Weird feeling while on a swing...

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Was with the kids the other day when I decided to get on the swings.As I started to swing,I felt this very weird feeling,like I was going to fall off the swing or something.I had to get off right away. I'm wondering if I can't even tolerate the centrifugal or g-force of a darn swing. Does that mean that I might be really out of shape?
 
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I also suspect inner ear issues. If you are out of shape and have higher blood pressure, you may actually be more tolerant of "G" forces.
 

JHZR2

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Vertigo type issues? I suppose everyone is a little different, and peoples' tolerance changes in time.
 
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Originally Posted By: daves66nova
Was with the kids the other day when I decided to get on the swings.As I started to swing,I felt this very weird feeling,like I was going to fall off the swing or something.I had to get off right away. I'm wondering if I can't even tolerate the centrifugal or g-force of a darn swing. Does that mean that I might be really out of shape?
You felt "dizzy" I would see a ear/nose/throat specialist. I had a condition that I somehow grew out of, I would loose balance and couldn't even walk. The specialist could not find the root cause.
Quote:
Vertigo is a specific type of dizziness experienced as an illusion of movement of one's self or the environment. Some experience dizziness in the form of motion sickness. Dizziness, vertigo, and motion sickness all relate to the sense of balance and equilibrium. Your sense of balance is maintained by a complex interaction of the following parts of the nervous system: •The inner ear, which monitors the directions of motion, such as turning, rolling, forward-backward, side-to-side, and up-and-down motions. •The eyes, which monitor where the body is in space and also directions of motion. •The pressure receptors in the joints of the lower extremeties and the spine, which tell what part of the body is down and touching the ground. •The muscle and joint sensory receptors tell what parts of the body are moving. •The central nervous system (brain and spinal cord), which processes all the information from the four other systems to maintain balance and equilibrium. What causes dizziness? •Circulation: If your brain does not get enough blood flow, you feel lightheaded. If the inner ear fails to receive enough blood flow, the more specific type of dizziness - vertigo - occurs. •Neurological diseases: A number of diseases of the nerves can affect balance, such as multiple sclerosis, syphilis, tumors, etc. These are uncommon causes, but your doctor may perform certain tests to evaluate these. •Anxiety: Anxiety can be a cause of dizziness and lightheadedness. •Vertigo: An unpleasant sensation of the world rotating, usually associated with nausea and vomiting. Vertigo usually is due to an issue with the inner ear. The common causes of vertigo are (in order): ◦Benign Positional Vertigo: Vertigo is experienced after a change in head position such as lying down, turning in bed, looking up, or stooping. It lasts about 30 seconds and ceases when the head is still. It can last for days, weeks, or months, The Epley "repositioning" treatment by an otolaryngologist is usually curative. ◦Meniere's disease: An inner ear disorder with attacks of vertigo, nausea, or vomiting, and tinnitus in the ear, which often feels blocked or full. There is usually a decrease in hearing as well. ◦Migraine: Some individuals with a prior classical migraine headache history can experience vertigo attacks similar to Meniere's disease. ◦Infection: Viruses can attack the inner ear, but usually its nerve connections to the brain, causing acute vertigo without hearing loss. However, a bacterial infection such as mastoiditis that extends into the inner ear can completely destroy both the hearing and equilibrium function of that ear, called labyrinthitis ◦Injury: A skull fracture that damages the inner ear produces a profound and incapacitating vertigo with nausea and hearing loss. ◦Allergy: Some people experience dizziness and/or vertigo attacks when they are exposed to foods or airborne particles to which they are allergic
 
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If nothing else makes you dizzy and this is the first time in 20 years since you've been on a swing, it may be that you just need to get used to it. At least, that was my experience with my kids. Take a few days off, try again but don't go very high. Build up to it slowly.
 

daves66nova

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It wasnt a dizzy feeling.I don't ever feel dizzy.I'm 5'6" 180lbs and never work out.I do get winded when I do certain things.My blood pressure is normal to a little under normal.I think it's more a feling like when you descend quickly on a rollercoaster.
 
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What you're describing is one of the ways vertigo presents itself. An ENT doc will know more, and I suggestion you see one. The could be something like a vitamin deficiency or something minor like a piece of debris stuck in your ear preventing it from evacuating mucus, or a small infection. None of these fall into the "serious" category at this stage. See a doc, have it checked out. Most of the time it's something minor they can correct in their office or with a script.
 
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Originally Posted By: daves66nova
It wasnt a dizzy feeling.I don't ever feel dizzy.I'm 5'6" 180lbs and never work out.I do get winded when I do certain things.My blood pressure is normal to a little under normal.I think it's more a feling like when you descend quickly on a rollercoaster.
I sense you use diet products. Go thru an elimination process with some of these for overdosing on saccharin, nutrasweet...etc. Also, did you change (or) are you recently eating things that contain a high amount of oils.....ie.... corn, canola.....etc?
 
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That sounds similar to how I felt getting on a swing for the first time in 20 years or so. It went away with a little practice. My totally unqualified opinion is that I wouldn't go to a doctor just yet. Start slow and see if it keeps happening, or just don't swing. In my early twenties, I started to feel sick on planes and on carnival rides that I liked as a kid. I count myself lucky that it doesn't happen on planes any longer. My dad gets airsick and takes daily motion sickness medication so he can drive.
 

JHZR2

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Originally Posted By: raytseng
you still failed to state how old you were. If you're over 35, welcome to middle-age.
Phew, not there yet. But I dont plan to be middle aged until at least 50.
 

daves66nova

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Originally Posted By: Triple_Se7en
Originally Posted By: daves66nova
It wasnt a dizzy feeling.I don't ever feel dizzy.I'm 5'6" 180lbs and never work out.I do get winded when I do certain things.My blood pressure is normal to a little under normal.I think it's more a feling like when you descend quickly on a rollercoaster.
I sense you use diet products. Go thru an elimination process with some of these for overdosing on saccharin, nutrasweet...etc. Also, did you change (or) are you recently eating things that contain a high amount of oils.....ie.... corn, canola.....etc?
I don't ever use saccharin or any sweetener at all. I do drink a lot of Iced Tea,but never with any sugar or sweetener.I haven't changed eating habits;fast food at work,home cooking at home.
 
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