Which engine lives the harshest life?

sloinker

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Originally Posted by javacontour
Well, you did say "on the job" and both Top Fuel and Rocket engines are used in what are legitimately called jobs. I think there is an image of Buzz Aldrin's expenses reimbursement request for this trip the moon. https://twitter.com/TheRealBuzz/status/626812956148248577/photo/1
Originally Posted by sloinker
I'm thinking more daily or continuous use. Hot,dusty,worked hard. cold weather applies on ly until the rigs are working and oil warms up imo. Rocket e gines and top fuel engines fall outside the parameters of everyday use.
You are correct except in the original post I said "Everyday". Not many rocket or top fuel engines in use on a daily basis.
 
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Back when I was in the Coast Guard running the 44 foot motor lifeboats, those engines went from sitting to full throttle when needed. They were plugged in at the dock but once that cold Pacific water started going through the exchangers it took any heat away. I believe they had Detroit Diesels installed. Don't know the size or model # The engineers were constantly working on them. In particular the Jabsco pumps would fail pretty regularly.
 

CT8

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When any engine is operating at its proper operating temps [coolant and oil] its wear will be the lowest.
 
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Originally Posted by philipp10
A lawnmower engine mowing a yard full of stumps. One stump and the blade stops.....broken crankshaft.
My 1981 Briggs and Stratton died that fate after 37 years. It hit many foreign objects until that final 2" bolt hidden in long weeds in concrete took it out. That's the only engine failure I've had.
 
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The Soviet/Russian NK-33 design variants have to be up there, closed cycle daisy chained rocket engine. What could possibly go wrong?
 

sloinker

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I was just thinking about worn out farm and construction equipment. Many years of harsh use with probably minimal maintenance. Kind of proves the point that oil is over engineered in most cases.
 
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My Troybuilt pressure washer with the Honda GCV160 gets a work out. The engine is under a pretty good load 97% of the time. I only run it about 5 hours a year though. So it should last me a lifetime.
 
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Originally Posted by zfasts03
My Troybuilt pressure washer with the Honda GCV160 gets a work out. The engine is under a pretty good load 97% of the time. I only run it about 5 hours a year though. So it should last me a lifetime.
Based on my classifieds readings, the engines outlive the pumps.
 

4WD

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Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Gensets for sure, dead stop cold to WOT and full load.
True … but we have UPS fed pre lube on the big uns … at least they get some oil !
 
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Originally Posted by sloinker
Originally Posted by Oildudeny
Marine engine.. With the sea salt water
I don't know, unlimited cooling water, usually fixed loads while cruising through a standard medium, water. True the salt water is tough on the metals but it takes many years to cause actual harm if maintenance is maintained.
But Harbor Tug Boats must live a miserable life. All "short trips" and variable RPM.
 

4WD

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many marine propulsion systems have gone VFD AC motor … don't run gens you don't need … but what you run is slow speed and at ops temps …
 
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A TGDI motor that is driven in short trips and never warmed up to full operating temp
Originally Posted by philipp10
A lawnmower engine mowing a yard full of stumps. One stump and the blade stops.....broken crankshaft.
It just stops because the blades are stuck.Once you go underneath it and clear it, the mower will start right back up again smile Briggs and Stratton 500, NGK spark plug, Dollar Tree oil But I don't think lawn mowers have the harshest life since they are at operating temperature and at relatively high rpm
 
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Once working for a large hire company (by NZ standards), we would remove an engine, toss it in the skip bin and bolt in another, a real throw away environment.
 
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