When filling out an application...

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437
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Illinois, USA
...The question, "Why are you applying for this position?" is sometimes asked. What is a good answer to put down that isn't smart aleck. For example, "To make money."
 
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Great Lakes
This is where you explain how this position is your dream job and how you are uniquely qualified to perform it better than anyone else in the world, figuratively speaking.
 
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Boston, MA
"I'm seeking a position with a challenge which I will enjoy meeting and which will reward me for doing a good job". Rewrite to taste.
 

Bud

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Texas
Agree with Quattro Pete. You are to be a salesman here, and sell yourself to the company.
 
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The Midwest
That is a stupid question to put on an application. Tell the truth and you might not land the job. Corporate America kinda expects you to lie.
 
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Milwaukee, WI
You're reading it as "why are you applying for a job" but you might consider answering the question "why are you applying for THIS position and not any of the other openings we have, or at a different company" and use this opportunity to sell yourself once more.
 
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2,490
Location
Pennsylvania
As someone who used to be involved in the process of hiring technical people, I looked for several things in answers to this question: 1. I feel underutilized in my current job and am looking for a position where I can more effectively use my education/training for the benefit of a company. Your job descritption is exactly what I am seeking. 2. I want to help a company grow and make money. I see your position as one that will allow me to do that more effectively than the position I now hold. 3. I want a position that affords me greater responsibility, more room for growth and allows me to be judged on what I accomplish for the company in the way of increased sales and new products. Now you can rewrite these to suit yourself but in today's world, the BOTTOM LINE is all important. How are you going to help me increase it? Why you and not somebody else? What do you bring to the party that I cannot get from hiring from within? What makes you different, special and extremely useful to me in terms of making money? Avoid, if you are applying to corporations, phrases like: "I want to study..., I want to do research.... These are all PASSIVE things that look to corporate people as money drains that will take their company/department in a direction OPPOSITE to where they are trying to go. If you can, add things like: I am willing to travel and overnight stays are not an issue, I am willing to stay at the job or come in if there is a situation that requires my presence, etc Remember, we live in a capitalist society. Businesses exist to make money for the owners/shareholders. All other elements are SECONDARY.
 
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1,462
Location
East Mountains, NM
Originally Posted By: aquariuscsm
The question that I hate the most and find really silly is "Tell me about yourself".
Or, "Where do you see yourself in 5 years?" That was always my favorite. I actually told the interviewer once "Sitting on your side of the table." They made me an offer. I turned it down.
 
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1,521
Location
Dacono, CO
Originally Posted By: 4wheeldog
Originally Posted By: aquariuscsm
The question that I hate the most and find really silly is "Tell me about yourself".
Or, "Where do you see yourself in 5 years?" That was always my favorite. I actually told the interviewer once "Sitting on your side of the table." They made me an offer. I turned it down.
I'm in the process of hiring to fill a position on my team, and I have to tell you, the way a prospect responds to these two questions is really important for my company. We are looking for someone who has goals in their mind, and can see our company as a way to fulfill them. If you don't have some form of answer for these two questions, you are not fully prepared to work for us at this point in your life. We want people who have lives of their own, and have figured out ways to accomplish things in life. We're not just looking for people to fill seats, and punch a clock everyday. BC.
 
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Saskatoon canada
I hire/fire 100 men a year. I've got guys who drop off resumes daily. I don't even look at them. In my line of work you need a strong back,tough mentality and heart. None of those traits can be inferred from a resume. I hire guys on sight. I give them a week to prove their worth and their wage. After that week we sit down and I tell them their worth to me and they either stay or I cut them a cheque and wish them good luck. I don't care where a man sees himself in 5 years. I care where he sees himself tomorrow,and the next day. I give special considerations to men with families and I'll hold onto them even if they are slightly weaker than other single crew members. These days a man,who takes care of his own is an admirable trait. They are always at work,on time,everyday. I can make money with guys like that. Single men in this business tend to have vices that cut into work. They have less to lose is fired and that reflects in their attendance. A family man tends to see the big picture. Heart can't be seen or felt on paper but when it's -35 and your men are heading onto the site,running to the lumber pile,and hustle hauling to get warm then you see their heart.
 
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4,836
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Central Texas
As others have stated, this is where you tie your knowledge, skills and abilities to their needs. So you need to know your own hand of cards and see how best to play it. You need to separate yourself from your competition to stand out. Doing some research and being prepared is but one way. Showing you've put some thought into it is another. Seeing it from their point-of-view is yet another. Prior Preparation Prevents Poor Performance...the 5 P's.
 
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6,367
Location
Midwest
Originally Posted By: Bladecutter
Originally Posted By: 4wheeldog
Originally Posted By: aquariuscsm
The question that I hate the most and find really silly is "Tell me about yourself".
Or, "Where do you see yourself in 5 years?" That was always my favorite. I actually told the interviewer once "Sitting on your side of the table." They made me an offer. I turned it down.
I'm in the process of hiring to fill a position on my team, and I have to tell you, the way a prospect responds to these two questions is really important for my company. We are looking for someone who has goals in their mind, and can see our company as a way to fulfill them. If you don't have some form of answer for these two questions, you are not fully prepared to work for us at this point in your life. We want people who have lives of their own, and have figured out ways to accomplish things in life. We're not just looking for people to fill seats, and punch a clock everyday. BC.
Agreed. When I owned the software company we had pretty strict guidelines for hiring, and answers to questions like that spoke volumes about a candidate's drive, determination and vision. Candidates that did well on those questions were always at the top of my list, and they helped build the company (for which they were well rewarded). Most of the people that I hired are still with the company, even though it's since been integrated into a larger corporation.
Originally Posted By: Clevy
I hire/fire 100 men a year. I've got guys who drop off resumes daily. I don't even look at them.
That may be the norm for unskilled work. However, in a business where specific advanced skillsets are required, along with a lot of drive and desire to succeed, employees are much more than a disposable commodity. Personally, I'd be embarrassed about that level of turnover in any business that I owned. It speaks volumes about and is a reflection of the management.
 
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40,852
Location
Great Lakes
Originally Posted By: Pop_Rivit
Personally, I'd be embarrassed about that level of turnover in any business that I owned. It speaks volumes about and is a reflection of the management.
Different lines of work require different selection/hiring methodologies. I agree with Clevy that for manual labor, actually seeing what a person can do is a lot more valuable than what they write on the resume.
 
Messages
118
Location
Palm Springs CA
Originally Posted By: Clevy
I hire/fire 100 men a year. I've got guys who drop off resumes daily. I don't even look at them. In my line of work you need a strong back,tough mentality and heart. None of those traits can be inferred from a resume. I hire guys on sight. I give them a week to prove their worth and their wage. After that week we sit down and I tell them their worth to me and they either stay or I cut them a cheque and wish them good luck. I don't care where a man sees himself in 5 years. I care where he sees himself tomorrow,and the next day. I give special considerations to men with families and I'll hold onto them even if they are slightly weaker than other single crew members. These days a man,who takes care of his own is an admirable trait. They are always at work,on time,everyday. I can make money with guys like that. Single men in this business tend to have vices that cut into work. They have less to lose is fired and that reflects in their attendance. A family man tends to see the big picture. Heart can't be seen or felt on paper but when it's -35 and your men are heading onto the site,running to the lumber pile,and hustle hauling to get warm then you see their heart.
Sounds like my Dad....but I mean that in a good way... How have you been????
 
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24,744
Location
Dallas,Tx USA
I
Originally Posted By: Clevy
I hire/fire 100 men a year. I've got guys who drop off resumes daily. I don't even look at them. In my line of work you need a strong back,tough mentality and heart. None of those traits can be inferred from a resume. I hire guys on sight. I give them a week to prove their worth and their wage. After that week we sit down and I tell them their worth to me and they either stay or I cut them a cheque and wish them good luck. I don't care where a man sees himself in 5 years. I care where he sees himself tomorrow,and the next day. I give special considerations to men with families and I'll hold onto them even if they are slightly weaker than other single crew members. These days a man,who takes care of his own is an admirable trait. They are always at work,on time,everyday. I can make money with guys like that. Single men in this business tend to have vices that cut into work. They have less to lose is fired and that reflects in their attendance. A family man tends to see the big picture. Heart can't be seen or felt on paper but when it's -35 and your men are heading onto the site,running to the lumber pile,and hustle hauling to get warm then you see their heart.
VERY well said Clevy!
 
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