What constitutes a used up bypass oil filter

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24,979
Location
Upstate NY
If I ran an Amsoil bypass oil filter until the outside of the can no longer got hot meaning no oil was flowing through, then pulled it from service and cut it apart, what would it look like? An inch of black crud on the filter media. Or just clogged filter media that is difficult to detect visually.
 
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469
Location
Kingman, Arizona
I've been using the temperature of the by pass filter for the time to replace the filter. This is what I learned from old time mechanics that worked on engines that only had a by pass oil filter. It has worked for me for more years than I care to remember
 

dnewton3

Staff member
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8,459
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Indianapolis, IN
Donald - are you just asking because you're curious? Or do you have an application actually in use? If you run the BP element until the flow is low enough that the canister is cool to the touch, they the BP is essentially blinded off and not flowing anything to speak of. (likely flowing some, but not enough to make a tangible difference). The BP element will catch pretty much any particle that is about 2-3um or larger, so yes, it will catch soot once the soot gets that large. (Soot starts out WAY smaller, so it takes a fairly long OCI to get to that state).
 
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10,003
Location
Waco, TX
Originally Posted by dnewton3
The BP element will catch pretty much any particle that is about 2-3um or larger, so yes, it will catch soot once the soot gets that large. (Soot starts out WAY smaller, so it takes a fairly long OCI to get to that state).
I would say 99.999% of all diesel engine oil soot is smaller than 1 micron and won't be trapped by the bypass filter. . However, I seen multiple reports where a bypass filter makes big changes in particle count reductions. So that is something. . . . .
 
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