Driving a lot for Work

Joined
Jul 13, 2020
Messages
188
I would add to the other recommendations a high quality radio/entertainment system that is straightforward to use.

All the talk about how much money you’ll “bank” could be realized but I would not rely on it. If the AC goes out or suspension needs big work you’ll eat into it quickly. There’s a reason that the reimbursement rate is what it is 😎😎
 
Joined
Dec 24, 2014
Messages
1,156
Location
Huntington WV
Comfort above all else. For almost two years I drove the transit connect 1200 to 1500 a week!.
I went mostly 15k oci during that time with 5w-30 Castrol Edge or Mobil1
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2018
Messages
5,282
Location
Great Lakes
I remember back in 2012 when national average prices topped $4, you couldn't give a large truck or SUV away. Picked up a nice 2001 Durango for $450 but had to hold on to it for 2 years before selling.
Ford F-series sales were up over 200,000 units in 2012 over the 2009 low point of 413,625 and continued to raise until 2019. Silverado sales have been on an absolute tear with sales increasing even through that period. Even Ram managed to sell more vehicles year over year during that period.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
2,186
last night my wife and I drove 2.5 hours each way to meet our daughter for dinner. Our druthers was to take the little Lexus GS, a camry-sized sedan, reasonably quiet, comfortable enough, good highway mpg, and it’s all the car we needed. BUT, for the very reasons stated here we took the work-spec f-150. everyones headlights are above its trunk lid, and the side mirrors get full in-beam doses at night. the truck tends to get more highway use than the car, for this and other similar reasons.

with as many features as we’ve got, it’s a mystery to me why we don’t have dimming side mirrors.
I owned a 2018 Silverado for two years (actually put 52,000 miles on it in that time), and the highway driving was good because of the reasons you mention. I just loved that if someone was driving right up into my colon, that I could barely tell. Or if there was someone in front of me I could easily see up and over them. Which drives me crazy when I can’t.

Other than that, I’ll take my 2016 Avalon over THAT truck simply because of the reliability. And it’s pretty roomy and comfortable. I feel like the legroom, shoulder room, overall feeling of spaciousness in this Avalon is unbelievable. I almost bought a similar year GS350 and I did like it, but I’m a big guy and it did feel a little cramped, especially that driver’s side arm rest...the thing just sort of ends, as your elbow doesn’t know what’s going on. That was going to take some getting used to for me...still, I did make an offer on that car until the carfax came back on it and it was discovered it had been in an accident.
 
Joined
Dec 28, 2014
Messages
2,186
Comfort above all else. For almost two years I drove the transit connect 1200 to 1500 a week!.
I went mostly 15k oci during that time with 5w-30 Castrol Edge or Mobil1
You put 120,000 plus miles on a Ford Transit in two years? How many miles does that thing have now?
 
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
Messages
983
Location
South Wales, UK
I'd love to spend some time in the US and see exactly why you guys think you need such massive powerful cars.

I do 25k to 30k per year in the UK. We have 70mph speed limits (but tend to cruise at 80 to 95mph) and do perfectly well in my Vauxhall Insignia (Buick Regal to those accross the pond) which only has a little 1.5 3 cylinder diesel (122hp) and a manual box. In addition, if you keep your speed down on a cruise it will EASILY average 70mpg (US).
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
12,151
Location
Suburban Washington DC
I do 25k to 30k per year in the UK. We have 70mph speed limits (but tend to cruise at 80 to 95mph) and do perfectly well in my Vauxhall Insignia (Buick Regal to those accross the pond) which only has a little 1.5 3 cylinder diesel (122hp) and a manual box. In addition, if you keep your speed down on a cruise it will EASILY average 70mpg (US).
Sounds like a great car but unfortunately, the top brass at GM don't have enough sense to sell such a car here.
 
Joined
Jun 26, 2003
Messages
12,506
Location
Illinois
There are no "uncomfortable" cars sold in the last 50 years. At 65 cents a mile the OP could really make bank with the right one.
Depends on how you are built.

Our 1999 Mercury Grand Marquis wasn't all that comfortable. I have relatively short legs for my height (29" inseam, 5'11" so short legs and shirts are from the tall collection. The seat was set all the way back for my short legs and I felt like it needed to go back another inch.

Depending on how one is built, not all cars are comfortable.

oilBabe doesn't like my Mazda3 because she claims its hard for her to get in and out of it due to how low to the ground it is compared to her Rav4.

Different strokes.

But the general guidance regarding get something you like/love/find comfortable is good as you will spend more time in the car compared to the time spent by the average bear.
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
13,471
Location
MA
last night my wife and I drove 2.5 hours each way to meet our daughter for dinner. Our druthers was to take the little Lexus GS, a camry-sized sedan, reasonably quiet, comfortable enough, good highway mpg, and it’s all the car we needed. BUT, for the very reasons stated here we took the work-spec f-150. everyones headlights are above its trunk lid, and the side mirrors get full in-beam doses at night. the truck tends to get more highway use than the car, for this and other similar reasons.

with as many features as we’ve got, it’s a mystery to me why we don’t have dimming side mirrors.
Lexus tends to be cheaper with features than Mercedes. Even though my E350 has auto dimming mirrors as standard, I think it only does the driver side mirror, it doesn't do dimming for the passenger side mirror. One reason I preferred Mercedes over Lexus, Mercedes tends to have more features and options than Lexus so of course it's going to be less reliable. I'd rather have the features than not, kinda defeats the purpose of a luxury car but there are lots of other base model cars out there.
 
Joined
Feb 15, 2003
Messages
12,601
Location
Jupiter, Florida
I'd love to spend some time in the US and see exactly why you guys think you need such massive powerful cars.

I do 25k to 30k per year in the UK. We have 70mph speed limits (but tend to cruise at 80 to 95mph) and do perfectly well in my Vauxhall Insignia (Buick Regal to those accross the pond) which only has a little 1.5 3 cylinder diesel (122hp) and a manual box. In addition, if you keep your speed down on a cruise it will EASILY average 70mpg (US).
Hahaha, we don't just "think" we need big powerful vehicles, we KNOW we need them. How else are you going to get this 3000 miles away to a vacation destination:

177311-432x288-RVIA-Toy-Hauler-Image.jpg


On a more serious note, the USA is huge and has some very large, very long, very boring roads. Quite frankly, it's more than a little annoying to take a family trip/business trip and spend day after day in a tiny vehicle.
 
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
Messages
983
Location
South Wales, UK
Hahaha, we don't just "think" we need big powerful vehicles, we KNOW we need them. How else are you going to get this 3000 miles away to a vacation destination:

177311-432x288-RVIA-Toy-Hauler-Image.jpg


On a more serious note, the USA is huge and has some very large, very long, very boring roads. Quite frankly, it's more than a little annoying to take a family trip/business trip and spend day after day in a tiny vehicle.

You wouldn't be allowed to drive that on a standard driving licence in the UK and Europe anyway. On a standard driving licence we can drive a car with a maximum weight of 3,500kgs with a trailer weighing 3,500kgs.

You don't need to have small tinny cars. I wouldn't call a Buick Regal a small tinny car at all. But you don't need 500hp to cruise at 80mph. Like I said, my little 1.5 diesel will sit at that sort of speed all day every day and do 50mpg+.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2009
Messages
702
Location
Southeastern, PA
the 2022 IRS mileage reimbursement rate is 58.5 cents per mile. If you get 65 cents per mile you have to pay tax on the difference between the rates.

24,000 miles at 65 cents, that is $15,600

24,000 miles at 58.5 cents is $14,040 "non-taxable" reimbursement

You would have to report and pay tax on the $1,560 difference
 

GMFan

Thread starter
Joined
Dec 26, 2007
Messages
2,284
Location
NC
Thank you all for the useful information.

An update:

During the second interview I was asked what vehicle I currently drive. The impression I have is that I will need a pickup truck for this job to haul fire damaged equipment (dishwasher, washing machine, etc.) as well as store tools - which means I will likely also need a tool chest for the truck. I will also need to haul fire suits, respirators, and other equipment that would be carcinogenic after exposure to the field, so I will need to be separated from that equipment until I can decontaminate it. I will be onsite for buildings damaged by fire - so I was told I will get VERY dirty. Basically, I would travel to buildings that may have a fire, and I need to haul "evidence" as needed based on site findings back to the company lab.

My territory will be NC/SC. I would not cover TN or GA.

So in short, I will need some sort of pickup truck dedicated solely to work (that I would not use for personal use). I certainly wouldn't need an F350 - I'm thinking whatever has best mpg and is a decent size.

What do I need to keep in mind if I will be filthy? I'm thinking a used truck that is reliable and gets decent mpg. I would go through company training on safety, PPE, respirator and suit use, and how to properly clean after exposure to fire sites.

Based on what I was told, it sounds like I would be just reimbursed per miles at the IRS rate, and not a $700/month 25c/mile.

I think worst case is I buy a used truck, and if I decide I don't like the job just flip it?

Thanks.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 15, 2003
Messages
12,601
Location
Jupiter, Florida
The impression I have is that I will need a pickup truck for this job to haul (stuff)
I think I did not mention that my fav vehicle of all to drive on long trips is my 2009 F150 4x4 Lariat Super Crew. Stupidly comfy heated n cooled leather seats, great solid ride, etc. The other 2 F150's I drive are the 2.7L 2018 4x4 Super Crew (also an epic truck and a close second) and a 2011 F150 3.5L Ecoboost Super Crew 2x4 (which groans like a UPS delivery van) and I dislike it on 3000 mile trips.

The 2.7 Ecoboost engine is amazing, gets 21mpg, and will last forever. There is one floating around with nearly 500K miles on it.

Friend has a new Silverado V8 and gets 17, same as my 3.5L EB. But the V8 Chevy engine is FAR more pleasant. It's also quite comfy with a good ride. But the seats are not quite as good as the big heated/cooled leather Ford seats.

Would I purchase a GM truck next time, yes, if I can get a V8 and great seats. Otherwise it would be a 2.7L Ford Lariat for the best combo of MPG, epic power and comfy seats. Remember, the Ford is Aluminum and lighter. So it's fast.

Check out the new "max recline" seats. I need 'em!!!!

maxresdefault.jpg
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2018
Messages
5,282
Location
Great Lakes
Thank you all for the useful information.

An update:

During the second interview I was asked what vehicle I currently drive. The impression I have is that I will need a pickup truck for this job to haul fire damaged equipment (dishwasher, washing machine, etc.) as well as store tools - which means I will likely also need a tool chest for the truck. I will also need to haul fire suits, respirators, and other equipment that would be carcinogenic after exposure to the field, so I will need to be separated from that equipment until I can decontaminate it. I will be onsite for buildings damaged by fire - so I was told I will get VERY dirty. Basically, I would travel to buildings that may have a fire, and I need to haul "evidence" as needed based on site findings back to the company lab.

My territory will be NC/SC. I would not cover TN or GA.

So in short, I will need some sort of pickup truck dedicated solely to work (that I would not use for personal use). I certainly wouldn't need an F350 - I'm thinking whatever has best mpg and is a decent size.

What do I need to keep in mind if I will be filthy? I'm thinking a used truck that is reliable and gets decent mpg. I would go through company training on safety, PPE, respirator and suit use, and how to properly clean after exposure to fire sites.

Based on what I was told, it sounds like I would be just reimbursed per miles at the IRS rate, and not a $700/month 25c/mile.

I think worst case is I buy a used truck, and if I decide I don't like the job just flip it?

Thanks.
Test drive them all to see which one you find comfortable first and foremost. I find Chevy’s seats to be extremely uncomfortable for instance.

Haven’t looked in awhile, but used truck prices were ridiculous the last time I did… I know you can get a long bed regular cab Ram 1500 Classic with the 8 speed and 3.6 v6 for less than 30k.
 
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
Messages
983
Location
South Wales, UK
Would something as 'small' as the Ford Ranger fit the bill? Did you get the 5 pot diesel in the states? Cracking engine that.

And I say 'small' like that because compared to our traffic the Ford Ranger in the UK looks f'ing massive. :ROFLMAO:
 

GMFan

Thread starter
Joined
Dec 26, 2007
Messages
2,284
Location
NC
I would imagine that I would need a truck with a long bed. I think a Chevy Colorado would work.

That all being said, I am waiting for an offer from this company. I am considering not taking the job due to the large upfront cost of having to purchase my own truck to be used for work. I don’t think the IRS mileage would ultimately cover my vehicle expenses, not to mention the large upfront cost of buying a truck. Used trucks are a fortune and new ones are in the 35K range which to me is a lot to expect me to cover for this job.

That all being said, I may try and negotiate this after I get an offer asking them to cover the vehicle, or give me a large sign on bonus to cover the vehicle…or even better just provide me with a truck to use for work.
 
Joined
Sep 30, 2013
Messages
14,899
Location
Indiana
That many miles they should provide you with a company vehicle.

I would turn the job down.
I agree with the company vehicle. Their vehicle. Their problem.

$.65 a mile. 2000 miles. Take taxes out (approx 30%). That’s like $230 a week for your vehicle and it’s gas.
 
Joined
Apr 27, 2012
Messages
13,471
Location
MA
I would imagine that I would need a truck with a long bed. I think a Chevy Colorado would work.

That all being said, I am waiting for an offer from this company. I am considering not taking the job due to the large upfront cost of having to purchase my own truck to be used for work. I don’t think the IRS mileage would ultimately cover my vehicle expenses, not to mention the large upfront cost of buying a truck. Used trucks are a fortune and new ones are in the 35K range which to me is a lot to expect me to cover for this job.

That all being said, I may try and negotiate this after I get an offer asking them to cover the vehicle, or give me a large sign on bonus to cover the vehicle…or even better just provide me with a truck to use for work.
That job doesn't sound like any bargain on the reimbursement rate. You might lose money on a pickup truck due to repairs and the cost of gas and high upfront cost of the truck. And of course the risk of death is based on per million miles driven so the more you drive, the higher the odds of something happening.
 
Top