Why shake oil bottle before use?

J

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434
Location
Berkeley
Hi, If anything in engine oil will come out of suspension (like the troublesome PTFE) while sitting in storage, shouldn't you leave whatever comes out of suspension in the oil bottle and not force it back into suspension only to have it come out of suspension again inside your engine? So, are there any good reasons for shaking the bottle before pouring oil into engine? [Confused] [Cheers!] Jae
 
Messages
700
Location
USA
I would tend to agree. You don't want what is in the bottom of the bottle to get into your engine. The only time i have seen this is with Castrol GTX.
 

J

Thread starter
Messages
434
Location
Berkeley
quote:
Originally posted by unDummy: Why shake OJ? Why shake touch up paint? Why shake anything? Why NOT [I dont know]
Hi, A human being is essentially topologically equivalent to a worm. Our digestive tract runs down the middle. Only digested stuff go through the inner lining of your small intestines. Touch up paint dries and stays there. Oil to a car is like blood to a human being. I don't want my quack doctor shaking up precipitates in pint of blood before tranfusing me with it. What comes out of suspension in container of blood will come out of suspension in my blood stream and will give me a stroke or at the very least a small, teeny-weeny, minor, no-big-deal heart attack. [No no] [Cheers!] Jae
 
Messages
903
Location
CA
I emailed Redline about seeing sediment in some of thier products. He said: " that is just part of the additive package that can settle out, it isn't harmful in any way. It should recombine when shaken."
 
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69
Location
Tx
quote:
Originally posted by J: A human being is essentially topologically equivalent to a worm. Our digestive tract runs down the middle. Only digested stuff go through the inner lining of your small intestines. Jae
J, you don't happen to work with C.elegans by chance? [Smile]
 

J

Thread starter
Messages
434
Location
Berkeley
quote:
Originally posted by Green Max: J, you don't happen to work with C.elegans by chance? [Smile]
Hi, I don't know who that is. [I dont know] [Cheers!] [Cool] Jae
 
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42
Location
CA, USA
C. elegans is a nematode worm and is used as a laboratory model, initially for work having to do with development. It's a great system actually. As for the precipitates, I'd hesitate to pour stuff into the motor or even steering pump reservoir. Sure, as Redline said, it'll go back into solution when shaken, but doesn't it imply that it can fall out of solution while in the crankcase? I suppose the pumping will mix it in again, and it ought to be OK, but still...
 

J

Thread starter
Messages
434
Location
Berkeley
quote:
Originally posted by Rallyfan: C. elegans is a nematode worm and is used as a laboratory model, initially for work having to do with development. It's a great system actually. As for the precipitates, I'd hesitate to pour stuff into the motor or even steering pump reservoir. Sure, as Redline said, it'll go back into solution when shaken, but doesn't it imply that it can fall out of solution while in the crankcase? I suppose the pumping will mix it in again, and it ought to be OK, but still...
Hi, It's not the pumping that concerns me. Most of the time, your car is just sitting idle. What happens when your car is sitting out in the cold? I'm never shaking my oil bottles. [Cheers!] Jae
 
Messages
34,044
Location
Southern NJ
quote:
I emailed Redline about seeing sediment in some of thier products. He said: " that is just part of the additive package that can settle out, it isn't harmful in any way. It should recombine when shaken."
It's probably all of that Moly. [Razz]
 
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40,410
Location
Great Lakes
My take on this is: Everything that was put in that bottle, was put in there for a reason and is part of the oil I purchased. I'd be sure that all of it makes it to the engine. If whatever settles at the bottom was not meant to be there, don't you think the oil manufacturer would have already taken it out by letting it settle in their distribution tanks first? For all you know, what settles at the bottom of an oil bottle is part of the additive package that most of use are so much after and that we use to differentiate one oil from another, and based on which we make our purchasing decisions. Why would you then go ahead and throw it all in the trash instead of in your engine? [Cheers!]
 

J

Thread starter
Messages
434
Location
Berkeley
quote:
Originally posted by Quattro Pete: My take on this is: Everything that was put in that bottle, was put in there for a reason and is part of the oil I purchased. I'd be sure that all of it makes it to the engine. If whatever settles at the bottom was not meant to be there, don't you think the oil manufacturer would have already taken it out by letting it settle in their distribution tanks first? For all you know, what settles at the bottom of an oil bottle is part of the additive package that most of use are so much after and that we use to differentiate one oil from another, and based on which we make our purchasing decisions. Why would you then go ahead and throw it all in the trash instead of in your engine? [Cheers!]
Hi, What if the precipitation is due to poor quality control by the manufacturer? There are some variations among batches of oil. Some batches may have too much additives to stay in suspension. [Cheers!] Jae
 
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8,711
Location
Nothern USA
If an additive is depleted over the life of the oil, the amount needed may be greater than the amount that is soluble. As it is depleted, more will go into solution when hot oil is circulating around the oil pan. Each chuck hole you hit stirs stuff up. There may good things that are not soluble in the oil and may work without being in solution. As long as thee particle size is small enough and non abrasive, particulates shouldn't be a problem. I will shake my Pennzoil 5W-30.
 

Leo

Messages
911
Location
Australia
Actually I noticed lil bit of sediment on the bottom of the bottle of my Redline SI-1 Cleaner. I initially shook it up, but then I decided to let it stand for a few days cos I realised I dont want it to settle out on the bottom of my petrol tank. I dont drive regulary either..
 
Messages
2,444
Location
Indiana
quote:
Originally posted by J: Hi, If anything in engine oil will come out of suspension (like the troublesome PTFE) while sitting in storage, shouldn't you leave whatever comes out of suspension in the oil bottle and not force it back into suspension only to have it come out of suspension again inside your engine? So, are there any good reasons for shaking the bottle before pouring oil into engine? [Confused] [Cheers!] Jae
When I spoke to a Valvoline tech to ask about the shelf life of Synpower, the guy told me that the shelf life is long but you must shake the bottle if it's been sitting for a long time. That was good enough for me to shake the bottle. As for quality control issues, years ago they found dead mice and cans of Coke. I still drink Coke. I think that pretty much sums up my take on that.
 
Messages
688
Location
Morgantown, WV
Leave it sitting long enough and any oil will start to have its additives come out of suspension. It's easy enough to test: fill a mason jar with oil, stick it in a closet, and check on it in 6 months. How long is your car going to sit unused? A week? Leave your oil sitting out for however long you plan on not using your car and decide if you can live with the results. Cheers, 3MP
 
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