the car". I have to go into my car in freezing temps, start it up and then put the pedal to the metal right away. When my Fire Pager goes off, lives are at stake whether it be an actual fire or an Ambulance Call for help. What Oil should I use and how often should I change it? Thanks for you help!!!
 
Messages
1,871
Location
.
The Fire Guy [Welcome!] Over the counter oils: Mobil1 0w-30 in winter and summer Mailorder oils: Amsoil 0w-30 in winter and summer Just my opinion, Mark
 
Messages
425
A nice new car should get nice new oil! When you say "the best", I guess "best in category" would serve well to point out the various aspects. "THE" oil currently is "GC" or German-Made Castrol Syntec 0w-30(red label, AutoZone only). If you want to crank it and go in 20 below, the GC is the way to go. Seriously, you have to let you car warm up gradually...before you accelerate hard. A litte ease on the gas will do your car more good than ANY oil. Basicly, if you want a dino oil and change it 3000-5000 miles, Chevron Supreme, Pennzoil and the old-time favourite Castrol GTX are prefered. Valvoline and mystery discount oils are frowned upon, so are most additives. The in-between oils are blended synthetics, Penzoil HMV (a part synthetic) and Castrol Syntec Blend are both great for the few extra $s. One you might like is Penzoil SUV formula, "Time Released Additives" sounds good. In warm temps or a heated garage, diesel-formula oils are long-lasting, 15w-40 Pennzoil Long-Life does what it says on the label. Synthetic diesel oils are another option, Mobil Delvac 1 or I use Shell Rotella T Synth 5w-40, a bargain at Wal*Mart for $3.75q The only Mobil 1 to mess with is 0w-40. Any of these oils are good for 6 month change intervals, I would adjust quality of your oil to the number of miles driven in 6 months. 3000-5000 or so: use dino oil, 6000-9000 miles: use a high quality synthetic or HDEO (diesel) oil.
 
Messages
35
Location
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Hey, "The Fire Guy"... As advised above, and from experience, use the best synthetic you can get / afford (GC 0W30, M1 0W30 / 5W30, etc). Use your block heater, and invest in a remote car starter...start your vehicle while you're pulling your coveralls on! Stay safe, Fire Fighter! Rod Retired Fire Chief
 

TC

Messages
1,644
Location
California
Two choices: Synthetic (any good brand) or Pennzoil Multigrade dino if you want a less expensive option. Either should work fine. Pennzoil's 5w-30 Pour Point is an impressive -44F, while the next best popular brands are Kendall GT-1 at -40F, and Valvoline All Climate, Mobil Drive Clean, and Union 76, all at -38F. On the other hand, Quaker State Peak Performance is -27F. Pennzoil 5w-20 also has an edge over its competitors, while Pennzoil 10w-30 does not. While many brands don't list their Borderline Pumping Temperature, Pennzoil 5w-30 does, and it is -31F. So you'd be protected well below zero F with this oil. Keep in mind that in consistently cold weather (even above 0 degrees F), the pour point depressant additives are used up fairly quickly. As these additives are used up, the pour point of the oil rises. In addition, after the engine heats up, the oil is subjected to high temperature conditions that burn off the lighter components in the oil, causing it to thicken, further increasing the pour point. Therefore I'd shorten your winter oil change intervals well below 7,500 mi or whatever GM is recommending. FYI... Pour Point: This is 5 degrees F above the point at which a chilled oil shows no movement at the surface for 5 seconds when inclined. Borderline Pumping Temperature: A measure of the lowest temperature at which an engine oil can be continuously and adequately supplied to the oil pump inlet of a passenger car engine, with the oil pump maintaining adequate oil pressure. Cold Cranking Viscosity: Simulates the viscosity of an oil in crankshaft bearings when trying to start during a cold winter morning. The test is important in determining if an engine can be cranked over fast enough, when very cold, to start. Conventional oil spec's: http://theoildrop.server101.com/cgi/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=1;t=003925 [ December 03, 2003, 02:29 AM: Message edited by: TC ]
 
Messages
43,648
Location
'Stralia
something with a multi function additive package (Moly, Boron, and Zinc) that will function in all of the temperature ranges that will occur as the engine heats up. Something with heaps of esters that "cling" to the metal, and keep as much of a film as possible to minimise start-up wear. Maybe redline ?? Molakule will hopefully give a better answer.
 

mdv

Messages
531
Location
MA
quote:
Originally posted by The Fire Guy: I just purchased a 2003 Pontiac Grand Am GT and live in NY where it is winter. Since I want the most out of my car for years to come, I want to know what Oil is the BEST to use. I am a volunteer fireman, so when getting a fire call I don't have time to "warm up the car". I have to go into my car in freezing temps, start it up and then put the pedal to the metal right away. When my Fire Pager goes off, lives are at stake whether it be an actual fire or an Ambulance Call for help. What Oil should I use and how often should I change it? Thanks for you help!!!
My buddy is a volunteer as well. I have him running Amsoil's Series 3000 5W-30. After talking with him, we compromised toward more extended drain capability with the shorter trips. Otherwise, the Series 2000 0W-30 would be better for cold startup. The remote start idea is a good one, as well. I would never consider a dino oil in these applications either. A high quality synthetic is the best way to go IMHO if you want a long trouble free life out of the car.
 
Messages
220
Location
NH
Use a synthetic for cold starts as others prescribe. If its really cold, just take off gradually not flooring it, it won't make that significant of time whether you accelerate 0-60 in 10 seconds or in 20-30 seconds for a 0-60 time. I would not worry too much as you probably won't have a lot of times that it actually occurs anyway with a stone cold motor and in the dead of winter. New cars don't require warm up just easy driving until engine is up to temp. good luck
 
Messages
1,381
Location
Southeast Kentucky
Fire Guy... [Welcome!] I use Mobil1 0w20 in my Ranger in the winter as its the vehicle I drive to fire calls and its not garaged. My truck calls for a 20 wt but for you, Mobil1 0w30 would be perfect for winter and Mobil1 5w30 or 10w30 for summer. Stay safe, brother.
 
Messages
310
Location
Northern California
As a poster above said, Mobil 1 0w-30, mostly just because it is easily obtained (unlike german castrol). Also as said above, the best thing you can do, is give the car at least a minute or two before you give it full throttle. Get going right away, but don't run full throttle or high rpm for a couple of minutes if at all possible. Even then it is not best to floor it when not fully warmed up, but far better when partially warm than dead cold. Cary
 
Messages
3,094
Location
Metro Detroit
I thought this was pointed out, but I can't seem to find it now. Oils have their limits. They can't, for instance, make up for the fact that metal is much more brittle at sub-zero temperatures. Therefore, you'll get a lot more wear on a very cold start with any oil, especially it you punch it right away. As the others have said, it is advisable to take it easy and not go to WOT while the engine is stone cold. Having said that, I don't think anyone could or would blame you for risking your car for the sake of someone's life. Given that, I would recommend, as many others have, a good 0w-30 synthetic, like GC or Mobil 1. I also really like the block heater idea. That'll keep the metal warmer and less brittle, which will substantially reduce wear. Good luck with your new car.
 
Messages
22,188
Location
Colorado Springs
Seeing as how Mobil 1 made my 99 Grand Am GT sound like a tractor with severe piston slap, I can't recomend it for your application. I would go with Amsoil ASL 5w-30 and change it when the oil change moniter says to and never think about it again. If you go with dino, I wouldn't trust that oil moniter too much. I only drove my car in short trip driving conditions, and even in cold weather, it would still not go off until about 5500 miles.
 
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