2007 Corolla - P0441 and P0455 codes

Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
42
Location
Alabama
Recently purchased a 2007 Corolla S with 212,000 miles to replace a 2005 Corolla S which was totaled by a drunken driver while parked on the street. Car appeared in good shape, tight and quiet on test drive with good pickup, ran and idled well etc. Shortly after purchase CEL came on. Pulled codes - 1 code at that point - P0171. Replaced the intake manifold gasket with revised orange silicone gasket per TSB EG-045-07. Revised manifold gasket corrected the P0171 code. After replacing intake manifold gasket, CEL came on again, this time with a pair of codes P0441 EVAP emission control system purge flow fault and P0455 EVAP emission control system leak (large). Replaced the purge solenoid mounted in engine bay and cleared codes - CEL came back within 1 week with P0441 and P0455 again. At the time I replaced purge solenoid, I attempted to test rubber hoses from hard line to purge solenoid and from purge solenoid to intake manifold by putting cone adapter on my tire inflator meant for filling air mattresses into one end of the hose, holding my thumb over other end of hose to somewhat block it, and held hose under water to check for any bubbles. I saw no bubbles from either hose, so believe them to be good. Replaced gas cap with new one from Toyota dealership and cleared codes - again CEL came back within 1 week with same two codes P0441 and P0455. Used a scan tool to run the ECM's key-off EVAP test hoping it would provide greater detail to pinpoint problem, but got same generic codes. The EVAP system test run had results showing the absolute and guage pressure readings during the test, but I was not able to interpret the results to pinpoint anything specific as source of problem. Found TSB EG041-07 which said bad batch of ECM computers could erroneously cause these codes. This TSB suggests replacing original ECM 89661-02K20 with revised ECM 89661-02K21. VIN# of car is in range affected by this TSB. Also found a document for Safety recall AOJ which again called for ECMs to be replaced. Car is also in range of cars affected by this recall. It appears to me that under this recall all "K20" and some "K21" computers were to be replaced, while "K22" ECMs were ok. I checked with Toyota dealer who confirmed that recall service for AOJ recall had been performed on this vehicle. I checked the label on the ECM installed in the car - it has an 89661-02K23 ECM installed. Based on it having a later ECM than the K22 which were deemed ok in recall documentation I reasoned that it was not a bad ECM causing the codes. I replaced the charcoal canister with a new one today, but on running the key-off EVAP test, it still triggers the P0441 and P0455 codes - pending if I run test once, perm with CEL on when I ran test a second time. In all the accounts about these codes I have found online, they were fixed either by a new gas cap, purge solenoid, or charcoal canister. Any suggestions about what to do next and how to do it properly? Anyone know how to interpret the absolute and guage vapor pressure readings shown by key-off EVAP test? These show ~750 mmHg absolute and ~ 0 mmHg guage pressure for a period, followed by a drop to ~ 732 mmHg absolute and ~ -19.3 mmHg guage pressure for a period. It reverts back to 750/0 and then drops again to 732/-19 a second time. I'm thinking the -19 is the vacuum value from when the test is establishing it's small leak value with the small metered orifice, but goes back to atmospheric when it closes the vent valve and tries to pull vacuum on the whole tank, but am unsure of my interpretation. I'd appreciate any guidance anyone who has successfully fixed one of these could provide.
 
Joined
Dec 15, 2016
Messages
676
Location
Long Island, N.Y.
Was going to say "Charcoal Canister" upon initial read, but I do see that it was serviced. And the Purge Valve was #25860-ODO50, correct? I recall a bunch of Corolla's were recalled because of faulty ECM's. I know you stated that you reached out to the Dealer for confirmation, but double check by clicking here: Toyota Recall Support . Besides that, I got nothing.
 

Bama

Thread starter
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
42
Location
Alabama
Original purge solenoid/valve was a Denso 90080-A2001. replaced it with an Intermotor CP789 from Advance autoparts.Original valve turned out to be ok, but since I had purchased a new one went ahead and installed it.
 
Joined
Jun 1, 2012
Messages
483
Location
PA
My sympathies. I just went through something similar with code P0456 (small evap leak) on my '05 Corolla LE. It's frustrating since it's so hard to diagnose---and it's a common problem for 9th-gen Corollas, though that's not clear till you dig around online, especially in forums. On my car it turned out to be the fuel filler neck. Before we figured that out I wasted $$$ throwing a charcoal canister, PCV valve and new gas cap at it, all based on advice from a mechanic I trust who seemed baffled and also seemed like he never wanted to deal with an evap CEL code again. A smoke test never showed any leaks. There was a slight fuel smell but it was no worse at the gas cap/filler area. If you feel confident installing a fuel filler neck yourself, I say it's worth a shot. That was one step past my technical skill level, so I had a local shop do it. Parts plus labor was north of $300. I am not happy about this whole experience....but hopefully it's fixed now. Toyota really should have a step-by-step guide out there for a problem this widespread. (Research it.) Good luck and please let us know how you fix the issue.
 

Bama

Thread starter
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
42
Location
Alabama
No, I do not posess a smoke machine. An old boss and friend once had a shop - he may have one, but not sure. I've seen a couple on amazon in the $95-$150 range. Local Toyota dealer quoted me $120 to do a smoke test. Indie Mechanic i've used some said $100/hr, probably be about $200. Trying to make up my mind whether to spring for a machine from Amazonand try it myself, or just get a "pro" to do it since I've never user a smoke machine and don't have a lift where I can get underneath to see if/where smoke is coming out. That's the thing about being a wannabe mech, always hard to decide whether to keep going yourself vs when it's better to raise the white flag.
 

Bama

Thread starter
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
42
Location
Alabama
Hey Trav: How do I go about checking the filler neck? is there a way to test it? I removed the shroud/liner from the wheel well and eyeballed it in place. I didn't see any gaping holes or massive amounts of rust. I felt what I could reach, but did not cover every square centimeter - there were places I couldn't reach. No large obviously visible cracks. I haven't had a chance to pursue this due to work, but have a week off and was gonna try some more. I found an article online that suggested disconnecting the vent line from gas tank to canister, plugging the port at the canister, and running the evap test again. If it passes evap test this way, leak must be in tank, vent hose, filler neck side of things. If it fails, leak is in canister, purge line/solenoid, intake manifold side of system. Once I narrow it to one side or the other, i'm still unsure how to find the actual leak without either purchasing a smoke tester, or paying a mech to smoke test it. Appreciate any input or suggestions.
 

Bama

Thread starter
Joined
May 25, 2005
Messages
42
Location
Alabama
I found the following article while researching the EVAP codes (P0441 & p0455) issue with my daughter's 2007 Corolla: "Tech Tip: Toyota Key Off Evap Diagnosis" https://www.underhoodservice.com/tech-tip-toyota-key-off-evap-diagnosis/ So after performing steps outlined in the article in "Procedure A" it turns out my air leak is on the tank side of the evap system (fuel tank, gas cap, filler neck). With the fuel tank vent hose disconnected from the charcoal canister, and the vent hose port on the canister sealed off, the car's evap self test runs successfully without any codes. With the fuel tank vent hose connected to the canister, the test triggers evap codes P0441 & P0455. The next step is to "pressurize the EVAP system through the fresh air vent line using the EVAP tester & SST Adapter. Check for leaks on the tank or canister side as needed." Have any of you guys done this? Not sure if "EVAP Tester" is a smoke machine, or just an air pump. Doesn't say how much pressure to use to "pressurize the EVAP system". I can see trying to use my tire inflator set to very low psi value, or maybe a bicycle pump: pump it up, squirt it all down with soapy water, and look for bubbles. Anybody got any experience doing this? Any tips, suggestions, or cautionary warnings? Don't want to end up with my own personal mini version of TWA 800. Any wisdom, advice, suggestions would be welcome. r
 
Joined
Feb 19, 2007
Messages
1,468
Location
Perris, CA
You would want to use a smoke machine. You can make one with a mason jar, soldering iron, and an aquarium pump.
 
Joined
Aug 13, 2004
Messages
1,789
Location
VA
Bama, did you ever get this figured out?

The thread caught my eye because I have the same codes on a 2018 Corolla, accompanied by a fuel smell. Diagnosis was easy in my case--something chewed a hole in a vent line coming off the fuel tank, and fuel drips out when the tank is full. I found the diagram online but the line isn't given a part number. Toyota dealer says the whole tank needs to be replaced, because the line isn't available separately. I'm currently waiting for insurance to approve the repair under comprehensive coverage.
 
Top