a/c accumulator

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When i got the 93 olds with 29k , the air did not work. i never really messed with it, i just drove windows down.So the compressor and system really only have 29k miles on it as it has never run for me. I decided to see if i can fix this without spending a ton on it. I found the high and low side schrader valves leaking. I have not found any other leaks with dye. I am going to put a new receiver/dryer on it and see if it holds a vacuum. I see several on rock auto and advance auto has 3. They vary in price from $25 , $34 and a swivel top for $45. My question is , is there a big difference in quality of these. For this car after market are the only choices.
 
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popcorn2 your subject says a/c accumulator, but you say you are going to put a new receiver/drier in?
 
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spasm3

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Originally Posted By: 1 FMF
popcorn2 your subject says a/c accumulator, but you say you are going to put a new receiver/drier in?
I use both terms probably incorrectly, i guess since my system uses an orifice tube that accumulator is the correct term. The basic functions are similar.
 
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i would be careful, because in the end they are not the same and if you buy the wrong one you will have wasted your money. the receiver/drier is used in AC systems that have a thermostatic expansion (Tx) valve. it has dessicant and a filter in it like an accumulator but that's where the similarity ends. its purpose is to hold liquid refrigerant and it's placed between the condenser and the Tx valve in the high pressure liquid line... the Tx valve is placed on the inlet/outlet lines of the evaporator and regulates the flow of refrig. through the evaporator. the rec/drier ensures the Tx valve always gets liquid refrigerant. the accumulator is a larger tank compared to the rec/drier tank, the accum. allows for expansion of any liquid refrigerant after it leaves the evaporator so no liquid makes it to the compressor, the accum. is placed on the low pressure side between the evap. and compressor and is used in orifice tube systems where there is no regulation of refrigerant through the evaporator- any regulation is done by the compressor being variable displacement, or clutch cycling based on system pressures.
 
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In the year 1993, some cars had R-12 and some had R-134a. Do you know what you have right now? If you don't, check the refrigerant information label under your hood and also search for labels that may say the car was retrofitted with R-134a. If you have an R-12 system, you will need to go through the process of retrofitting, because R-12 is expensive, scarce, and many shops lack the equipment to handle it.
 

spasm3

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Originally Posted By: artificialist
In the year 1993, some cars had R-12 and some had R-134a. Do you know what you have right now? If you have an R-12 system, you will need to go through the process of retrofitting, because R-12 is expensive, scarce, and many shops lack the equipment to handle it.
Its an r-12 system. I am replacing the fittings with r-134 fittings for convenience since my guages have r134 adapters( and because the schrader valves leak). Don't want to go into too much detail but i won't be using r 134. You can get r-12 if you look around. I may use an alternate.
 
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