Want a Universal Oil for 3 cars

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403
Location
California
I currently have 3 cars and would like to standardize on an oil and weight to simplify my purchasing. I recently switched to Mobil 1 for all three, but I'm using 2 differnt weights. I'm currently using 5w30 in 2 of them and 10w30 in the other. Here's the vital statistics: Summer: 85-110, mostly 90-95 degrees. Winter: 20-45, rarely below freezing Car 1: '02 Ford Explorer SOHC V6 (Odometer 3600) - Ford recommends 5w30, 3000 or 5000 mile drain intervals. Car 2: '93 Toyota Camry V6 - (Odometer 99,000) Toyota recommends 10w30 (I think) with 3000, 5000 mile drain intervals. Car 3: '91 Ford Explorer OHV 4.0 V6. (Odometer 88,000) Ford recommends 10w30 with 3000, 5000 mile drain intervals. Est. Annual Mileages Car1: 12,000 Car2: 10,000 Car3: 1500 If I want to go with a universal oil then 5w30 is it because of the warantee on the new vehicle. If a 5w30 will work well in the others then I have no problem with that. Is 5w30 M1 SS good for '91 explorer even though it asks for 5w30? Based upon the oil comparison chart recently posted on this site, the viscosity at 100C degrees seems a bit lower (thinner) than the other oils in the same weight range. But the 10w30 and 5w30 M1 look almost identical at temperature so I don't see any big advantage to running 10w30 M1 Vs 5w30 M1. Is the viscosity at 100C degrees a good indication of the lubrication properties at operating temperatures (higher being better)? Would appreciate feedback and suggestions
 
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8,937
Location
SC
Using 10w30 in a vehicle where the mfg recommends 5w30 is not going to void your warranty. I'd use the Mobil 1 10w30 in all three. For the temps you experience, this will give you the best all round protection.
 

MolaKule

Staff member
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21,602
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Iowegia - USA
Mr. Giles, [Welcome!] to Oil Freaks Anonymous (er, the oil board). Look again at the '02 Explorer's oil viscosity chart. If it says you can use 10W30 for temperatures between 32 F and 100 F, then 10W30 is your choice. You get a slighter thicker (average) oil film with 10W30 than with 5W30. If not, then you could still go with 5W30 for your entire "fleet." Slightly less protection, but still enough for daily driving. If possible, do a Used OIl Analysis sampled each 3k to 5k and let us know the results. [ December 06, 2002, 02:57 PM: Message edited by: MolaKule ]
 

Giles

Thread starter
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403
Location
California
Thanks for the replies. I admit I'm a bit obsessed with Oil and lubrication in general since I've found this and other sites. The more I learn though, the less I know...
 
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903
Location
CA
quote:
Originally posted by rgiles: snip The more I learn though, the less I know...
You're a wise man and smarter than me.
 
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4,806
Location
Lakeville, MN
If the Explorer manual is true to form from Ford these days, it will recommend 5w30 only. No charts for temps, etc... Based on your temps though, the 10w30 should be fine.
 

Giles

Thread starter
Messages
403
Location
California
The consensus at this point seems to be that any would work, but 10w30 is better than 5w30. I was beginning to think the lighter oils were better because they are quicker to lube on startup and might have some cooling benefit. Is the lighter oils only benefit gas mileage and is that why the car companies are moving that direction? What about the 0w40 that is recommended in Mercedes? Why do you suppose they are going with a lighter weight of oil?
 
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4,107
Location
Savannah, GA
quote:
Originally posted by MNgopher: If the Explorer manual is true to form from Ford these days, it will recommend 5w30 only. No charts for temps, etc... Based on your temps though, the 10w30 should be fine.
Right you are Gopher!!! My 02 Explorer's manual only says 5W30, unfortunatley there is no reference to 10W30 [Thumbs Down!] -Joe [ December 06, 2002, 08:24 PM: Message edited by: joee12 ]
 
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718
Location
Central Texas
I believe 10w-30 would serve very well in every vehicle you own. My 98 Ford F-150 4.2L V-6 called for 5w-30 with no other options or temp charts. Can't remember if I just ignored Mr. Fords advise or just wasn't paying attention but for the first 100,000 miles used 10w-30 Penn , then 25,000 more with Mobil 1 10w-30 and the last 3000 with Schaeffer's 7000 series 15w-40. No problems, no oil consumption, no leaks, no cold morning hard starts ( even at 25*f with the 15w-40) or valve noises.
 

Giles

Thread starter
Messages
403
Location
California
quote:
Originally posted by Neil: I believe 10w-30 would serve very well in every vehicle you own. My 98 Ford F-150 4.2L V-6 called for 5w-30 with no other options or temp charts. Can't remember if I just ignored Mr. Fords advise or just wasn't paying attention but for the first 100,000 miles used 10w-30 Penn , then 25,000 more with Mobil 1 10w-30 and the last 3000 with Schaeffer's 7000 series 15w-40. No problems, no oil consumption, no leaks, no cold morning hard starts ( even at 25*f with the 15w-40) or valve noises.
Thanks for the feedback. Out of curiosity, why did you go to a higher weight oil when you switched to the Schaeffers?
 

Patman

Staff member
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21,989
Location
Oakville, Ontario
I don't understand what is wrong with buying two different weights of oil for your cars? [I dont know] It's best to run the proper viscosity in each, not try to have a universal oil for everything. Why not run the optimal choice in each, even if it's three different oils?
 

Giles

Thread starter
Messages
403
Location
California
quote:
Originally posted by Patman: I don't understand what is wrong with buying two different weights of oil for your cars? [I dont know] It's best to run the proper viscosity in each, not try to have a universal oil for everything. Why not run the optimal choice in each, even if it's three different oils?
The biggest reason is so I could consider buying bulk oil and get discounts. It just simplifies the storage and planning. There doesn't seem to be much difference between 5w30 and 10w30 spec wise and given my moderate climates it seems like a reasonable thing to consider. Also, I'm not sure if the manufacturers are specifying a specific weight to maximize the life of the engine or for other reasons.
 
Messages
718
Location
Central Texas
rgiles I've always wanted to go with one oil for the tractors, pick-up, garden/lawn equipment, and cars. But I was worried about the heaver weight and ash content of the oils needed for the tractors being used in my pick-up and wifes car. Additionally, I've seen more than a few internet shouting matches over the wisdom of using HD oils in light duty vehicles. A few months ago I had the opportunity to talk to a local utility mechanic and he stated they used the same oil in every application. Currently Chevron 400 15w-40 but this could change yearly with the supply contract. But always 15w-40 oils. When ordering my first Schaeffer's order Bob convinced me in this climate 15w-40 would do fine. So far no big results to report just on my first change in the F-150 and Saturn. The tractors definitely start easier with the Schaeffers than they did on the John Deere mineral 15w-40. My wifes Saturn, a 1 quart every 3k oil addict, now uses around 12 oz every 3k. The big test will be if we get to our record low this winter. Records around here are set at 10*f and rarely set at that. Have not seen the bottom side of 25*f in 3 or 4 years.
 

Patman

Staff member
Messages
21,989
Location
Oakville, Ontario
I'm not trying to talk you into Schaeffer oil in particular-although the stuff is awesome! [Smile] , however if you were to order their oil in bulk, you could mix and match viscosities if you wish and still get a discount. For instance, to get the free shipping you need to order $250 worth of stuff, but you could order a few cases of 10w30, a few cases of 5w30 and a few cases of 15w40 if you wished. If you do decide on just one oil, 5w30 might be the better choice simply for the warranty purposes. If that isn't a consideration, I'd go with the 10w30 myself. [ December 07, 2002, 08:12 PM: Message edited by: Patman ]
 
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