Youth .22LR ?

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1,357
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Warner Robins, GA
That's a very nice rifle. I like a bolt action .22 for a young person myself. Savage makes a nice variety of .22's that are nice and come in youth and standard length. Price point is also very reasonable. Also its tough to beat the accutrigger.

 

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I have a CZ .22 and it's a tackdriver .
I bought a 452 varmint about 10 years ago and had to mount the scope on high rings to clear the bolt lift. It's good to see that CZ USA addressed the problem with a new 60 degree bolt lift instead of the old 90 degree.
 

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That's a very nice rifle. I like a bolt action .22 for a young person myself. Savage makes a nice variety of .22's that are nice and come in youth and standard length. Price point is also very reasonable. Also its tough to beat the accutrigger.

The kid writes with his left, but shoots right handed. Before I buy him a .22 I want to make sure I have his preference correct.
 
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My parents bought me a Mossberg 144LSB when I was twelve. A nice full size heavy barreled .22 bolt gun with a five round magazine and accurate. You can usually score a nice one used for under $500. I also have a Winchester 9422 lever action I got almost thirty years ago that I really like. Unlike the Mossberg these Winchester lever action .22's are climbing fast in price on the used market.

The problem with a smaller gun (Length) is the child out grows it.

The place to go for info on .22's is RimfireCentral.com those guys know everything about .22's. They are a great bunch and will happily answer any questions you have on .22's
 

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My parents bought me a Mossberg 144LSB when I was twelve. A nice full size heavy barreled .22 bolt gun with a five round magazine and accurate. You can usually score a nice one used for under $500. I also have a Winchester 9422 lever action I got almost thirty years ago that I really like. Unlike the Mossberg these Winchester lever action .22's are climbing fast in price on the used market.

The problem with a smaller gun (Length) is the child out grows it.

The place to go for info on .22's is RimfireCentral.com those guys know everything about .22's. They are a great bunch and will happily answer any questions you have on .22's

Rimfire central might know everything there is to know about .22s, but on BITOG, everyone is an expert on everything. Does Amsoil make a .22?
 
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1,357
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Warner Robins, GA
The kid writes with his left, but shoots right handed. Before I buy him a .22 I want to make sure I have his preference correct.

My mother is right handed for everything but shoots a rifle left handed.. You never know. Regardless Savage makes both. I'm not knocking the CZ at all by the way I think they are definetly a notch up in fit/finish/wood quality from the Savage, but are also a notch or two up in price. Its sort of hard to find a traditional wood/blue .22 these days. At least compared to 10-15 years ago. My first .22 was a Marlin model 60 with the wood stock sawed off to be shorter for me..
 

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My mother is right handed for everything but shoots a rifle left handed.. You never know. Regardless Savage makes both. I'm not knocking the CZ at all by the way I think they are definitely a notch up in fit/finish/wood quality from the Savage, but are also a notch or two up in price. Its sort of hard to find a traditional wood/blue .22 these days. At least compared to 10-15 years ago. My first .22 was a Marlin model 60 with the wood stock sawed off to be shorter for me..
I have 2 Savage both varmint, one 17HMR and one .22 with the laminated stock. The youth models are very cost effective, and for all practical purposes, a good alternative.
 
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Hedgesville, WV
It all depends on his/her size and strength. Buying a gun that is too long or too heavy will become a flawless heirloom and discourage the shooter because of the difficulty of hitting anything. I always believed that kids should be trained on single shots with iron sights unless their eye sight is an issue. Only this shot counts so make it good.
 

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It all depends on his/her size and strength. Buying a gun that is too long or too heavy will become a flawless heirloom and discourage the shooter because of the difficulty of hitting anything. I always believed that kids should be trained on single shots with iron sights unless their eye sight is an issue. Only this shot counts so make it good.
The CZ comes with a single shot adapter. The LOP is 12 inches, which is too long in most cases. I wouldn't cut off a walnut stock, but no problem with an el'cheapo beach nut pos.
 
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The kid writes with his left, but shoots right handed. Before I buy him a .22 I want to make sure I have his preference correct.
I'm just the opposite, I write with my right hand and shoot left handed. A pistol or rifle neither one feel right in my right hand. When I started shooting a rifle as a youth in the late '60's or early '70's I shot my dad's full length bolt action single shot Remington .22. It seems no one makes a full size single shot anymore or at least I can't find one other than a smooth bore. The last one I saw sold at an auction wasn't a very clean example and if I recall correctly it brought between $200-$250.
 
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369
Location
Hedgesville, WV
The CZ comes with a single shot adapter. The LOP is 12 inches, which is too long in most cases. I wouldn't cut off a walnut stock, but no problem with an el'cheapo beach nut pos.
Getting a shorter stock would definitely help but I noticed with my kids that if the barrel was adult length and even close to normal taper they would have a hard time holding it up. They were only 8 when I started them and I ended up getting a Cricket. Now my grandkids are using it and I hope to pass it down for my great grandkids.
Edit: Mine is a chipmunk but they are now crickets.
 
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Getting a shorter stock would definitely help but I noticed with my kids that if the barrel was adult length and even close to normal taper they would have a hard time holding it up. They were only 8 when I started them and I ended up getting a Cricket. Now my grandkids are using it and I hope to pass it down for my great grandkids.
Edit: Mine is a chipmunk but they are now crickets.
The first gun I bought was a Cooey model 39 for $10 in 1965. I still have it and could sell it for around $250 given its condition.
I could pass it down, but I view it as a family heirloom along with my grandfather's Winchester model 69. They can have those rifles when they pry them from my cold dead hands.
I gave away a lot of junk shotguns in the last 10 years... single shot 12 and 16 guage, bolt action 12 guage Mossburg etc. Bloody eyesores all.
 
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