Tires will not stay in balance?

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Water based soap is the preferred lubricant. Sometimes it's a liquid, sometimes it almost looks like vaseline. But if it's advertised as bead lube, it's fine.

Tire shops insist on selling four sensors, because if one battery dies after 7 years, and another 7 years 2 months, etc it's a hassle for everyone involved. They should stock sensors for common cars in case they break one-- sounds like Sams likes "just in time" inventory.
 
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I put 6 oz’s of ceramic balance beads in each tire of my Honda CRV when new and run them until it’s time to change tires again. Tires run perfectly true…no cupping or uneven wear whatsoever. Remove them at tire change and put them in new tires. Work like a champ!
 
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.......

If they used a silicone will it create lasting issue with the rubber/bead mount area? Rims are 17" Painted Alloy from my Hyundai. Never had issues with balancing prior. I'll fight for new tires and have mounted somewhere else if needed. I don't want to have this happen again. Sadly they did my daughters CRV the same day.

Also a concern for me is the emergency braking side of it. If it's slipping while starting out on an Accord, what happens IF ABS is engaged and they still slip? How much longer to stop?
If you read my posts above, I think that thorough cleaning of the tires AND RIMS is needed if silicone is involved. That's based on a limited amount of experience, so take it with a grain of salt.

Also from this limited experience, I don't think the problem goes away without that cleaning.

Good that you are returning to where this took place. Please let us know what they do and say about this.
 
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I had a weird one years ago. Bought a used accord with new uniroyals on it. Drove straight and true until I rotated the tires. Then it was great straight, but in a turn it shook the vehicle and the wheel. Did a couple of rotations until I identified the specific wheel. Had it rebalanced and it still shook. So I jacked the car up so the wheel was off the ground and ran it in gear. To the eye there was slightly over 1/8” variation in roundness at the tread. It was so bad that I marked it with chalk and used a wood planer to shave off the high half of the tire. It actually drove better after that, and then lost all of its air. It was quite interesting to me that whoever did the balance actually accomplished a smooth tire, when on the back, with something that out of round. I mean, my methods were very crude, and yet were an improvement. I’m also not sure of how shaving off 1/8” of brand new tread caused an overnight leak to flat. I replaced them with bridgestones.
 
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I had a weird one years ago. Bought a used accord with new uniroyals on it. Drove straight and true until I rotated the tires. Then it was great straight, but in a turn it shook the vehicle and the wheel. Did a couple of rotations until I identified the specific wheel. Had it rebalanced and it still shook. So I jacked the car up so the wheel was off the ground and ran it in gear. To the eye there was slightly over 1/8” variation in roundness at the tread. It was so bad that I marked it with chalk and used a wood planer to shave off the high half of the tire. It actually drove better after that, and then lost all of its air. It was quite interesting to me that whoever did the balance actually accomplished a smooth tire, when on the back, with something that out of round. I mean, my methods were very crude, and yet were an improvement. I’m also not sure of how shaving off 1/8” of brand new tread caused an overnight leak to flat. I replaced them with bridgestones.
I wonder if you had a separation. If so, then the installer would not have seen that.

Plus, each wheel position has a different level of sensitivity - the general rule is the further from the driver, the less sensitive - meaning LF most sensitive, RR least sensitive.
 
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If you read my posts above, I think that thorough cleaning of the tires AND RIMS is needed if silicone is involved. That's based on a limited amount of experience, so take it with a grain of salt.

Also from this limited experience, I don't think the problem goes away without that cleaning.

Good that you are returning to where this took place. Please let us know what they do and say about this.
Sam's was very accommodating and apologetic. I brought it back and showed them and first thing one of the techs noticed in my pictures was all the white from excess lube that was on tire from when I hit rain. If all true and I do believe them, they had snap-on maintenance service come in and recalibrate machines and show techs some other stuff on them. They retrained on tire mounting and the lubricant issue. They gave me store credit that covered my rebalancing at an outside place.

3 days later I caught a crater size pothole at night going to work. Bent the RF rim, large bubble in side of tire. Sam's dismounted tire so I could get it repaired, ordered a new tire under road hazard warranty. Tire manager did the mount and balance when new tire came in and rim was repaired. No issues with tire slipping after that install under same initial driving conditions. Repaired rim and new Pirelli P7 actually took ZERO weight on balance machine. Accord is smooth and quite on highway.

Obviously hassles but Sams's made good on all the issues.
 

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The Critic

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Update - it has been 2K miles since the tires were rebalanced. The tires are still vibration-free.
 

The Critic

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Update:

The tires have 21K and 8/32" remaining. It has been 11K since the tires were last balanced. I started feeling some light vibrations above 75 mph, so I took it back to the shop for another re-balance.

This is what the shop found:

LF: 1.25 oz off
RF: 0.5 oz off
LR: "OK"
RR: 0.5 oz off

The tires were re-balanced and the vibrations are gone. All RF values were under 20 lbs.

I guess this particular vehicle platform is sensitive to wheel balance.
 
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Is this a top-fuel hemi? NHRA top-fuel cars have their tires screwed to the rims so the tires don't spin on the rim, however, they also have 10,000+ HP. I've never heard of a normal automotive tire spinning on the rim.
My first thought too. Is Critic moonlighting as a street racer at night? I have seen them move on a single screw Peterbilt pulling 80k up hills with 1650 ft lbs of tq. But never a street car or truck.
 
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Update:

The tires have 21K and 8/32" remaining. It has been 11K since the tires were last balanced. I started feeling some light vibrations above 75 mph, so I took it back to the shop for another re-balance.

This is what the shop found:

LF: 1.25 oz off
RF: 0.5 oz off
LR: "OK"
RR: 0.5 oz off

The tires were re-balanced and the vibrations are gone. All RF values were under 20 lbs.

I guess this particular vehicle platform is sensitive to wheel balance.

Not really. A vehicle that has a 1.25 oz out of balance should cause a pretty big vibration. Plus it being on the LF means you are sitting right over it - the most sensitive position. The fact that you had light vibration points to the opposite. Your vehicle is relatively insensitive.

My first thought too. Is Critic moonlighting as a street racer at night? I have seen them move on a single screw Peterbilt pulling 80k up hills with 1650 ft lbs of tq. But never a street car or truck.

I know it's weird, but silicone is very slippery and it doesn't degrade - it's always slippery.
 
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