Tolulene as an additive = higher octane fuel.

DJ

Messages
750
Location
New London WI
quote:
Originally posted by wileyE: Used toulene to freshen up questionable fuel in high compression twostrokes. NOT to raise the octane, but to raise the vapor pressure of fuel that had gotten stale. Thanks to illicit drug manufacture the price and puchase of 5 gal jugs of it is cost prohibitve around here. AV gas from the local airport is a better deal.
Sounds like you have an appropriate screen name [Cheers!] . I will have to talk to the boss about this we get 5gallon jugs of tolulene all the time and use it in many of the same ways we do laquer thinner mostly cleaning of paint and contact cement equipment. If it isn't too expensive bought like that I could try loading a high octane program into my car with 87octane and try this. I know it would not be worthwhile over just buying premium but might be a fun experiment. I will have to try the stale gas treatment I used some "brew" and it now runs but maybe this could smooth it out.
 
Messages
926
Location
Ohio
for some reason, a whole gallon of tolulene scares me in a gas tank of a vehicle. Am I saying "it will hurt the fuel system?? nope just something I've never done before but I am very eager to try,,,,,AR
 
Messages
1,967
Location
Kitsap, WA
Ran it a 10:1 fuel/toul with no issues, but it also had premix oil in it. It's pretty volatile stuff, leave the cap loose or off and it'll be gone the next day! That's a lot of vapor so be careful where and how you store it. The place I used to buy it from had pallets of 5 gal cans. Wasn't uncommon to have a new empty jug that wasn't sealed well. Xylene is another one you can play around with if you get it cheaper.
 
Messages
926
Location
Ohio
after doing some research on the net. It seems alot of people only use tolulene in turbo cars or high compression cars that require 92+ octane. My question is can you use tolulene with 87 octane?? or is it even worth it too?? Just looking for a clear answer,,,,,AR P.S My apologies if I'm robbing the thread
 
Messages
5
Location
Pilot Point Texas
well I mixed the following 1 gallon of tolulene one gallon alchol and one gallon used trany fluid and 8 oz Amsoil PI. Added .5 gallons to a full tank 35 gallons.No improvement over regular mpg. Added the remainder(2.5)gallons to full tank 10% improvement. Vehicle is a Chevy Sportside Silverado. 305 vortec 4L60 tranny pulling a 4000 pound jeep on a trailer. 300 mile round trip. [Smile]
 
Messages
1,599
Location
Ohio
quote:
Originally posted by Airborne Ranger: My question is can you use tolulene with 87 octane?? or is it even worth it too?? Just looking for a clear answer,,,
The short answer is yes you can use tolulene with 87 octane. Is it worth it? Depends on why you want to use it, for mileage you may or may not see a slight improvement. If you are running a boosted or high compression engine and are concerned about detonation then it will most likely help in that area, at least it has worked for me in this area before. I now just use Torco race fuel concentrate (octane booster)
 
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3,398
Location
Midwest, Illinois
From the Idaho Corvette Page... FYI, Wusz is an expert in the discussions of fuels. Blend Your Own Race Gas? Not. If you’re a regular reader of the VetteNet mail list or visitor to the techie boards on the Corvette Action Center, you’ve heard of other do-it-yourself additives said to improve gasoline. Unfortunately, a lot of that is urban legend. The executive summary of “DIY race gas” is: mixing it can be dangerous. You sometimes loose performance. You don’t save money. Some of these DIY additives are: aniline, benzene, toluene, xylene and propylene oxide. Forget the first two. Both are highly toxic. Aniline is absorbed through the skin and impairs your blood’s ability to carry oxygen. Handle aniline improperly and you die. Benzene is a carcinogen, so you’ll die after improperly handling it, too–it’ll just take longer. Their toxicity and that they are used in making drugs has aniline and benzene Federally-regulated and not available to the public. The aromatic hydrocarbons (“aromatics”), toluene and xylene are octane improvers. Significant amounts of toluene and lesser amounts of xylene are already in pump and racing gasolines. Both are available from automotive paint suppliers. Both are mildly toxic. Work with them wearing chemical-resistant gloves and in a ventilated area. If there’s any question about ventilation, wear a respirator. In California, law restricts aromatics to 35% of a gasoline blend. Elsewhere it may be as much as 40%. The effect additional toluene or xylene has on pump gas is unpredictable for two reasons: 1) the octane boosting ability of both is less effective on premium pump gases than on regular grade gas because of the aromatics premium gases already contain, 2) toluene and xylene have high octane ratings alone but may have lower octane when blended with other gasoline components and must be carefully tested when mixed with other gasoline components. Toluene and xylene have specific gravities higher than pump gas so the more of them you add, the leaner you need to calibrate the engine’s air/fuel ratio. Once you calibrate for toluene- or xylene-spiked, DIY racing gas; don’t go back to running conventional gasoline until you recalibrate to a richer mixture or you’ll be burning pistons. “Adding more toluene,” Tim Wusz told us, “will increase the octane numbers of the gasoline, but when you get above 45 or 50%, throttle response is poor and the flame speed is reduced to where increasing amounts of fuel are still burning as combustion gases are forced out the exhaust valve. Once that happens, power is lost, not gained.” Image: author. Both have less volatility, so engines burning gasolines laced with high concentrations of them can be more difficult to start when cold. In addition to handling, mixing, calibration, drivability and performance problems associated with DIY race gas, it has a lousy business model, too. A late-model Corvette with a medium-boost, aftermarket supercharger kit at the drag races on a warm day might need 97.2-oct. to keep the engine out of detonation. Toluene, used as a blending component, is 103.5-oct. To make 10-gal. of 97.2-oct., DIY race gas (1:1, 91-oct. unleaded and toluene) costs $42.80. Do it with 91 and 100 unleaded gasolines, you mix 3:7 for $32.05. Because a 1:1 mix of toluene and pump gas costs you performance and throttle response due to slow burn speed; not only is DIY race gas a lot more expensive, but it won’t perform as well, either. The economics of xylene are worse than toluene. Xylene from industrial sources is “mixed-isomer” and has less octane boosting ability than toluene and a higher unit cost. The higher octane, single isomer varieties of xylene, typically obtained through science and laboratory supply businesses, are obscenely expensive, upwards of $100 per gallon. Misunderstanding surrounds propylene oxide. Common uses for it are pesticide and fumigant. While the EPA lists it only as a “probable carcinogen,” ingesting propylene oxide will at least make you sick and can cause coma or death. Use care when handling it. Some racers are under the impression “P.O.” is an octane booster, but it is not. It is an oxygenate that works like nitrous oxide but not as well. “It will improve performance,” Wusz stated, “but the mixture must be richer to take advantage of that. PO is more effective than MTBE but less effective than nitrous. The downsides of PO are: 1) it attacks plastic and rubber parts in fuel systems and 2) its low, 95 deg. F boiling point gives it a tendency to easily escape from a blend leaving the DIY race gas blender with a gasoline which he thought contained a certain amount of PO, but in reality, may have retained far less of it. This makes tuning exceedingly difficult.” Bottom line: brewing your own race gas a foolish move for a lot of reasons. You’re better off buying it ready-made.
 
Messages
341
Location
Upstate, NY
If octane is effectively a measure of how long it takes the fuel to burn, couldn't it be adjusted with the mixing of some diesel fuel? It's cheap.
 
Messages
40,440
Location
Great Lakes
quote:
Originally posted by Airborne Ranger: My question is can you use tolulene with 87 octane?? or is it even worth it too?? Just looking for a clear answer,,,,,AR
You can add toluene to 87 octane gas, but it's pointless IMO. By adding some toluene to 87 octane gas, you'll end up with something like 91-93 octane rating, which is the equivalent of premium grade gas. So why go through the trouble of mixing it yourself if you can easily find such octane-rated gas at the pump? The idea behind using toluene is to increase the octane rating ABOVE what's available at the pump, so you start with the premium gas (91 or 93 octane depending on where you are), and add toluene on top of that to arrive at octane ratings of 100 or thereabout. Of course, select gas stations also sell race gas which is about 100 octane, so you don't even need to mix it with toluene.
 
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43,650
Location
'Stralia
beanoil, toluene is toluene, aka methyl benzene. your link shows "toluene standardisation fuel" as * Toluene 78 %; * Isooctane (2,2,4 trimethyl pentane) as 10 to 17%; and * Normal Heptane as 5 to 10%. They are manufacturing reference fuels. (btw, check the OH&S standard exposure limits for the straight chain versus aromatic hydrocarbons in the link) Toluene is 100% toluene.
 
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