Where does oil come from?

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2,688
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Elderly County, Florida
Alright - this is a really basic question - but it kept me awake last night. Oil is an organic material. It comes from decayed plant matter in past years. How then did it get so far under ground? Of what I read, these oil wells are thousands of feet deep. Some are high in the artic where plant life no longer exists. How did all this oil get so far under ground and in such odd places?
 
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855
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Arizona
Take some geology classes. The explanation is very complex and not even agreed upon by some some experts as there are some competing theories out there.
 
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7,550
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North Alabama
G O D put it there because he knew our engines would need lubrication. [Wink] Then those EVIL scientist created synthetics. [No no] Then those REALLY EVIL German engineers created my VW GTI to get even with us for winning the war. [Freak] Then,...........well, I better not say.
 
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855
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Arizona
Wavin wayne. You need to have a few beers first before you can truly appreciate the beauty behind German engineering. So give it a try and then let us know if that changes your point of view.
 
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348
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Colorado
SYNTHETICS ONLY. Historically, refiners made basestock by solvent refining and dewaxing selected crude oil fractions (Group I). With the development of hydrotreating and hydrocracking technology, refiners introduced highly refined, low aromatics, low wax basestocks with improved oxidation stability in large volume (Group II). More recently, higher viscosity index basestocks made by high severity hydrocracking of petroleum fractions have become available (Group III). Group III stocks differ from Group II products in the structure of the lube oil molecules that impart the higher viscosity index. Group III basestocks are limited to lower viscosities, typically, 4 to 7 cSt at 100°C. API identified polyalphaolefins (PAOs) as a special class of basestock. PAOs are made by a chemical process and have the characteristics of uniform composition, very high oxidation stability, high viscosity index and no waxy molecules. By adjusting the manufacturing process, PAOs can be made in a wide range of viscosities, commonly from 4 cSt to 100 cSt at 100°C. For many years, PAOs and esters (Group V) were the only available premium basestocks for engine lubricants operating under extreme temperature and conditions. Most synthetic engine oils made with PAO now contain a small amount of ester to give the basestock the same solvency power as typical mineral oils. This helps to assure that the synthetic lubricant will have the same seal swell characteristics as conventional oils. Critical base oil properties improve from Group I to Group IV. Also, less viscosity index improver (polymer) is required in multigrade engine oils with the higher VI basestocks. This leads to improved shear stability (Stay-In-Grade) and fewer deposits from polymer degradation. Basestocks that have been severely hydrogenated to remove almost all aromatics (Group II and III) and chemically manufactured, 100 percent paraffinic PAOs (Group IV) have an added advantage in boosting the performance of dispersants in the additive package of fully formulated oils to hold soot in finely divided suspension in the oil.  -
 

Bill in Utah

Staff member
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12,849
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UT
quote:
Topic: Where does oil come from?
From Wal-Mart and Checkers of course! [Big Grin] They have the best prices... [Cheers!] [Happy] Take care, bill [Coffee] PS: [Off Topic!] [Razz]
 
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4,478
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Southern California
Interesting concept - a "paraffinic PAO"? (Has anyone told ExxonMobil about this recent molecular discovery?) Another amazing fact presented to the panting public on BITOG... [Roll Eyes] By the way, Thingfish, would you care to ellucidate on the apparent discrepency between your bewildering statement that "Group III basestocks are limited to lower viscosities" and the nice little chart you included that lists the same 4.1 viscosities for Group I, and Group II base oils? [Wink] Group IV are listed on the same chart at a slightly lower 3.9 viscosity. Facts, darn 'em anyway - all they ever do is get in the way of nice, tidy, half-baked opinions! [ February 05, 2006, 10:49 AM: Message edited by: Ray H ]
 
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4,478
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Southern California
Do ANY German cars currently represent the beauty of German engineering? A recent contributor to the technical column of <i>Bimmer</i> magazine concluded his diatribe with "How can a piece of s--t call itself the ultimate driving machine when it spends 80% of its time in the shop?"
 
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4,478
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Southern California
To be fair, the writer was referring to BMW's most recent years of production that have been plagued with QC problems and reviewed unfavorably in <i>Consumer Reports</i> regarding general reliability. BMW is having some troubles, but, historically the company rises to short term challenges, and has fielded many bullet-proof motors. Hopefully, QC will improve dramatically soon. (When ya' push the envelope consistently, sometimes ya' tear through.)
 
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