Wire crimp tool

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For the typical 3M butt splices. I saw a Klein tool in Home Depot the other day, about $30. I have a crimp tool marked "GB", bought years ago, that seems to do a passable job for the few times I use it; but I'm tempted to get a second one to leave in my truck's tool box. The Klein tool, is it half-way decent?
 
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Have you looked online? I got an RJ45 crimper WAAAY cheaper than I could from a store. Klein is generally good, but HD/Lowes seem to overcharge on "home theater" wiring stuff-- which wiring tools may feel in pricing as well.
 
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Originally Posted By: supton
For the typical 3M butt splices. I saw a Klein tool in Home Depot the other day, about $30. I have a crimp tool marked "GB", bought years ago, that seems to do a passable job for the few times I use it; but I'm tempted to get a second one to leave in my truck's tool box. The Klein tool, is it half-way decent?
Good stuff, lifetime warranty as well. I use mine every day.
 
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This is the one I have 909 The Crimper and I've found it to work very well on the 3M style butt splices/ends, insulated or non. Fairly inexpensive at Home Depot (it's found with the other channel lock tools, not in the electrical aisle). Which Klein tool did you see? They seem to make several.
 
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If you search the dozen's of pliar type crimper threads at Garage Journal, you will learn that the Klein model ranks up in the top four best, which also includes Thomas & Betts, Ideal, and Channel Locks. Between the four it boils down to personal preference. Here's my advice: inspect them carefully. When I shopped for crimpers several years ago, I found a batch of bad Kleins at Home Depot. The male part of the non-insulated die was either mis-formed and/or did not line up perfectly with the female side. Many people would not catch this level of detail. Since then, I occasionally check these crimpers at HD and still find some batch differences. I imagine they all work, but I expect U.S. made at higher $$ to have equal or better quality compared to Asian tools. Again, INSPECT THEM CAREFULLY. Some claim that big box stores get "seconds" of name brand products. I don't believe this, but I sometimes wonder. I had to open many American Standard toilet bowls at HD to find one that was cast to sit level (I don't like shimming toilets).
 
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To answer the OP's question, yes Klein tools are good tools, that pair of crimper would probably be $50 in techni-tool. make sure they were made in the USA, probably Texas.
 
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Here's a good example of die mis-alignment in the Harbor Freight model....sorry for the large pic.
 
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Klien 1006 is what I have. I also have the Channelock one. The Klien is better because it has two of the same dies. Doesn't just smash the connector but puts a nice indent into it.
 
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While I understand the Kline is Much, much better, I've made do with the little stamped out ones that HF sell for $4.00. Actually I have one made by Vaco. Then too I have one made by?????????????????????????, found it laying on the road year/decades ago. Both work just fine. I crimped a wire once this year, I think.
 
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The best out there are Ancor double crimp connectors and an Ancor double crimper. All top quality for boating. Ancor also sells single crimp, and adhesive lined, etc. I just re-did the lights on my boat trailer with all LED and used only Ancor connectors and coated the ends with liquid tape.
 
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Aren't some crimping tools made for non insulated connectors? Years ago my Dad bought a Sta-Con (I think) crimper to use with Sta-Con non insulated connectors. (Years ago meaning 45 or so)
 
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Originally Posted By: Donald
Aren't some crimping tools made for non insulated connectors? Years ago my Dad bought a Sta-Con (I think) crimper to use with Sta-Con non insulated connectors. (Years ago meaning 45 or so)
In this picture the smaller of the two crimp areas is for non insulated terminals. Always have the "bump" part of the die towards the side of the connector to crimp that is not split.
 
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Originally Posted By: SHOZ
In this picture the smaller of the two crimp areas is for non insulated terminals. Always have the "bump" part of the die towards the side of the connector to crimp that is not split.
I have come across this instruction before but I don't understand the reasoning behind it. If the indent is applied on the side opposite the seam, would that not make the connector barrel open up a bit at the seam once the pressure from the crimper is removed?
 
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Originally Posted By: George7941
Originally Posted By: SHOZ
In this picture the smaller of the two crimp areas is for non insulated terminals. Always have the "bump" part of the die towards the side of the connector to crimp that is not split.
I have come across this instruction before but I don't understand the reasoning behind it. If the indent is applied on the side opposite the seam, would that not make the connector barrel open up a bit at the seam once the pressure from the crimper is removed?
If you crimp with the seam of the connector at the small part of the crimper die it will spreads the seam. If you have the seam at the larger rounded part of the die then the smaller part of the die will better trap the wire strands and the rounded part of the die keeps the seam together.
 
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Originally Posted By: SHOZ
In this picture the smaller of the two crimp areas is for non insulated terminals. Always have the "bump" part of the die towards the side of the connector to crimp that is not split.
Your picture shows the Klein 1006 where both crimp areas are for non insulated terminals. The Klein 1005 is the one with both insulated and non insulated dies. Cheers2 1006 http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/crimpingcutting-tools/crimpingcutting-tool-non-insulated-terminals 1005 http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/crimpi...ated-connectors
 
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I have not tried the Klein tools crimper. My favorite right now for insulated terminals is a made in USA Stanley that I bought at Menards. It out performs a ratchting type that I bought a few years ago at Summit Racing (made in China) and anything else that I have tried in the last 35 years. When they were on sale, I went back and bought a couple more. For me, the pull test is the measure of performance, that and not splitting the insulation. My 0.02.
 
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