Welding machines

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Originally Posted by Black_Thunder
I really like my Hobart 140 and its served me well and I have seen used ones on craiglist and marketplace often, mainly because ppl will buy them for a couple projects and then end up not using them again. whenever you decide to tackle your job make sure you play with the welder a bit on some scrap pieces so you can get the settings dialed in etc.
I've got the 135 nice for thin stuff. Had it for years. I prefer my lincoln Tomb stone For heavy stuff like this. If I was doing this I'd clean it bright and heat [censored] out of it with a propane turbo torch and weld it while heating . Keep the torch on it till done then slowly play it around letting it cool SLOOOOOWWWWLLLLY as possible. I've done a few cast goodies like this and it worked . On the other hand your issue is rather shall we say structural in nature. People do lean on these things after all. I know a guy who got a serious skull fracture from just such a fix , not pretty. So if it ain't strong toss it......... I think if it were mine I'd weld it and see if I could fit a steel strap piece along the bottom a few inches on both pieces . Drill and tap a couple screws on both surfaces That would greatly strengthen it and hold it together if someone managed to bust the weld .
 
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Originally Posted by Driz
If I was doing this I'd clean it bright and heat [censored] out of it with a propane turbo torch and weld it while heating . Keep the torch on it till done then slowly play it around letting it cool SLOOOOOWWWWLLLLY as possible. I've done a few cast goodies like this and it worked . On the other hand your issue is rather shall we say structural in nature. People do lean on the.
If its truly cast or wrought iron, thats what i would do too, but i'm thinking this is steel.
 
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Please accept my most humble and sincere apologies if anyone feels I came across as a "know it all." That was NOT my intention; it was only my intention to express that the end result need be somewhat sturdy....Kind of obvious, I thought, but anyhow, there's been lot's of good brainstorming suggestions here; like a local trade school or muffler shop or borrowing a welding machine. BITOG is good sometimes to help think outside the box. Hopefully the OP has some fresh ideas now. As a typical homeowner, I share frustration with sometimes needing to do some form of maintenance requiring a skill that I do not possess; yet knowing that those who possess such needed skills would consider what I need to be trivial. cheers
Originally Posted by maxdustington
Originally Posted by Ihatetochangeoil
My final two cents worth to Ursatdx; no disrespect, but there's quite a difference between anything made by welding/soldering/brazing that simply hangs on a wall vs. a handrail which must meet local building codes and if it were OSHA, must withstand a 200 lb. side load without failure. I question if what is pictured could have done that when new.
Originally Posted by Donald
Is the railing ornamental or safety? If its safety I would find someone. Have you looked under Services on Craigslist? The concern is with no welding skills you might make welds that look good but are not strong. I took an evening welding class and after we did the weld we put it in a press to try and break it. Often the weld was not deep enough although it looked fine. You will not be able to judge that with no experience.
Know-it-alls know everything except the meaning of a homeowner repair. As long as OP keeps his handrail away from hydaulic presses, he should be fine to weld it with a cheap 110v flux core MIG. OP already said the job was too small to call a pro, read the first post!
 
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Worst Case, Ontario
Originally Posted by spasm3
Originally Posted by Driz
If I was doing this I'd clean it bright and heat [censored] out of it with a propane turbo torch and weld it while heating . Keep the torch on it till done then slowly play it around letting it cool SLOOOOOWWWWLLLLY as possible. I've done a few cast goodies like this and it worked . On the other hand your issue is rather shall we say structural in nature. People do lean on the.
If its truly cast or wrought iron, thats what i would do too, but i'm thinking this is steel.
99% chance it's mild steel. I've seen a lot of porches that have that railing that looks like iron, they usually rust out where they put the steel directly into the concrete. A fat dude must have lived in OP's house at one point and reefed on that railing.
 
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My son tells me that All of the rental stores here have 110v Lincoln's for rent. May be your best option
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted by maxdustington
99% chance it's mild steel. I've seen a lot of porches that have that railing that looks like iron, they usually rust out where they put the steel directly into the concrete. A fat dude must have lived in OP's house at one point and reefed on that railing.
You're probably right about it being steel. As I indicated before, we have four railings, and only this one, at the very top of the stairs, failed. All the others are strong and tight in place. No fat folks, though once UPS left the storm door unlatched in a windstorm. The neighbor gave the report after we got back. They had secured it but not too soon - railing made a major mark on the door, and the door made a major mark on the railing!
 
Joined
Sep 23, 2006
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Wisconsin
Originally Posted by Driz
Originally Posted by Black_Thunder
I really like my Hobart 140 and its served me well and I have seen used ones on craiglist and marketplace often, mainly because ppl will buy them for a couple projects and then end up not using them again. whenever you decide to tackle your job make sure you play with the welder a bit on some scrap pieces so you can get the settings dialed in etc.
I've got the 135 nice for thin stuff. Had it for years. I prefer my lincoln Tomb stone For heavy stuff like this. If I was doing this I'd clean it bright and heat [censored] out of it with a propane turbo torch and weld it while heating . Keep the torch on it till done then slowly play it around letting it cool SLOOOOOWWWWLLLLY as possible. I've done a few cast goodies like this and it worked . On the other hand your issue is rather shall we say structural in nature. People do lean on these things after all. I know a guy who got a serious skull fracture from just such a fix , not pretty. So if it ain't strong toss it......... I think if it were mine I'd weld it and see if I could fit a steel strap piece along the bottom a few inches on both pieces . Drill and tap a couple screws on both surfaces That would greatly strengthen it and hold it together if someone managed to bust the weld .
I've welded up to 1/4 inch thick steel with the 140 so I don't think welding that railing up would be a problem with it or a similar size welder. Indeed if you can rent a 110v welder that would be the way to go unless you think you need a small welder for oddjobs etc they do come in handy. I use mine a lot on exhaust work or for my trailers etc. Even patched the frame on a beater vehicle last year.
 
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Look at the sparks as you grind. Cast iron won't have as much of a yellow spray as steel will. That may help you determine your welding approach.
 
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