ATF options for 2004 Toyota Celica GT?

Messages
11
Location
Canada
First off, hello to everyone as this is my first post since joining BITOG. I'm just wondering what my best options might be for ATF on my 2004 Toyota Celica. The specs in the owners manual call for Toyota Genuine ATF Type T-IV. I'm curious if there's a better alternative to the Toyota stuff and would be thankful for any help/opinion in this regard!
 
Messages
3,610
Location
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
I've been using Mobil 1, Full Synthetic, ATF fluid in my transmission and power steering. I'm quite happy with the results. I did a full flush of the PS and AT before running the Mobil 1. By the way WELCOME to BITOG!
 
Last edited:
Messages
25,986
Location
Upstate NY
I +1 on the Mobil 1 synthetic or Amsoil synthetic. I would do a DIY flush (pretty easy). The car I think has a filter that needs to be changed if it has not been done recently. My 1994 Camry had a handy drain plug. Add a Magnefine inline filter and you will never again need to fool with the filter in the transmission.
 

hansonywu

Thread starter
Messages
11
Location
Canada
Thanks for the feedback guys. I've read good things about Royal Purple Max ATF in regards to smooth shifting - has anyone used this in a Toyota Type T-IV application? I just recently bought the car used and it's sitting at 123,xxx kms at the moment. It's been serviced regularly at the Toyota dealer but as far as I can tell with the records, the only time the fluid was flushed as at 95,xxx. Surprisingly, that is exactly when the scheduled maintenance on Toyota's website calls for ... I would have thought it to be good to do a drain & fill at least every 30,000km or so frown Would it be detrimental to start doing drain-and-fill's this point in time?
 

hansonywu

Thread starter
Messages
11
Location
Canada
I contacted my local Toyota Dealer and Type-IV fluid is $7.32/L. Seems not bad for OEM materials, perhaps I'll just pick a few litres up. What kind of interval is recommended for drain & fill?
 
Messages
1,027
Location
Wisconsin
To find the service records for all service that has been performed on your vehicle at any Toyota dealership, register your car for FREE at www.toyota.com You will need your Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). You will also have access to a online version of the owner's manual and any recalls for your vehicle. A "drain & fill" gets, at most, 1/2 of the total fluid present in the transaxle system. A fluid exchange (often called "flush" but is just an exchange with new fluid) gets close to 90% of the fluid. A fluid exchange can be done at most "quick lube" places. Most will use the fluid that you bring....but make SURE that they actually put YOUR fluid in. The Dealership likely will do the fluid exchange, if you specify that this is what you want done. I use Redlin D4 in my Toyota, which calls for a Dexron III fluid. The D4 is also recommended for the T-IV application. Mobil 1 is also well respected and easier to find. I get my Redline online. Amsoil also has a good reputation. I have not read about Royal Purple in the T-IV application....however, if they list it in the recommended application list on the bottle, then I would trust it. If you are set on a drain & fill, then I would do at least 2 of them......drain & fill, run the engine......and then repeat. Not as complete as a fluid exchange, but you will get enough of a fluid change that it will be close. As mentioned above, adding a Magnefine filter to the cooler line going from the cooler INTO the transmission would be a good addition. They catch a LOT of stuff that the in-pan filter does not, and they have a big magnet that all the fluid flows over, catching a lot of the metal (clutch) dust from the fluid. The end result is that your fluid stays cleaner for longer, which is great for keeping the fluid valving clean. The magnefine filters to a nominal particle size of 30-35 microns, which is 2 to 3 times smaller than the BEST of the in-pan filters. My older Toyota (2003 Sienna) only has a nylon screen inside the in-pan filter, so the Magnefine was a MAJOR step up for me. Changing the fluid, as you are thinking, is a major way to reduce the particles in the fluid. Most of these particles are normal clutch wear material. The problem with not changing the fluid is that these particles can clog the fluid valves and also cause wear to the fluid valve and valve seats. Fortunately, the transmissions in Toyotas have a reputation for being quite reliable.
 
Messages
809
Location
reno nv
It is safer to use Toyota T-IV in your celica GT. You can do drain/refill. I personally do drain/refill on my 2006 camry v6 using Toyota T-IV.
 

hansonywu

Thread starter
Messages
11
Location
Canada
I did a drain and fill today. A little less than 3L came out of the drain plug. I noticed the previous dealership service overfilled the fluid, so only about 2.5L of new Type T-IV went in. moto, how often do you do a drain/refill?
 
Messages
809
Location
reno nv
I jack the driver side, then use 10mm Hex allen Key. ( drain bolt is just under there ). Then I put back 3.7 qt from transmission dip stick hole ).. thats all. it is very easy to do.. drain/refill every 20k oil change/rotate tires. every 5k. dino oil
 

hansonywu

Thread starter
Messages
11
Location
Canada
Originally Posted By: moto94536
I jack the driver side, then use 10mm Hex allen Key. ( drain bolt is just under there ). Then I put back 3.7 qt from transmission dip stick hole ).. thats all. it is very easy to do.. drain/refill every 20k oil change/rotate tires. every 5k. dino oil
I noticed that next the to primary drain bolt - it lies directly underneath the bottom of the transmission, there was another same-sized drain bolt that ran sideways. I've read a few places that this is for the differential? Does that mean when I do a drain & fill I can also drain this? Does it "share" the transmission fluid with the transmission? Sorry if I sound confusing ... Thanks again.
 
Messages
1,027
Location
Wisconsin
This picture is from my 2003 Sienna. I was laying under it, looking forward. The drain plug pointing down is the transmission. The drain plug pointing back toward me is the differential. Both take a 10mm hex. In the NEWER vehicles, the transmission and differential SHARE the SAME fluid. Draining the differential gets more of the old fluid out. What I recommend you do, to be SURE that you don't end up with a drained (not filled) differential........once you drain both. Put the drain plug back into the transmission,.... LEAVE the differential plug OUT....... Then slowly add new ATF through the dipstick......constanly checking for flow of fresh ATF out of the open differential plug location. Once you see fresh ATF flow out of the differential.....you KNOW that they share the same fill point. Then you can put the drain plug back into the differential and fill both through the dipstick. I read that early to mid-90's used separate fluid......and the differential was filled through a fill plug.....that is located above the drain plug. However, I don't know the year(s) that they switched over. So....even though I had read that both were filled through the dipstick and that they share the same fluid......I wanted to be SURE. NOTE: These comments are for the transaxle (transmission/differential) assembly for FRONT WHEEL DRIVE ONLY. Do not confuse this with all wheel drive / 4 wheel drive versions.
 

hansonywu

Thread starter
Messages
11
Location
Canada
Originally Posted By: wiswind
This picture is from my 2003 Sienna. I was laying under it, looking forward. The drain plug pointing down is the transmission. The drain plug pointing back toward me is the differential. Both take a 10mm hex. In the NEWER vehicles, the transmission and differential SHARE the SAME fluid. Draining the differential gets more of the old fluid out. What I recommend you do, to be SURE that you don't end up with a drained (not filled) differential........once you drain both. Put the drain plug back into the transmission,.... LEAVE the differential plug OUT....... Then slowly add new ATF through the dipstick......constanly checking for flow of fresh ATF out of the open differential plug location. Once you see fresh ATF flow out of the differential.....you KNOW that they share the same fill point. Then you can put the drain plug back into the differential and fill both through the dipstick. I read that early to mid-90's used separate fluid......and the differential was filled through a fill plug.....that is located above the drain plug. However, I don't know the year(s) that they switched over. So....even though I had read that both were filled through the dipstick and that they share the same fluid......I wanted to be SURE. NOTE: These comments are for the transaxle (transmission/differential) assembly for FRONT WHEEL DRIVE ONLY. Do not confuse this with all wheel drive / 4 wheel drive versions.
That's a great idea & thanks, although I'm still semi-scared in the aftermath that they actually don't share the same fill point. Is there a way for me to verify that my transmission for my 2004 Celica is comparable to your 2003 Sienna?
 
Top