Ash Content

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403
Location
Central Texas
I can't find anything in spec sheets to characterize greases relative to others or competition regarding their ash content as you would with a motor oil. What kind of number could one expect if there was such an analysis? I understand that most metal-soap thickener based greases would contain significantly more compared to fumed silica, clay, polyurea, and PTFE thickeners, because (fundamentally) those metal soap thickeners make up a significant volume % of the grease, and are thus the biggest contributer to metals in the grease.
 

Brian553

Thread starter
Messages
403
Location
Central Texas
The grease is very likely to burn a small amount in its use, and I just dont understand how much ash it may generate. I'm sorry my question is too weird for y'all.
 
Messages
198
Location
USA
Based strictly on a lab test, I think you'll find that a soap thickened grease contains far less ash-contributing metal than a clay grease contains clay. An example…a #2 aluminum complex grease may contain 8.5-9% soap containing 0.45-0.48% aluminum and the balance long chain fatty acid and benzoic acid. A #2 clay grease will contain 8-10% clay which may be 100% ash contributing.
 
Messages
2,019
Location
California
Originally Posted by Brian553
The grease is very likely to burn a small amount in its use, and I just dont understand how much ash it may generate. I'm sorry my question is too weird for y'all.
if the grease burns you are using the wrong grease or you have mechanical failure happening. They make extreme high temperature grease that can withstand about 1600 degree F. It's used for conveyors in ovens and kilns, hinges, chains, and valves in very high temperature applications.
 
Messages
198
Location
USA
In most cases, grease is just a thickened flammable fluid. They do burn under the right conditions. There are fire resistant greases.
 
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