trivia about old TVs

Messages
1,048
Location
Sunny Calif
Can you name all the adjustment screws on old televisions? You know, the ones that required a screw driver to turn the dial What was each adjustment called and what did it do?
 
Messages
138
Location
Virginia
Contrast - "warmth - or fade" of image Brightness - brightness of image Color - The strength of the color Tint - changes the tones of the color, adjust to get proper skin tone. Horizontal Hold - to hold screen position side to side Vertical Hold - screen position up and down, prevents screen from flipping over and over.
 
Messages
3,203
Location
Southeastern, PA
Not an adjustment, but I love the way when an old TV was turned off the picture would collapse into a dot on the middle of the screen which would then slowly fade. Wish I could get my computer display to do that when i turn off the computer.
 
Messages
149
Location
chicagoland
Originally Posted By: expat
I remember ours had to 'warm up' for about 30 seconds before you could see a picture.
Ahhh old tube technology. I still have a shortwave radio all tubes, made in 1960. You gotta wait 30 sec to min. before the sound comes on.
 
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Messages
1,724
Location
Glen Ellyn, IL
Originally Posted By: tonycarguy
Can you name all the adjustment screws on old televisions? You know, the ones that required a screw driver to turn the dial
I think most of the old TVs I remember had those adjustments as little knobs behind a trap door, or even out in front. I know that as kids we were forbidden from touching them! The oldest TV I remember had channels 2-13 and "U"; to see any UHF channels we had to set it on "U" and then use a separate tuner that was placed next to the TV to get those channels. When we bought our first color TV (in 1973 - a Philco) it was much more convenient because the knob for the UHF channels was built right into the TV. No more separate tuner! Having a color TV for the first time was a revelation - we'd stare at it like it was a psychedelic acid trip. Amazing!
 
Messages
1,545
Location
Washington State (East)
Reminds me of the mid 60's and watching color TV for the first time on grandpas "round" screen color TV. He spent a few minutes everyday adjusting the various color levels to get it just right. Cartoons on Saturday morning were awesome!
 
Messages
5,466
Location
Buckley, Wa.
While it's easy to make fun at the old televisions, one thing is certain. They sure used to last a whole lot longer than today's plastic and disposable TV's. I recall Magnavox, Curtis Mathis, and RCA's lasting fifteen to twenty years easy.
 
Messages
5,215
Location
Houston, Tx, USA
I still use a tube TV. As a video game collector, having a TV with which I can use my light guns is essential. I don't use it for watching TV except on election night and the superbowl.
 
Messages
4,449
Location
Guilford, CT
Originally Posted By: andrewg
While it's easy to make fun at the old televisions, one thing is certain. They sure used to last a whole lot longer than today's plastic and disposable TV's. I recall Magnavox, Curtis Mathis, and RCA's lasting fifteen to twenty years easy.
All four of my Sony TVs are at least 10 years old, the oldest is 18 years. I almost wish one of them would finally kick the bucket so I have an excuse to get a nice HD flat screen.
 

Al

Messages
19,256
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
Originally Posted By: andrewg
While it's easy to make fun at the old televisions, one thing is certain. They sure used to last a whole lot longer than today's plastic and disposable TV's. I recall Magnavox, Curtis Mathis, and RCA's lasting fifteen to twenty years easy.
I'm not sure about that..TV's before 1980 needed to be repaired every year or two. I personally have had good luck with my last 2 and that's since 1990 Not saying I am right though. I'll try not to argue for a change. smile
 
Messages
5,466
Location
Buckley, Wa.
Originally Posted By: Al
Originally Posted By: andrewg
While it's easy to make fun at the old televisions, one thing is certain. They sure used to last a whole lot longer than today's plastic and disposable TV's. I recall Magnavox, Curtis Mathis, and RCA's lasting fifteen to twenty years easy.
I'm not sure about that..TV's before 1980 needed to be repaired every year or two. I personally have had good luck with my last 2 and that's since 1990 Not saying I am right though. I'll try not to argue for a change. smile
I can only say that when I was a kid (I'm in my late 40's) my parents TV's were all purchased from thrift stores. Most were ten years old from the start. We had TV's (as did some of my friends families) over twenty. All were B/W sets with no remotes. And no, I didn't have a lot of money growing up. One of my current TV's is a $2500 50 inch plasma 1080 HD Philips purchased about 4 years ago. I've had issues with it already. Had another 32" LCD Sony that was less than 5 years and it pooped out. And I have a friend from work that had his 50 inch (three years old) plasma that had to be fixed under warranty.
 
Messages
723
Location
wichita kansas
I can remember as a kid in the 50's Dad taking the back off the TV and taking tubes out and taking them down the street to the grocery store where they had a machine to test them. When you found the bad one you could look in the cabinet for the replacement and go back home. Now a lot of the TV's are basically throwaway ones.
 
Messages
260
Location
indiana, usa
I remember all the static the old ones used to give out when you turned them off. I'd touch the screen, creep up behind my little brother, and........ZAP! I remember reading that they moved all the rarely needed knobs like the vertical and horizontal hold to the back or inside a door, because the average consumer was confused by all the knobs and just made things worse trying to adjust the picture. As for the wood cabinet, some of us just appreciate the look of fine furniture-not everyone wants the inside of their home to look like a spaceship.
 
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