Mushrooms invading my lawn

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39,801
Location
Great Lakes
It's been raining quite a bit lately, and my lawn is now full of these guys... I've read that there isn't really much you can do to get rid of them without also harming the grass. Is that really the case? Anything I can do to get rid of this nuisance? I have also read that they tend to appear if you have thatch. I mulch when I mow (once a week), yet still, it looks like I do have some thatch going on there.
 

Kestas

Staff member
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13,825
Location
The Motor City
One thing I've read is that they will grow where there is an overabundance of rotted organic material, such as decaying wood, a forest floor, and thatch.
 
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23,591
 Originally Posted By: PandaBear
Check if they are poisonous (feed it to something first), and if not, you know what to do.
Go ahead and try them yourself.
 
Messages
23,591
 Originally Posted By: Quattro Pete
It's been raining quite a bit lately, and my lawn is now full of these guys...
Pete, those mushrooms are merely the fruiting bodies of the fungus which lives underground. You can't destroy the fungus by removing or killing the mushrooms. You are pretty much stuck with them.
 
Messages
5,215
Location
Houston, Tx, USA
Take one and pinch the stem. Wait 1 minute. If the place where you pinched turned purple, eat 3-4 caps and wait about 2 hours. Really though, I don't think there's much you can do here.
 

Quattro Pete

Thread starter
Messages
39,801
Location
Great Lakes
 Originally Posted By: Pete591
Backdown on the nitrogen
How? I don't feed the lawn anything.
 Quote:
and water during the day not at night.
I'll be sure to talk to g_o_d about that. :) Seriously though, I don't water the lawn at all. It's just all the rain we've been getting lately...
 
Messages
43,650
Location
'Stralia
You might have them for a few years, and then whatever they like so much this year will be depleted, and they'll go away for (possibly a long) time.
 
Messages
3,202
Location
Far North East Texas
You need a 7-yr old boy with a stick. "See those little space invaders all over the yard? I bet you can't knock 'em all down!" In a day or two there won't be a mushroom in sight. ;\)
 
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Messages
1,243
Location
arkansas
Contact your county extension agent and he can tell you the best way to deal with them. I contact the one in our area about all kinds of things --- my tomatoe plants, bugs and tree problems.
 
Messages
2,149
Location
USA
Climate humidity, temp and moisture will cause lawn mushrooms to spring out. Actually mushrooms are a good sign of a healthy lawn but mother nature has her thing. Not usual weather pattern usually when mushrooms occur. Fungi needs to feed and just the right humidity, moisture and temp with organic matter enables the fungi to feed heavier. "Lawn mushrooms are a common landscaping problem. For many people who pride themselves on having nice looking grass, discovering mushrooms in lawn can be frustrating. But the problem of mushrooms growing in the lawn can be easily fixed if you know how. What causes mushrooms to grow on a lawn? The first thing to understand is what causes mushrooms to grow on a lawn. Lawn mushrooms are a fungus and this fungus has the job of helping to breakdown decaying organic material. Unfortunately, in the average yard, there are plenty of sources of decaying organic material. Animal waste, old mulch and grass clippings can all spread and feed lawn mushrooms. Why are mushrooms growing on MY lawn? The next thing to look at is why are mushrooms growing on my lawn. Examine the state of your lawn. Lawn mushrooms like damp, shaded and organic waste rich environments. Is it possible that you have a drainage problem which contributes to the lawn mushroom problem? Do you have organic waste that should be removed? Are there areas of your yard that are very shady? Eliminate Mushrooms in Lawn To eliminate mushrooms in the lawn you need to correct the problems that you have in your yard. If the lawn is too wet, are there things you can to reduce the moisture. Raking your grass clippings, dethatching your lawn or replacing old mulch will help to reduce the decaying organic material that encourages mushrooms growing in lawn. If your yard is too shady, see if some prudent and targeted pruning or thinning of surrounding trees can help to send more light into your yard. You can also treat your lawn with a fungicide, but if you do not address the issues that cause mushrooms to grow in your lawn, chances are that the mushrooms will just come back. You can leave mushrooms growing in the lawn While mushrooms in the lawn may look unsightly, they are actually beneficial to the lawn. The extensive root system of lawn mushrooms help the soil retain water and lawn mushrooms also help to break down organic materials which help add nutrients to the lawn. Once you have answered the question of why are mushrooms growing on my lawn, you can make the decision as to whether or not to eliminate mushrooms in lawn." [url=http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/eliminate-mushrooms-in-your-lawn.htm][/url]
 
Messages
5,570
Location
New Zealand
 Originally Posted By: Quattro Pete
How? I don't feed the lawn anything.
If you are mulching and not using a catcher,you are feeding the lawn.People around here mow close with a catcher every week,their lawns are nearly dead....I don't use a catcher and mow about once a month,my grass is thick and green....but looks a mess.Sometimes I have mushrooms,I don't worry about them.If they look good,I eat them.
 
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Messages
43,650
Location
'Stralia
yeah mate, I have re silk's post...monoculture is not a sign of a healthy system. British horse trainers, who have been successful for centuries would be miffed at the suggestion that there were no weeds.
 
Messages
3,346
Location
Clarksville, Tennessee
There are 2 things that break down organic matter. Bacteria and Fungi. I wonder if you increase the bacteria in your yard it will compete with the fungi and you will have less of it. Fungi is more prone to woods and leaves, bacteria is more prone to open soil dirt. With all this rain we have been having, I would think that maybe it's too moist and humid for good bacteria growth. Anyhow with all that being said, Bacteria and Fungi are good things to have in the soil, that means you don't have a lot of chemicals, the natural process of organic breakdown is the best you can get.
 
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