List motor oils based viscosity index?

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Is there a current list of motor oils based on Viscosity Index? I hope that question makes sense. Thank you!
 
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Ladies and Gents-- don't strain the nats, pour in what the Manufacturer said to use,,,tain't no easier than that, u-think.....
 
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Nice winter reading. Better winter starting. Ive seen it before, HERE, maybe a couple years ago. Maybe only on 20 grades. 30 Grade? Eneos Sustina might be the winner.
 
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The data I see which may be extracted from this is maybe it would give us a peak of the quality of basestocks which is really not useful in the daily driver.
 
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Originally Posted by Onetor
Is there a current list of motor oils based on Viscosity Index? I hope that question makes sense. Thank you!
Best I've ever seen is an SN, GF-5 0w-20 called "Eneos Racing Street" http://www.eneos.us/wp-content/uplo...TREET-0W-20-Product-Data-Sheet_0418b.pdf ... I use it now for winter in a hybrid. Forget the "racing" word in the name; marketing; its an SN GF-5 cert. 900 ppm moly is a record for a street oil too. VI = 239
 
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Onetor

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Originally Posted by oil_film_movies
Originally Posted by Onetor
Is there a current list of motor oils based on Viscosity Index? I hope that question makes sense. Thank you!
Best I've ever seen is an SN, GF-5 0w-20 called "Eneos Racing Street" http://www.eneos.us/wp-content/uplo...TREET-0W-20-Product-Data-Sheet_0418b.pdf ... I use it now for winter in a hybrid. Forget the "racing" word in the name; marketing; its an SN GF-5 cert. 900 ppm moly is a record for a street oil too. VI = 239
WOW!
 
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The data I see which may be extracted from this is maybe it would give us a peak of the quality of basestocks which is really not useful in the daily driver.
 
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Originally Posted by dave1251
The data I see which may be extracted from this is maybe it would give us a peak of the quality of basestocks which is really not useful in the daily driver.
Unless you care about reducing startup wear on a cool or cold morning, and if you care about fuel economy during warmup. Performance.
 
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Startup wear on cool/cold morning...again, how ? 0W isn't needed until quite a few 10s of degrees below zero. "cool" mornings, 10W, 15W, and 20W will not increase wear...with a PD pump, well into the pumpable range, they all get there at the same time.
 
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Originally Posted by Shannow
Startup wear on cool/cold morning...again, how ?...0W isn't needed until quite a few 10s of degrees below zero...."cool" mornings, 10W, 15W, and 20W will not increase wear...with a PD pump, well into the pumpable range, they all get there at the same time.
No, VII only works at warm to hot temperatures, increases visc there. Remember 0w20 is made with thinner base oils than 5w20. Also, there was a study showing that as long as startup visc is different, startup wear is different. That engineering study already refuted debunked remarks by you in another thread, yet there you go again. ...0w20 and 5w20 differ in visc below about room temperature as the VII becomes less effective.
 
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Originally Posted by oil_film_movies
Originally Posted by Shannow
Startup wear on cool/cold morning...again, how ?...0W isn't needed until quite a few 10s of degrees below zero...."cool" mornings, 10W, 15W, and 20W will not increase wear...with a PD pump, well into the pumpable range, they all get there at the same time.
No, VII only works at warm to hot temperatures, increases visc there. Remember 0w20 is made with thinner base oils than 5w20. Also, there was a study showing that as long as startup visc is different, startup wear is different. That engineering study already refuted debunked remarks by you in another thread, yet there you go again. ...0w20 and 5w20 differ in visc below about room temperature as the VII becomes less effective.
From another thread, so we can use an actual engineering test set to settle the less wear at startup due to better lower viscosity argument:
Originally Posted by NGRhodes
Originally Posted by Ducked
Originally Posted by NGRhodes
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1108/00368790010352691 "This study has demonstrated a correlation between relative average cylinder liner wear rates at low engine start-up temperatures, base oil composition and oil viscosity" Emphasis mine.
So I have to pay 32 USD to read that and then if I'm convinced I have to buy "full synthetic SAE 5W40 grade oils based on Polyalphaolefin"", and a diesel truck. Ooer! Just as well cold starts mean 10C here.
Engine Test procedure [Linked Image] "measurements were performed by AEA at Harwell using a germanium spectrometer" "Five cold/hot start engine test cycles were run on each test oil" "data measured for each of plotted as cumulative wear against each appropriate cold start cycle" "Differences greater than 10 per cent in the relative average wear rate can be regarded as significant. For each test oil, no additional wear was detected after the five hot engine start test phases." Relative cold start wear rates (-21C) vs. CCS viscosities of test oils at -21C [Linked Image] Relative cold start wear rates (-21C) vs. scanning Brookfield (SB) viscosities of test oils at -21C [Linked Image] Relative cold start wear rates (-21C) vs. time (secs) for initial oil gallery pressure rise at -21C [Linked Image] Relative cold start wear rates ( -26C) vs. CCS viscosities of test oils at -26C [Linked Image]
 

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I trust that data. -21 C and -26 C are extremely cold. The question it does not answer is what would the results be if done at temperatures of -10 C up to 100 C in steps of 10 C.
 
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Originally Posted by JAG
I trust that data. -21 C and -26 C are extremely cold. The question it does not answer is what would the results be if done at temperatures of -10 C up to 100 C in steps of 10 C.
There will still be a diffference. A smaller and smaller difference as temperature goes up. Diminishing difference. Untill viscosity is equal, at which point wear is the same.
 

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Originally Posted by oil_film_movies
Originally Posted by JAG
I trust that data. -21 C and -26 C are extremely cold. The question it does not answer is what would the results be if done at temperatures of -10 C up to 100 C in steps of 10 C.
There will still be a diffference. A smaller and smaller difference as temperature goes up. Diminishing difference. Untill viscosity is equal, at which point wear is the same.
Perhaps. It is logical, but I've seen too much data to trust that that is how the results would trend. Nature is complicated. It is better to not presume than to presume and possibly be wrong.
 
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https://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/4901760/1

liner wear.jpg
 
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Originally Posted by oil_film_movies
Originally Posted by dave1251
The data I see which may be extracted from this is maybe it would give us a peak of the quality of basestocks which is really not useful in the daily driver.
Unless you care about reducing startup wear on a cool or cold morning, and if you care about fuel economy during warmup. Performance.
Pfff. Everything you have stated is beyond miniscule in two PCMO's in the same grade with same certifications. It really is statistical noise.
 
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re what happens at "cool" temperatures...-21 is something that's ... cold Here's Rocker Arm Oiling Time and Time to full oil pressure showing what happens with PD pumps, "W" grades, and temperature. The mechanical time to shoft the air, and get to pressure relies on the pumpability of the oil at the temperature,...the mechanical process of shifting that oil is straight volume moved to volume filled. The SAE30 at freezing temps indicates the limits...can't do it at 10F...the 5W20 replicaes that performance at 12F, not so good at -11F. But replace the SAE30/freezing with 5W20, and mechanically it won't get there any sooner.

Oil gallery fill and rocker time.JPG
 
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Originally Posted by oil_film_movies
Originally Posted by Shannow
Startup wear on cool/cold morning...again, how ?...0W isn't needed until quite a few 10s of degrees below zero...."cool" mornings, 10W, 15W, and 20W will not increase wear...with a PD pump, well into the pumpable range, they all get there at the same time.
No, VII only works at warm to hot temperatures, increases visc there. Remember 0w20 is made with thinner base oils than 5w20. Also, there was a study showing that as long as startup visc is different, startup wear is different. That engineering study already refuted debunked remarks by you in another thread, yet there you go again. ...0w20 and 5w20 differ in visc below about room temperature as the VII becomes less effective.
You are really getting worked up on possible .00000001 of wear.
 
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