Thicker is better in my opinion.

Messages
6,894
Location
Wet side WA
Originally Posted by painfx
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
How much thick or heavier from 5w20 to 5w30? I cant imagine you guys would feel a difference. I figure going from 5w to a 10w, is where you would feel a difference.
What do you mean?
How much of a difference would you feel going from 5w20 to a 5w30?
I usually use 5W-30 or 10W-30 in my Corolla but I got some 5W-20 Pennzoil HM after rebate $4 a Jug and that is currently in my Toyota absolute zero difference. I has 1300 plus miles on it and the level on the dipstick has barely budged.
 
Messages
16,602
Location
Upper Midwest
Originally Posted by painfx
I am confused. My friend has a 03 lexus es330. He went from 5w30 to a 10w30 in the summer. He told me the car feels heavier at the throttle. He then switched back to 5w30, he said the engine felt much lighter at throttle. I told him to just stick with 5w30 as 10w is unneccessary for just local driving. Temperatures are under 90F.
Completely imaginary and reflecting a common misunderstanding about what the winter rating means. In fact, for Mobil 1 the 5W-30 is slightly thicker at operating temperature than the 10W-30. [Linked Image]
 
Last edited:
Messages
799
Location
Cali
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
I am confused. My friend has a 03 lexus es330. He went from 5w30 to a 10w30 in the summer. He told me the car feels heavier at the throttle. He then switched back to 5w30, he said the engine felt much lighter at throttle. I told him to just stick with 5w30 as 10w is unneccessary for just local driving. Temperatures are under 90F.
Completely imaginary and reflecting a common misunderstanding about what the winter rating means. In fact, for Mobil 1 the 5W-30 is thicker at operating temperature than the 10W-30.
And yes, he used Mobil 1. 10w-30 felt heavy for him.
 
Messages
799
Location
Cali
When you are talking about thick, are you referring to the data from the Viscosity index or the spec at 40 degree and 100 degree?
 
Messages
799
Location
Cali
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
I am confused. My friend has a 03 lexus es330. He went from 5w30 to a 10w30 in the summer. He told me the car feels heavier at the throttle. He then switched back to 5w30, he said the engine felt much lighter at throttle. I told him to just stick with 5w30 as 10w is unneccessary for just local driving. Temperatures are under 90F.
Completely imaginary and reflecting a common misunderstanding about what the winter rating means. In fact, for Mobil 1 the 5W-30 is slightly thicker at operating temperature than the 10W-30. [Linked Image]
So ideally, you want lower number at 40C and higher number at 100C?
 
Messages
16,602
Location
Upper Midwest
Originally Posted by painfx
When you are talking about thick, are you referring to the data from the Viscosity index or the spec at 40 degree and 100 degree?
The two graphs are nearly on top of each other between those two temperatures.
 
Messages
16,486
Location
...
Originally Posted by buster
Saying "thicker" is better is like saying Large Size gloves are better for everyone. It's an irrational argument.
Comment of the day.
 
Messages
16,602
Location
Upper Midwest
Originally Posted by painfx
So ideally, you want lower number at 40C and higher number at 100C?
Ideally you want a grade that meets the requirements for your engine at operating temperature and is then appropriate for your expected starting conditions. If you are above freezing then any winter rating will be appropriate.
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Messages
45,355
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
So ideally, you want lower number at 40C and higher number at 100C?
Ideally you want a grade that meets the requirements for your engine at operating temperature and is then appropriate for your expected starting conditions. If you are above freezing then any winter rating will be appropriate.
This.
 
Messages
1,776
Location
Kingston
Originally Posted by painfx
Originally Posted by caprice_2nv
The 5 vs 10w will only be noticeable when the engine is cold. Once warmed up you won't feel a difference because they are the same grade at temperature. A 5w20 vs a 5w30 or 5w40 you could potentially feel a difference when warm but probably not when cold.
I am confused. My friend has a 03 lexus es330. He went from 5w30 to a 10w30 in the summer. He told me the car feels heavier at the throttle. He then switched back to 5w30, he said the engine felt much lighter at throttle. I told him to just stick with 5w30 as 10w is unneccessary for just local driving. Temperatures are under 90F.
There are 0w30s that are actually thicker at temperature (old German Castrol was this way - almost a 40 weight) than a 10w30 or a 5w30. So it likely has nothing to do with the 5 vs the 10, but more likely that the particular 10w30 he used happened to be a thicker oil than the 5w30 (closer to a 40 weight and the 5w30 could have been closer to a 20 weight). I could be using incorrect wording but this is the way I understand it. Different oils can be thicker or thinner even in the same grade.
 
Last edited:
Messages
1,776
Location
Kingston
Originally Posted by painfx
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
I am confused. My friend has a 03 lexus es330. He went from 5w30 to a 10w30 in the summer. He told me the car feels heavier at the throttle. He then switched back to 5w30, he said the engine felt much lighter at throttle. I told him to just stick with 5w30 as 10w is unneccessary for just local driving. Temperatures are under 90F.
Completely imaginary and reflecting a common misunderstanding about what the winter rating means. In fact, for Mobil 1 the 5W-30 is thicker at operating temperature than the 10W-30.
And yes, he used Mobil 1. 10w-30 felt heavy for him.
And which of the many Mobil 1 oils is the next question. They are all different.
 
Messages
6,404
Location
New Braunfels
Absolutely correct. SAE grades are vague...HTHS is actually helpful for operating temperature. Cold rating is simply cold rating and Woodul be better rated as a minimum start temp.
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
So ideally, you want lower number at 40C and higher number at 100C?
Ideally you want a grade that meets the requirements for your engine at operating temperature and is then appropriate for your expected starting conditions. If you are above freezing then any winter rating will be appropriate.
 
Last edited:
Messages
799
Location
Cali
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
So ideally, you want lower number at 40C and higher number at 100C?
Ideally you want a grade that meets the requirements for your engine at operating temperature and is then appropriate for your expected starting conditions. If you are above freezing then any winter rating will be appropriate.
That is not fun anymore right? This website wouldnt be needed if it is not about comparing oil types and brands... smile
 
Messages
16,602
Location
Upper Midwest
Originally Posted by painfx
That is not fun anymore right? This website wouldnt be needed if it is not about comparing oil types and brands... smile
If you mean it isn't endlessly posting answers to endless questions then you are correct.
 
Messages
16,486
Location
...
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
That is not fun anymore right? This website wouldnt be needed if it is not about comparing oil types and brands... smile
If you mean it isn't endlessly posting answers to endless questions then you are correct.
🎯
 
Messages
799
Location
Cali
Originally Posted by caprice_2nv
Originally Posted by painfx
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by painfx
I am confused. My friend has a 03 lexus es330. He went from 5w30 to a 10w30 in the summer. He told me the car feels heavier at the throttle. He then switched back to 5w30, he said the engine felt much lighter at throttle. I told him to just stick with 5w30 as 10w is unneccessary for just local driving. Temperatures are under 90F.
Completely imaginary and reflecting a common misunderstanding about what the winter rating means. In fact, for Mobil 1 the 5W-30 is thicker at operating temperature than the 10W-30.
And yes, he used Mobil 1. 10w-30 felt heavy for him.
And which of the many Mobil 1 oils is the next question. They are all different.
The regular Mobil 1 (vanila)
 
Messages
3,035
Location
GA.
*According to graphs I have seen - the cross over point between a 20W and 30W oil occurs at approx. 18 to 23 degrees F. for start up speed / protection. Below say 18 degrees F and the start up protection speed of the 20W begins to show it's advantage .
Originally Posted by kschachn
Originally Posted by caprice_2nv
The 5 vs 10w will only be noticeable when the engine is cold. Once warmed up you won't feel a difference because they are the same grade at temperature.
And only around 0F or below.
 
Messages
711
Location
Alaska and Wisconsin
Originally Posted by Navi
I dont know about those engineers. Ive had plenty of problems before 100k miles. I think the engineers balance different interests. Toyota engineers seem concerned about reliability and mpg but I dont know about other engineers...
That's the same across the automotive industry. Take NASCAR for example. If the aerodynamics team had their way, there would be zero flow into the engine compartment and the engine would overheat very quickly. If the engine team had their way, there would be maximum air flow into the engine compartment and the car would be slow as balls (comparatively). They have to find a compromise. The OEMs are no different in this regard except unlike NASCAR where you have a known condition the engine will be in throughout its lifetime, the OEM has to compromise across the entire spectrum from one extreme to the other. They have no idea if the engine will spend its days gently gliding down the highway of the central plains, sitting in Miami traffic in 100*F heat and 90% humidity, dealing with the hot and sandy conditions of the desert, or trying to start and short trip in -40*F temps in the mountains of Alaska. Every scenario has to be accounted for. That's just in the engineering department. Throw in the marketing department wanting a global platform that is pleasing to the eye to sell it, and you get A LOT of compromises with a lot of room for error. The fact that widespread failures aren't more commonplace than they are is rather astounding.
FYI -- driving through Alaska's mountains are usually some of the warmer spots; it's the low valleys and and low spots that often get deathly cold.

Working on Alaska's "North Slope" in years gone by, I had to drive between Alyeska Pipeline's pump stations when it was -55 to -65 degs F ... had have to drive in a caravan of vehicles in case one or two broke down. The cabs in those trucks never warmed above zero degrees in those temps. Same with the engines...

I remember it taking dozens of revolutions for the parked truck tires' flat spots to work their way to "round" again. Those were the days twenty-one to twenty-four years ago!

Let's see... it was -45 degs F in the Prudhoe Bay area just last last week. Very few vehicles move when it's that cold; slope operators only allow essential operations to take place when it's that cold.

It's warmed up some today... it's -7. That's a balmy heat wave compared to -45 degs F and colder -- practically swimsuit weather. I see it'll be -30 degs F and colder again later this week...
 
Last edited:
Top