Grease recommendation for cold

Messages
74
Location
Niceville, FL
Hello, I have an 04 Chevy Duramax and a 10 Chevy Suburban. The military has decided that I need to live in Fairbanks AK. I'm getting ready for my second winter, and during my first winter I noticed that I had gobs of grease in the garage floor. My guess is that the extreme cold (-50 and colder) does something to the grease to push it out. So I come the the professionals to ask what grease do you recommend. Last winter I used Mobil 1 syn. Was thinking about Amsoil, but wasn't sure if I need Poly NLGI#2, or the multi use NLGI#2. I also looked at the S2000, but wasn't sure if I needed that or not. Thanks in advance! Kevin
 
Messages
674
Location
Gilbert, AZ
My situation is a bit different then your. I deal with extreme heat. With many greases I have a simliar problem as you had last winter. 3 greases I have had really good luck with not seperating in the extremes have been Redline, Amsoil Multi NLGI#2 and Green Grease. I dont have a Lot of grease points so i dont need the large tubes. green Grease has mini tubes, but I have refilled mini tubes with Red Line. it's a PITA though
 
Messages
2,219
Location
CA
If you have a local NAPA store they probably can make a more informed recommendation. Grease is oil suspended in a soft solid. Your existing grease is probably frozen (the oil becomes solid at low temperatures) and breaks out as if it's cracked ice, rather than lubricating. If you had an aircraft then MIL-G-23827B (like Aeroshell 7) would be a good spec for low-temp grease. For an auto, you would likely overpay for all the traceability that goes into airframe maintenance. But, here's at least a story about someone deciding which grease to use for different airframe parts, as well as cautions about not mixing different types of grease, or else they form acid: http://www.seqair.com/skunkworks/Maintenance/Lubricants/Lubricants.html Landing gear is in an unheated part of the aircraft. It's pretty cold at 40k feet (-67F).
 
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Messages
4,574
Location
Merritt Island FL, USA
A PAO based grease (like Amsoil's offerings) will be your best bet in the cold. Ester based greases tend to do much better in extreme heat. I would go with the Amsoil NLG-1 grease. NLG-1 grease is more apt for cold thus I would imagine Amsoil uses more PAO content in it.
 
Messages
10,611
Location
Las Vegas NV
Amsoil's General Purpose and Racing greases both show very good low temp spec's. Either should well. Cat also makes a purpose built low temp grease.
 

KevinsDMAX

Thread starter
Messages
74
Location
Niceville, FL
When into Napa and they sold many types of grease and they had Amsoil GP, but not the Racing. That leads be to believe that that would be a better option, plus I will save a few bills. Thanks all Kevin
 
Messages
961
Location
Ohio
Originally Posted By: KevinsDMAX
When into Napa and they sold many types of grease and they had Amsoil GP, but not the Racing. That leads be to believe that that would be a better option, plus I will save a few bills. Thanks all Kevin
Looks like you've already picked your grease so hope it goes well; here is a couple of suggestions for future considerations: -PAO grease (aka synthetics made from PolyAlphaOlyphins) are good for cold temperatures. -NLGI grades 0-1 are made with thinner base oils and also can help with cold operability -Clay base greases have the lowest operating levels I have seen (as low as -80 C) Calcium sulphonate greases when mixed with PAO also have good low temp operability and better reversibility (aka stay in better) but are pricey. any grease with a combination of the above will work.
 
Messages
476
Location
Virginia
The M1 synthetic grease is one of the thinnest greases I have seen. It also flows well at low temperatures. I would not use it in a warm climate. Did it not work out last year?
 
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