Fuel Pump Failure Mode

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I've replaced exactly ONE fuel pump on a personal vehicle... out of 30+ contestants. I'd say I average 3 fuel pump jobs a year, and I work at a BUSY shop. Sure, they fail, but not nearly as often as many other typical components that utilize electric motors. HVAC blower motors come to mind...
 
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D60

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They're mostly off the road now but Ford EEC-IV pumps were also terrible for reliability. If you got 100k you were doing really well.

The worst thing about them was that they wouldn't just fail. Quite often they'd get warm and then get flakey. Let the vehicle sit overnight and all seemed perfect again until they got warm again.

For my personal vehicles I've had fuel pump failure on an '88 Ranger, '90 Bronco, '95 F250, '02 Silverado 1500 and '03 Suburban 2500. All were purchased used so not sure *I* am the common denominator.

I replaced the pump proactively on my '11 F350 6.2 at 150k with another Motorcraft. That's one vehicle where I CANNOT be stranded if I can reasonably avoid it, and the R&R was reasonable in my estimation.
 

George7941

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The worst thing about them was that they wouldn't just fail. Quite often they'd get warm and then get flakey. Let the vehicle sit overnight and all seemed perfect again until they got warm again.
That would be a good thing, at least you are getting some warning. You could let the pump cool and then make it home withlout getting stranded.
 
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They're mostly off the road now but Ford EEC-IV pumps were also terrible for reliability. If you got 100k you were doing really well.

Maybe it was the supplier Ford used back in the EEC-IV days. There is no such thing as an "EEC-IV" fuel pump. For example, the fuel pump used in the 1988 Mustang 5.0 fits Ford vehicles all the way up to 1997; EEC-IV ended in 1995.. And the fuel pump used in my 1998 Nissan Frontier, also fits many Ford vehicles, some as old as 1988, and Ford and Nissan vehicles as new as 2004.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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They're mostly off the road now but Ford EEC-IV pumps were also terrible for reliability. If you got 100k you were doing really well.

The worst thing about them was that they wouldn't just fail. Quite often they'd get warm and then get flakey. Let the vehicle sit overnight and all seemed perfect again until they got warm again.

For my personal vehicles I've had fuel pump failure on an '88 Ranger, '90 Bronco, '95 F250, '02 Silverado 1500 and '03 Suburban 2500. All were purchased used so not sure *I* am the common denominator.

I replaced the pump proactively on my '11 F350 6.2 at 150k with another Motorcraft. That's one vehicle where I CANNOT be stranded if I can reasonably avoid it, and the R&R was reasonable in my estimation.

I'd be willing to bet that the "Motorcraft" you replaced the OE pump with was of inferior quality. Much like the AC Delco "Advantage" parts: mostly made in China stuff.

If you got your replacement pump from a dealer, I'd be inclined to believe that it's of some quality. If you sourced from the aftermarket, I'd be wary.
 
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Is the filter in the tank? I had a integral filter plug up once. I likely could have figured out how to clean the filter once I had it out, but at that point I just went ahead and put the new Bosch pump in.

Other than that one which I don't count, I had one fuel pump go on I guess maybe 10 vehicles - which was an early 2000's Ford.
 
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GM trucks have had high failure rates of fuel pumps. Hard to understand why GM truck engineers could not come up with better fuel pumps when other vehicle engineers could.

The '96-'02 where extremely prone to failure, A lot of them where directly caused by the Metri-Pack 150 series Connector/Terminals used at the Pump Module. GM started phasing in GT-280 Series connectors in 2003. The GT-280 Series terminals can handle roughly twice the amperage. Though the wiring is still on the small side on all GMT800 trucks.
 
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I'd be willing to bet that the "Motorcraft" you replaced the OE pump with was of inferior quality. Much like the AC Delco "Advantage" parts: mostly made in China stuff.

If you got your replacement pump from a dealer, I'd be inclined to believe that it's of some quality. If you sourced from the aftermarket, I'd be wary.

As far as I can determine, the only fuel pumps still made in the USA are made by TI Automotive.

Carter makes some, if not all, of their pumps in Mexico.

The rest are all made in China.

Bought a Delphi pump for the 1984 Cavalier...made in China.
 

George7941

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As far as I can determine, the only fuel pumps still made in the USA are made by TI Automotive.

Carter makes some, if not all, of their pumps in Mexico.

The rest are all made in China.

Bought a Delphi pump for the 1984 Cavalier...made in China.
As I mentioned in a previous post, I have had extremely good service out of a TI Automotive manufactured Walbro. I replaced about five Cummins branded, Carter manufactured pump that comes with the ISB 5.9 diesel one after the other till I replaced it with the Walbro around 2009 and that Walbro pump is still going strong.
 
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