USA OEM oil requirements vs world/engine problems

Messages
1,330
Location
Scottsdale, AZ
This thought popped into my head on the way to work today. If you used a different weight oil that was "required" by your manual and something went wrong in the engine and the dealership blamed it on you using the wrong oil (but it is an oil that is used in other countries in the same motor. ie: my '93 3VZ-E is spec'ed here for 10w30 (5w30 for much colder temps)only, but I think a 20w50 is stated suitable for use in Australia in high temps in the same engine), could you use the Aussie specs to show the dealer they are full of garbage...and make them pay up? I don't see how any car manufacturer that sells cars overseas with different oil weight specs than ones sold here can void a warranty due to this fact. The oil would have to be one stated "OK for use" in a foreign manual, remember.
 
Messages
437
Location
va
I'd like to know what ford recommends for the 4.6, like in the crown vic and f150, if they even sell cars there. since almost everyone says these engines have small clearances and anything thicker than the now recommended 5w20 (was 10w30 for my 92 vic) can cause engine damage. I put 10w40 in mine anyway though, It'd be nice to know for sure rather it's a bad thing or not.
 

tpi

Messages
200
Location
So. CA
Has anyone had coverage denied because of unspecified viscosity grade usage? I've owned new cars over the last 30 years and had warranty work on two engines. One for a leaking rear main seal, the other for a burned exhaust valve. Neither of these were checked for oil viscosity. Sometimes I use what is specified, sometimes I don't depending on weather and intended use. From my experience if it looks like oil, the engine is clean, and the flow properties are somewhat close to the perception of "oil" I've been OK.
 
Messages
625
Location
Silver Spring, MD (USA)
Depending on the engine damage, length of time the oil's been in the engine, and type of oil... Wouldn't it be kinda of hard to figure out the exact viscosity? I mean most 30 weights usually turn into 20 wt's after a few thousand miles... And some oils thicken up over time...
 
Messages
9,448
Location
USA
It is always a "Us V.S. Them" mantality when dealing with dealerships or corprate entitys. They are always looking for any way that they can to reduce warranty costs. You never volanteer informantion and if you think something can be used against you play stupid and say I do not know! If the dealership thinks something is up make them work to figure it out. Most OEM are trying to keep their warranty cost per vechile under $100 dollars. Right know all the big players are in the $70-$140 ball park. In order to keep it down corperate puts a lot of pressure on dealers to try to do as little as possable under warranty! Area service mangers will try to weasel out of any major claim they think they can. P.S. If you took them to court they would have to prove that your failure was oil related and that your lack of adherence to the recomendations caused the failure! THe prblem is that in the meantime you do not have a ride and layer fees are going to be adding up!
 
Messages
1,488
Location
Los Angeles
quote:
Originally posted by XS650:
quote:
Originally posted by SSDude: How would anyone know what type of oil you used unless you told them?
UOAs are so common that even some Car companies have heard of them. [LOL!] If you go in for a warranty claim and there is any reason to suspect the wrong oil, a dealer would be remiss to not get a good UOA. Although I doubt that very many do. When I was doing vehicle develpment work 15 years ago, the first thing the engine manufacturer wanted when an engine failed was a UOA. Some of that must have filtered down to the retail level by now.

UOA are sometimes unreliable. Oils sometimes shear out of grade. In additions sometimes they oxidize and thicken.
 
Messages
1,251
Location
Akron, OH
If your engine fails and then the car company tries to deny your claim based on a UOA, that UOA is already compromised... I mean think about it. By the time the engine fails, that oil has been abused, and may have little in common with the original substance placed in the crank case.
 
Messages
1,488
Location
Los Angeles
quote:
Originally posted by tpi: Has anyone had coverage denied because of unspecified viscosity grade usage? I've owned new cars over the last 30 years and had warranty work on two engines. One for a leaking rear main seal, the other for a burned exhaust valve. Neither of these were checked for oil viscosity. Sometimes I use what is specified, sometimes I don't depending on weather and intended use. From my experience if it looks like oil, the engine is clean, and the flow properties are somewhat close to the perception of "oil" I've been OK.
How would anyone know what type of oil you used unless you told them?
 
Messages
12,385
Location
Northern CA
quote:
Originally posted by SSDude: How would anyone know what type of oil you used unless you told them?
UOAs are so common that even some Car companies have heard of them. [LOL!] If you go in for a warranty claim and there is any reason to suspect the wrong oil, a dealer would be remiss to not get a good UOA. Although I doubt that very many do. When I was doing vehicle develpment work 15 years ago, the first thing the engine manufacturer wanted when an engine failed was a UOA. Some of that must have filtered down to the retail level by now.
 
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