How does the PowerCore filter work?

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Detroit, MI
I'm looking at this filter, and it looks like a roll of corrugated cardboard. I looked on Donaldson's website, and I still don't understand how this thing filters. Can give me a laymans idea of how this thing is actually filtering?
 
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The holes are sealed on either end alternately. On the holes that are open to dirty air, it goes in, goes through the long side of the hole (the tube) to an adjacent hole that is only open on the engine side.
 
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Johnny248

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It just seems weird that there is no actual element that the air passes through to trap dirt. It seems like it is just a maze of air passages.
 

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Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: Johnny248
It just seems weird that there is no actual element that the air passes through to trap dirt. It seems like it is just a maze of air passages.
There is: It is the wall of the passages. The idea is quite brilliant.
 
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Bolivia
The tecnology is simple. The air goes in one channel and cannot go out, so it has to change directions, passing through a thin wall of fiber. The dust is heavier than the air, so it goes straight and gets caught at the end. The air that changed direction is cleaner, drops off a little more in the fiber, and continues out the other end. Here is a picture of that corrugation stretched out. This is the one that Ford uses on some truck models. I have a small video on this page if you don't mind the spanish narration. PowerCore Video Something seems to have happened to the larger version. Always something to fix. Especially when installed in the kit for off-road, they are fantastic and the last filter you will ever buy. It combines 12 little fixed turbines to separate the first 95% of the dirt. Again apologizing for the Spanish, on this page you can see 7 installations in different vehicles that spend their time in the dust. from what they've done in the last 2 years, I guess the elements need changing every 2 million miles or so in the worst conditions. PowerCore installations
 

Johnny248

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I guess I understand it. I guess it's just different because it is unlike any other filter. The Volant box says this filter is good for 100k. It doesn't look like you could ever tell how dirty it actually is. It is safe to actually just plan of replacing it after 100k? Or should it be done sooner?
 
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Just plan on replacing at 100k/4 years unless you drive through really dusty conditions a lot. If you're in really dusty conditions then put a restriction gauge on the intake to show you when to change it.
 
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I should also note that the 'sealed for life' air filter system Ford used on the Focus for a time is a Powercore element inside a sealed box. I read the testing report on it and they also had a prototype system installed in a fleet of CVs for testing as well. Its really too bad that stupid ingrained stuff like changing air filters all the time usually ends up mitigating the benefits of the design. I have changed so many good 6.0PSD powercores its sickening.
 
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Johnny248

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Originally Posted By: Colt45ws
I should also note that the 'sealed for life' air filter system Ford used on the Focus for a time is a Powercore element inside a sealed box. I read the testing report on it and they also had a prototype system installed in a fleet of CVs for testing as well. Its really too bad that stupid ingrained stuff like changing air filters all the time usually ends up mitigating the benefits of the design. I have changed so many good 6.0PSD powercores its sickening.
I was looking at a PSD Power Core Filter at the store. Looks pretty impressive. Aside from the restriction gauge, is there any actual way to tell if they are need of changing?
 
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You'll lose power, of course, but the restriction gauge is the BEST way to tell if ANY air filer is ready for replacement. The general rule of thumb is to replace a filter when the restriction increases 2.5 kPa (0.75" mercury) over the stock clean filter reading (checked at WOT). Donaldson may have a particular spec for their filter and many engine manufacturers will have one too. Filters have enough area for an overage in flow to account for dirt load but when that excess is used up, it starts cutting into power. Gas engine fuel economy is not effected much by a dirty filter in normal driving (EFI engines mainly) as evidenced by the study linked to below. Air Filter & FE
 
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Here is a better copy of the video. Still in Spanish, but better resolution. My English version is too big to upload. Bigger version of PowerCore video Put the restriction gauge in and you will see more than 4 years. usually 25" water column, which is about 1 psi. The one I tore apart for the picture above had been on an F350 for 5 years and he said that was long enough. It wasn't even 10% full. If you want to weigh them you can. They hold 1600 grams (3.5 lbs) plus tare weight. The one on that 6.0 Powerstroke F550 came on it when I bought it 4 years ago. I don't know how long it had been there.
 
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Location
Colorado
Originally Posted By: Johnny248
It just seems weird that there is no actual element that the air passes through to trap dirt. It seems like it is just a maze of air passages.
Thats what all filters are. A powercore works exactly the same as the diesel particulate filters in the exhaust of modern pickups and trucks.
 
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