Video Of Santee California Plane Crash

billt460

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My neighbor had a Skymaster and just bought some kind of Cessna pressurized twin with a seperation for the pilots and a bathroom which is a necessity for me to be in an aircraft.. He spent a few weeks at some training facility before he flew the plane, the guy is under 40 and really smart.

From what I understand, you cannot get your multi engine license in a Skymaster, because you cannot learn how do deal with asymmetrical thrust in one. They fly like a single on one engine or both.
 
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From what I understand, you cannot get your multi engine license in a Skymaster, because you cannot learn how do deal with asymmetrical thrust in one. They fly like a single on one engine or both.
You can get a multi-engine rating in the Skymaster, but if you do, your rating comes with a centerline thrust limitation.
 

Astro14

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Blancolirio had a good discussion. Wasn’t able to finish it, but his analysis is always spot on.

The IFR, circle to land, autopilot off, and, of course, doctor, confluence of factors has me thinking spatial disorientation and subsequent loss of control…
 
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I hadn’t heard that one but yeah pretty much the same thing.

As far as accidents. It does seem like that but like you said without the actual data we won’t know for a bit. I kind of feel it’s a lot like other things like shootings etc. due to social media we hear about things all the time so it feels like it’s more than ever when it’s really just that we never used to have all this information at our fingertips immediately.
The accident rate appears to be down, at least from recent FAA stats published in Kathryn's Report. Maybe they just get more coverage then in the recent past.

From Kathryn's Report;
According to FAA’s statistics, 0.96 aviation fatalities occurred every 100,000 flight hours in 2019, before the coronavirus began to spread in the U.S. In 2020, that rate decreased to 0.91. And in 2021, after the COVID-19 vaccines became available, it reached 0.74, its lowest point in at least the last six years.
 
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but you can fly a T38 I believe:) IIRC they are also in that category. Others here can confirm.
Even though the T38 is considered centerline thrust, it is a jet which requires its own type rating.
I understand you cross the controls to compensate for the dead engine.
That was how we would induce a spin in the 152.
Folks who fly ME correct me if I'm wrong, but I do not think the standard engine out procedure uses cross controls. Lots of rudder and a little aileron both away from the dead engine.

That said, cross controlling isn't all that unusual. It's standard procedure for any crosswind landing, and for a slip to landing.
 
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It's been a few years but you bank into the dead engine about 5 degrees and fly blue line on the air speed indicator. It's definitely controllable but you may have to live with a minimum sink rate if high or heavy.
 
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If you do bank slightly into the dead engine, I would imagine that is because doing so creates a bit more drag on the opposite side, and less drag on the dead side.

That's because the aileron sticking up behind the dead engine reduces AoA of that wing, and the aileron sticking down behind the live engine increases AoA of that wing, and AoA correlates to induced drag. Same reason in ground handling taildraggers, if you need more turning authority than the rudder & tailwheel can provide, you can add aileron, banking opposite the direction you want to turn in order to facilitate the turn. You can feel this effect in tricycle gear airplanes too, it's just less effective.

PS: this notion that banking creates differential induced drag that tries to yaw the plane in the direction opposite the bank is called adverse yaw.
 
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Don’t want to cross control on a single engine.

“Dead Foot, Dead Engine” and “Raise the Dead” are two good reminders when flying multi engine.

So a left engine failure would mean, push right rudder (left foot dead) and right roll slightly (raise the dead on the left). Rudder is primary to keep the plane under control, and “raising the dead” fine-tunes things and reduces sideslip (drag). The inclinometer/ball will not be centered so it kind of looks like you could be cross-controlled from the instrument, but it’s what you want. On many piston twins the ball ends up being about 1/2 ball-width off-center, towards the good engine.
 
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billt460

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This is a recorded radio transmission of the final few minutes of that flight. Along with what appears to be a computer generated video of the same. Scroll down a bit to see the video, and hear the soundtrack. Seems really strange. Almost as if he became incapacitated.

 
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Hmm. Wonder if he became disoriented due to a CO2 leak?
You mean CO (carbon monoxide), a combustion waste gas.
CO2 is carbon dioxide, a respiratory waste product.

Not likely with a Cessna twin.
Heater is an internal mounted combustion heater installed in the nose. Not likely in use at time of accident.
 
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The dead side falls as the running engines lifts the side. Kind of like a wing mounted engine lifts the nose and on a rear engine plane lowers the nose?
 
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MolaKule

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You mean CO (carbon monoxide), a combustion waste gas.
CO2 is carbon dioxide, a respiratory waste product.

Not likely with a Cessna twin.
Heater is an internal mounted combustion heater installed in the nose. Not likely in use at time of accident.
Yes, the post wasn't completed for some reason. Here is the corrected post:

Hmm. Wonder if he became disoriented due to a CO leak from the engine or a buildup of excessive C02 in the cabin?

I added the question mark because I was unsure of the design of the environmental system, but thanks for the extra information.(y)
 
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