What oil and filter for a Tacoma 2.4 L?

Messages
4
Location
MI
Hello everyone, I just got a new Tacoma 2wd with the 2.4 L and am looking to borrow of your expertise to help me make my truck last forever. As of right now I only have 400 miles and I am trying to take it really easy on the break in. I plan on changing the oil at 1000 (or maybe before). I am definately going to use synthetic eventually, probably Mobil 1 5w/30 from Wal Mart. Should I go sraight to this or use dino oil for the first oil change and then switch to the synthetic? Or would some other oil be more appropriate? I was also planning on using the Toyota filters. Does this sould like a good combination? Any advice greatly appreciated!!
 
Messages
34,055
Location
Southern NJ
[Welcome!] Sounds like a good plan. I'd go right to syn. No need to break in with dino. M1 is a fine choice, however, if this is one of those engines that beats up oil quickly and creates sludge, have your oil sampled to see how long you can use it. As you probably already know certain Toyota engines tend to be very hard on oil so you want to keep that in mind if you plan on extended drains. Good luck! [Cheers!]
 

Al

Messages
19,206
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
[Welcome!] Is that engine the 22-RE? If so its a rather loose engine although it lasts forever. I would say go right to the Mobil 1 if that's what you are going to use. I'm sure the Toyota filters are fine. I use the K&N 2009 . If you have the 22-RE that will work. Be advised it is oversoze and is not specified for that vehicle. In general I think K&N gives max flow as well as good efficiency. Good luck with the new ride [Smile]
 
Messages
9,448
Location
USA
Run Synthetic 10W30 year round if you like simple. My family has had unbeatable protection runing 15W50 M1 in the warm months and M1 10W30 dureing the winter months. To date the best wear number in Toyotas has been achieved with Redline synthetic in 10W30 and 5W30. We have owned Toyota cars and trucks since 1971 so I am speaking from experince. So far we have owned vechiles with 1.3,1.4,1.8 2.2,2.4,3.0,2.7 and 4.7 liters of displacment.
 
Messages
1,533
Location
Ephraim
quote:
Originally posted by In A Coma: Hello everyone, I just got a new Tacoma 2wd with the 2.4 L and am looking to borrow of your expertise to help me make my truck last forever. --snip--
Well if you can live through all the ball-joints, shocks, clutches, racks, fuel pumps, etc... You've picked a good truck to "go forever" I know many people with them, I have one, and they do last as long as you change the oils (all of them) the engines are almost bullet proof, although I've met three or four guys that have blown their engines between 150-250K, When I quiz them about what happened I either got that they used the 99-Cent el-cheap-o oil, or they went 10-20K on Regular store-bought dino without analysis. The guys I've met that they last have used everything from Castrol, to Pennzoil, Quaker, M1, and all the other semi-syns... Most have traded or sold them in the 300K's the rest either are wrecked or they keep them 400, 500, some 6 and 700K+. Some flush some don't, but most of them keep an eye on the oil... do this and you will have the truck falling apart and a sound engine that wont want to die |-)
 

rj

Messages
7
Location
Latham, NY
Hi, Only my second post but I've been following the board for a couple of years...LOTS of info here. Since I own a 2001 version of your truck I'll share my thoughts: 1)After reading about (mostly here) and trying several brands, I have settled on Mobil 1 5-30w year round (New York). I found that anything heavier in viscosity increases a "diesel" sound at idle (especially after warm-up)..I have no clue what that means. I have had virtually no oil usage with 4,000+ intervals. I changed out the factory oil at 2500. 5-30w is the "recommended" viscosity in the manual. I may try the 0-20w this winter. 2)You will read lots of speculation about Toyota filters. They seem to be highly regarded. The factory filter is made in Japan..mine came with a 90915-2003. Its hard to find and expensive. The 90915-2004 is easier to find, slightly larger, will also fit, and can be found at Lexus dealers. You won't be able to buy either of these at typical Toyota dealers. 3)Recently I have found a new Toyota "TRD" version of each of the above filters on the web costing $8 to $10. The 90915-2003 becomes the 90915-004 ($10) in its TRD version. The 90915-2004 becomes the 90915-007 ($8) in its TRD version...I know the #'s don't seem to make sense. I ordered a few 90915-004's and haven't received them yet. I believe you probably can't go wrong with any Toyota filter. Hope this helps....
 
Messages
73
Location
WA
I too, also bought a new 2003 Tacoma this summer, the Xtra Cab 4x4 w/the 2.7L I4 engine. I did it's first oil and filter change at 1000 miles, then 3000 miles, and just recently, 5000 miles, at which time, I made the switch to synthetic oil, Mobil 1 5W-30. I'll start to do my oil and filter change now every 5000 miles. You'll hear suggestions on when to switch to synthetic, from the first oil change, at 1000 miles, all the way up to 10,000 miles, which Toyota mechanics I've talked to, recommend. I simply took the the average, and went for 5000 miles. The first oil change is very important, as I see it, mainly to flush the engine of any possible machining chips and casting sand, due to it's manufacture, and metal particles, due to it's being broken in. I also changed all the powertrain oils (front and rear differential, transfer case, and manual transmission) at 5000 miles, for the same reasons as the first engine oil change. I put Mobil 1 gear oil in both the transmission and the rear differential, and regular dino gear oil in the front differental and the transfer case. I stayed w/the dino oil w/the front differental and the transfer case, because they only have around 100 miles on them, while the rest of the powertrain, the transmission and rear differential, has 5000 miles. I'll switch everything over to synthetic next year. As for the oil filter, I use the Toyota/Lexus 90915-20004 oil filter, which fits w/o any problems on the 2.7L I4. I don't know if it'll fit the 2.4L I4. Do a search here on it and you'll see why I picked it rather than the standard Toyota recommended 08922-02011 for the 2.7L. [ September 12, 2003, 11:01 PM: Message edited by: GoHack ]
 
Messages
35
Location
Northern California
My 88 2.4 Toy 4X4 really likes the M1 0W-40 w/K&N oil filter. Quiet startup, very decent gas mileage, and the 40W gives it added protection for when I tow my 1400lb boat fishing. Initially tried 15W-50 M1 because of the towing, but experienced slightly noisy startup and not so good mpg thru winter months, mpg jump was immediately noticable on first tank of gas with the 0W-40. Been running M1 w/6K changes for 45K miles on a Toyota dealer rebuilt 22RE.
 
Messages
1,310
Location
Scottsdale, AZ
Go to the favorite links section that are archived to find a Toyota discount dealer. I think a couple of bucks cheaper per filter than as stated above. [Welcome!]
 

Al

Messages
19,206
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
quote:
Originally posted by jetfishn: 40W gives it added protection for when I tow my 1400lb boat fishing.
[Off Topic!] Wow - I can't imagine towing with the 22-RE. Especially in summertime when the electric fans turn on.
 
Messages
9,448
Location
USA
The only thing that I have seen with the 2.7 that needs close attention is the chain tensioners. We had to replace one of my Dads timeing chain tensioners at 120,000 miles. This is the first time we have ever had to open a Toyota engine up with less then 200,000 miles on it due to a mechanical issue. Toyota uses several chains and tensioners in this engine. The syptom to look for is the sound of valve clatter. It is not valve clater at all it is the chain smaking against the tension and guide while oil pressure is coming up. This may very well had been a fluke but I would watch it. To date his valve train is still within factory new spec.'s We replaced his chains and the main sprockets even though they appeared to be in perfect shape.
 

rj

Messages
7
Location
Latham, NY
Would the chain tensioner noise vary with oil viscosity? The 90915-2004 oil filter easily fits the 2.4L [ September 13, 2003, 11:20 AM: Message edited by: rj ]
 
Messages
9,448
Location
USA
No, The tensioner was simply defective. The vechile first did this with M1 10W30 in it. I too though that it might be viscosity related combined with some possable build up. So I ran a quart of Marvels Myster Oil through it for a week and it did nothing to improve it. If it had been an oil issue a new one would not have solved the problem!
 
Messages
73
Location
WA
quote:
The only thing that I have seen with the 2.7 that needs close attention is the chain tensioners. We had to replace one of my Dads timeing chain tensioners at 120,000 miles. This is the first time we have ever had to open a Toyota engine up with less then 200,000 miles on it due to a mechanical issue. Toyota uses several chains and tensioners in this engine. The syptom to look for is the sound of valve clatter. It is not valve clater at all it is the chain smaking against the tension and guide while oil pressure is coming up. This may very well had been a fluke but I would watch it. To date his valve train is still within factory new spec.'s We replaced his chains and the main sprockets even though they appeared to be in perfect shape.
The timing chain and tensioner has to be replaced at some point. Anyone know what it is on the 2.7L I4? If I remember correctly, the recommended replacement of the timing chain and tensioner on the 22RE is between 130,000 to 150,000 miles max. Having it checked starting around 130,000 miles. I'm sure they can go earlier, depending on maintenance history. I believe the 22RE doesn't have any valve clearance. Valve clearance meaning, that there isn't any chance of the valve being hit and damaged by the piston, should the chain jump a tooth or break. To go 200,000 w/o having ever changed a cam chain and tensioner, or a belt for that matter, is crazy. That's pushing it, as I see it. [ September 13, 2003, 09:56 PM: Message edited by: GoHack ]
 
Messages
52
Location
florida
I specialize in building toyota pickups and 4runners, and have tons of experience with the 22r/e. My own engine is a very modified, stroked 22r. Like an earlier poster, I have run m1 15-50, and m1 0-40. the 0-40 caused the fuel mileage to go up.6 mpg, with improved acceleration. I think your taco 2cam will do fine with the 0-40. I also tow a 1700 # camper in florida - although in the summer when I'm towing I bite the bullet and run 15-50. -steve
 
Messages
9,448
Location
USA
GoHack, I was not clear in my post.By opened up I was refering to the level to wich we had to tear into the engine to replace these parts. The 22RE engine is simple to replace the timeing chain especialy if the crank sprocket is not replaced. THe tensioner is also not that difacult to replace. You simple remove the valve cover, remove the distributo drive gear from the cam to pop the cahin off. The 22RE only has one chain! If you want to remove the tension you simply emove the belts and the timeing cover. Worst case if you had to change both gears/sprokets and the chain you can do the job rather quickly. To cahnge the timeing chains, sprockets, ballance shaft sprockets,chains and tensioners on the 2.7 is a nightmare by comparison. You must remove the oil pan, radiator, timeing cover and cylinder head and accesories...... In the amount of time it took to do the chains and tensioners on this thing I could have rebuilt the entire engine. Granted it was the first time I had touched the 2.7 but it still was not easy like a 22RE. P.S. I left out a few steps to keep the post brief! P.P.S. Toyota Steve I have a stroker kit as well. I got one of the last ones through RC Enginering a long time ago. [ September 14, 2003, 01:41 AM: Message edited by: JohnBrowning ]
 
Messages
73
Location
WA
JohnBrowning: It does sound like a nightmare. Isn't there some advantage to having short chains vs. one large one? I would think the longer one would have a tendency to stretch easier than the short one? How many cam chains are in the 2.7L I4? I've never seen a cutaway of it. Are there any pluses or minuses about the 2.7L, other than what you have just mentioned, say vs. the 22RE?
 
Messages
52
Location
florida
John Browning - Your info on chain replacement on the 22r engine in simplistic and incorrect. You cannot remove the chain by removing only the valve cover and dist. Think about it, how are you going to get it on and off the crank without removing the balancer, oil pump, drive spline, and timing cover? also removing the cover mandates removing ALL of the accessories, belts, and fan, and of course there isn't enough room to effectively do this job with the radiator in place. I do on average 2 to 3 of these jobs every month. I also modify steel chain guides into the 85 - 95 models with every chain replacement. given the 22r's propensity to eat through timing covers, using the stock plastic guides seems a disservice to the rest of the engine... Also, my stroker kit is something I developed, I didn't buy any of it already packaged. It provides 4.5mm stroke increase, and this engine has 1.5mm bore increase. because it was done with off the shelf parts from other engines, it only cost me a couple hundred dollars more to build than a stocker. Lotsa math up front, but it was worth it. to be honest, it runs VERY much like a taco 2.7 4cyl, which I think is a very nice engine. Sorry, I have minimal experience with these new 2.4's and 2.7's, as they're just starting to trickle in... Steve
 
Messages
52
Location
florida
Gohack - on advantages of the 2.7 over the 22re, let me say that the 2.7 is the logical outgrowth of the 22re. the older engine was pretty grossly underpowered in my aplications. You might imagine what it was like in my '91 4runner, ac on, trying to tow a 1700# trailer. The 2.7 has - if I remember correctly - app 1/4" more stroke and about 1/8" more bore. the crank dimmensions are the same as 22r, which can handle 4x the horsepower it's subject to. The 2.7 utilizes a 4v head, so the airflow is superior. also, the newer fuel injection adopted in '96 is superior to the old electronic bosch unit that utilized the afm, which was limiting and non responsive. One thing I have found common to both fuel injection units is the flatness under 3000 rpm on light to moderate throttle, due to lean fuel mapping. I really dislike the lack of torque it presents, and also the "cammy" feel the engines have. this is due to toyota's programming for fuel efficiency under light throttle. Richening up the lower rpm circuits reveals a much more spunky engine, and this is common to all the fi engines from toyota. I put a weber 38 carb on my previously fi'd 4runner (!) just to get the bottom end torque increase. Careful jetting utilizing a mixture meter and a vacuum guage has provided me with the same fuel economy that a fi'd engine would have. Unfortunately, I think the only way to do this with the taco would be to send the computer out for remapping. Sorry for the overload... Steve
 
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