Been using Amsoil Series 2000...better grease?

Messages
816
Location
McGregor TX
I have a 2002 Toyota Tacoma PreRunner. I bought it new and have been using Amsoil's Series 2000 grease in all of the fittings since it was brand new. The manual requires NLGI 2 in all, but recommends certain lube points to get a moly-fortified grease. I figured that the Series 2000 grease was good enough to hold up (I lube every 6 months / 7500 miles) and so far it certainly seems to be. I have over 130K miles on a 9 year old truck and have had no issues. However, I'm getting to the end of my current supply of grease and was wondering if there might be a better all-around grease to use. I don't plan on using more than one type. I'm only going to keep one grease gun. So I guess my question is this: do you think should I stick with what I've been doing and continue using Series 2000? Should I switch to a different synthetic grease that is moly-fortified (Valvoline synpower?) and use that everywhere instead? What do you guys think?
 

mrdctaylor

Thread starter
Messages
816
Location
McGregor TX
Also worth asking about: compatibility with the current (Series 2000) grease. I certainly don't want any issues along those lines. So that is something to consider as well.
 
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Messages
833
Location
GA
For your application I would go with Amsoil's GLC grease (http://www.amsoil.com/storefront/glc.aspx) I have an older Toyota 4WD application that I have used this on extensively, no problems. Just really good stuff. I have now discovered Schaeffers greases and use 238 (high EP additive content, very tacky) for the sliding surfaces like balljoints and spindle bushings.
 
Messages
777
Location
Herndon, VA
mrdctaylor - I was in the same situation regarding the proper grease to use - I currently own 2 4WD Tundras. I've been using the Amsoil GHD grease, that has (I think) 2% moly in it. That grease has been discontinued, though. I will be using Amsoil's GLC grease when I run out of the GHD, as JZiggy recommended. One observation - although the discussion you referenced in the TundraSolutions forum makes valid points, keep the following in perspective: 1) From the research I did, I'll bet perhaps 50% of the zerks on Toyota 4WD pickups never get ANY grease, or get grease in intervals far beyond the specified interval. Even many dealers aren't aware that zerks exist on these vehicles! 2) For the 50% of the zerks that DO get maintained, I am willing to bet that perhaps 70-80% of those get the "wrong" grease - either non-moly grease is used in the double-cardan joint, or moly grease is used everywhere. Despite this, there is no epidemic of failed U-joints or drive shafts in Toyota vehicles. There seems to be much less interest in greases than in motor oils or gear lube/ATF. Most people seem to think "grease is grease". I know that's the wrong perspective, and ignorance is no reason to justify no maintenance, or using the wrong materials. But I suspect the application for the zerks on our drive shafts is perhaps less critical than many of the applications that require grease. I would choose a good synthetic grease, suitable for extreme pressure (to satisfy the needs of the double-cardan joint) and call it a day. Amsoil GLC satisfies this fine.
 

mrdctaylor

Thread starter
Messages
816
Location
McGregor TX
Do you guys think the GLC grease is actually a better grease than the Series 2000 grease for our application? Or is it simply a better value (being several dollars cheaper per tube)?
 
Messages
833
Location
GA
GLC is not marketed as a super high-speed grease... also consider that with 33" tires going 70mph your wheel bearings are only seeing 700rpm.
 
Messages
777
Location
Herndon, VA
The Series 2000 is a better grease, but for our application, the advantages would not be realized. One area where GLC does perform significantly better than the Series 2000 is Water Wash-out, which is more significant in our application, since the zerks can be directly exposed to road spray. I would use the GLC.
 

jmo

Messages
19
Location
Liberty Hill, Texas
mrdctaylor: I read the link you supplied. I say that guy is full of [censored] about Moly. I work with several CLS certified people and confirmed with a phd level chemists that what that guy is reporting is only half-truths. First inaccurate info is grease is 80%-90% oil. His statement leads you to believe all grease fits those percentages. Lithium Complex grease is roughly 70% oil. Calcium Sulfonate fits at about 80% and Aluminum Complex exceeds 90%. Secondly, Moly doesn't centrifuge. A grease can if it isn't strong enough. Everything that guy is blaming on Moly is the result of a poor performing grease or poor grease construction. It has nothing to do with Moly in genereal. Last, there are different grades of Moly. Using an Industrial grade Moly at 7 microns can lead to the problems he described. That has more to do with the poor quality of Moly that manufacturer chose to use. Many of the high quality greases use a Technical fine grade of Moly at .7 microns and is not possible to cause the problems stated. It isn't that the guy is wrong, it's he is only telling part of the story. Moral of the story is: chose a quality Moly grease like Schaeffer's, Hydrotek, Certified, TRC or several others who use the technical fine grade of Moly, use it on everything and you will be happy with the extended life of the components.
 
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