The Worst Automotive Fads To Hit The Streets

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Oct 8, 2006
Messages
10,395
Location
OH
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by atikovi
As you wish but why even bother washing it then if you don't care how it looks?
?????? This isn't complex. I care how the VEHICLE looks; the paint. I wash the wheels and keep the vehicle reasonably clean because I like it to look good. I won't put anything on the rubber of the tires because their function is more important than their form and putting greasy shiny garbage on them not only lacks appeal to me but if anything, may negatively impact their performance and lifespan. The paint is supposed to be shiny, that's why it comes that way, the tires? Not so much.
There are plenty of tire dressings available that leave a nice matte finish when applied. No shine, or greasy look, just looks like a new, clean tire. To me, it looks like the detailing job was done half a$$ if the tires are left dirty, or untreated...
 
Last edited:

atikovi

Thread starter
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
8,875
Location
Suburban Washington DC
Originally Posted by grampi
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by atikovi
As you wish but why even bother washing it then if you don't care how it looks?
?????? This isn't complex. I care how the VEHICLE looks; the paint. I wash the wheels and keep the vehicle reasonably clean because I like it to look good. I won't put anything on the rubber of the tires because their function is more important than their form and putting greasy shiny garbage on them not only lacks appeal to me but if anything, may negatively impact their performance and lifespan. The paint is supposed to be shiny, that's why it comes that way, the tires? Not so much.
There are plenty of tire dressings available that leave a nice matte finish when applied. No shine, or greasy look, just looks like a new, clean tire. To me, it looks like the detailing job was done half a$$ if the tires are left dirty, or untreated...
^This.
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by atikovi
Originally Posted by grampi
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by atikovi
As you wish but why even bother washing it then if you don't care how it looks?
?????? This isn't complex. I care how the VEHICLE looks; the paint. I wash the wheels and keep the vehicle reasonably clean because I like it to look good. I won't put anything on the rubber of the tires because their function is more important than their form and putting greasy shiny garbage on them not only lacks appeal to me but if anything, may negatively impact their performance and lifespan. The paint is supposed to be shiny, that's why it comes that way, the tires? Not so much.
There are plenty of tire dressings available that leave a nice matte finish when applied. No shine, or greasy look, just looks like a new, clean tire. To me, it looks like the detailing job was done half a$$ if the tires are left dirty, or untreated...
^This.
Perhaps you two should get a room?
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2006
Messages
10,395
Location
OH
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
I care how the VEHICLE looks; the paint. I wash the wheels and keep the vehicle reasonably clean because I like it to look good. I won't put anything on the rubber of the tires because their function is more important than their form and putting greasy shiny garbage on them not only lacks appeal to me but if anything, may negatively impact their performance and lifespan. The paint is supposed to be shiny, that's why it comes that way, the tires? Not so much.
There are plenty of tire dressings available that leave a nice matte finish when applied. No shine, or greasy look, just looks like a new, clean tire. To me, it looks like the detailing job was done half a$$ if the tires are left dirty, or untreated...[/quote] ^This.[/quote] Perhaps you two should get a room? [/quote] That's a childish way to lose an argument...
 
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
Messages
25,946
Location
Dallas,Tx USA
I've seen too many tire dressings,especially armor all type products cause cracks and dry rot on the sidewalls. I use a shot of spray wax on mine. Gives them a deep conditioned look without leaving them sticky.
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by grampi
There are plenty of tire dressings available that leave a nice matte finish when applied. No shine, or greasy look, just looks like a new, clean tire. To me, it looks like the detailing job was done half a$$ if the tires are left dirty, or untreated...
The tires on my Jeep ARE new, they were installed in my driveway on April 7th as per my Summer Tire thread. They are quite literally factory new tires, the Jeep was never driven on them beyond off the car hauler in December. They were wiped off with microfibre cloth when the vehicle was washed and I was cleaning the wheels and they MIGHT have picked up a bit of dust when driven to where I took the photo, but they are in the strictest sense of the phrase a "new, clean tire". If your impression is that they should be "blacker" and need to be "treated" then your expectation is not that of a new clean tire, but some idealized fantasy you've conjured up of what a new tire looks like. These were my Pilot Super Sports for my M5 when they showed up: [Linked Image] And these were the Blizzak's I purchased to run in the winter: [Linked Image] Note they aren't shiny, or in any way resemble a "dressed" tire. The sidewalls have that greyish chalky colour to them. I expect the appearance you are envisioning as "new" is once the dealer or tire shop has given them a bit of a "treatment" like they did with my wife's tires on her Charger: [Linked Image] In comparison, even quite freshly clean, the PSS's on my M5 still were nowhere near as black: [Linked Image] And as the dressing the dealer installed started to fade away, the tires on my Charger SRT-8 began to look similar: [Linked Image]
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by grampi
That's a childish way to lose an argument...
Who is losing an argument? There is no "argument" occurring here, we have two diametrically opposed opinions on appearance, nothing more. There is no position of victory to be had.
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by aquariuscsm
I've seen too many tire dressings,especially armor all type products cause cracks and dry rot on the sidewalls. I use a shot of spray wax on mine. Gives them a deep conditioned look without leaving them sticky.
Yup, Capriracer has spoken about this in the past. Tires are impregnated with a compound that blocks UV that during use works its way out of the rubber and coats the sidewalls to protect them from damage. That is what gives them that grey-ish look. A dressing can block this from happening but can also cause damage by itself. And of course if it migrates to the traction surface, it can have an impact on performance, however slight that may be.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2006
Messages
10,395
Location
OH
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by grampi
That's a childish way to lose an argument...
Who is losing an argument? There is no "argument" occurring here, we have two diametrically opposed opinions on appearance, nothing more. There is no position of victory to be had.
Argument or no argument, it was a childish statement...
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2006
Messages
10,395
Location
OH
I have never had to replace a set of tires due to the sidewalls being deteriorated because tire dressing was applied to them and somehow broke down the natural UV protectors of the tire. And other than not having a grey, chalky look, you'd never be able to tell my tires have dressing on them when I'm done applying it. My tires just look like clean, natural rubber when I'm done applying dressing...they have no greasy or oily look at all...
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by grampi
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by grampi
That's a childish way to lose an argument...
Who is losing an argument? There is no "argument" occurring here, we have two diametrically opposed opinions on appearance, nothing more. There is no position of victory to be had.
Argument or no argument, it was a childish statement...
Right, because continuing to beat this dead horse wasn't childish in and of itself right? smirk Obviously immersed in your echo chamber, the pair of you, and thoroughly enthralled in the feedback it afforded, I thought it an appropriate quip. The continued celebration of your mutual enjoyment of all things shiny while we had gone well past the acknowledgement of your (collective) position on the matter was certainly not for my benefit or anybody else on this board.
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by grampi
I have never had to replace a set of tires due to the sidewalls being deteriorated because tire dressing was applied to them and somehow broke down the natural UV protectors of the tire. And other than not having a grey, chalky look, you'd never be able to tell my tires have dressing on them when I'm done applying it. My tires just look like clean, natural rubber when I'm done applying dressing...they have no greasy or oily look at all...
And that's your personal anecdote, which is fine, however most of the major tire companies do NOT recommend you do anything other than wash the tires. Michelin says use soap and water, that's it: https://www.consumerreports.org/tires/how-to-keep-your-tires-looking-good/
Originally Posted by Consumer Reports
We have not tested any of these products, but we did ask for feedback from Bridgestone, Continental, and Michelin. The clear consensus was that today's car tires are formulated to resist the harmful effects of UV light and ozone. Continental did not recommend use of lubricants or chemicals to the tire, and Michelin said tires should be cleaned with soap and water. Bridgestone said their tires have antioxidants and waxes in the tire to protect them from the environment. A dull appearance may occur overtime, but this is just the waxes migrating to the surface and actually helps protect the tire.
Of course I think we've all witnessed a bit of double-speak on some of this stuff, like manufacturers saying not to use additives and then selling additives and in this case, I believe Michelin has, or still does, market a tire clean/shine product. But my position on the matter has been to follow the collective advice of the OEM's which is to just wash them off, which results in them looking as you see them, with that grey-ish appearance. I don't want to risk impacting their performance or lifespan by putting something on them.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2006
Messages
10,395
Location
OH
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by grampi
I have never had to replace a set of tires due to the sidewalls being deteriorated because tire dressing was applied to them and somehow broke down the natural UV protectors of the tire. And other than not having a grey, chalky look, you'd never be able to tell my tires have dressing on them when I'm done applying it. My tires just look like clean, natural rubber when I'm done applying dressing...they have no greasy or oily look at all...
And that's your personal anecdote, which is fine, however most of the major tire companies do NOT recommend you do anything other than wash the tires. Michelin says use soap and water, that's it: https://www.consumerreports.org/tires/how-to-keep-your-tires-looking-good/
Originally Posted by Consumer Reports
We have not tested any of these products, but we did ask for feedback from Bridgestone, Continental, and Michelin. The clear consensus was that today's car tires are formulated to resist the harmful effects of UV light and ozone. Continental did not recommend use of lubricants or chemicals to the tire, and Michelin said tires should be cleaned with soap and water. Bridgestone said their tires have antioxidants and waxes in the tire to protect them from the environment. A dull appearance may occur overtime, but this is just the waxes migrating to the surface and actually helps protect the tire.
Of course I think we've all witnessed a bit of double-speak on some of this stuff, like manufacturers saying not to use additives and then selling additives and in this case, I believe Michelin has, or still does, market a tire clean/shine product. But my position on the matter has been to follow the collective advice of the OEM's which is to just wash them off, which results in them looking as you see them, with that grey-ish appearance. I don't want to risk impacting their performance or lifespan by putting something on them.
Applying tire dressings isn't going to reduce their lifespan or their performance...
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2006
Messages
10,395
Location
OH
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by grampi
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by grampi
That's a childish way to lose an argument...
Who is losing an argument? There is no "argument" occurring here, we have two diametrically opposed opinions on appearance, nothing more. There is no position of victory to be had.
Argument or no argument, it was a childish statement...
Right, because continuing to beat this dead horse wasn't childish in and of itself right? smirk Obviously immersed in your echo chamber, the pair of you, and thoroughly enthralled in the feedback it afforded, I thought it an appropriate quip. The continued celebration of your mutual enjoyment of all things shiny while we had gone well past the acknowledgement of your (collective) position on the matter was certainly not for my benefit or anybody else on this board.
All things shiney? Proof you can't read or comprehend...
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by grampi
Applying tire dressings isn't going to reduce their lifespan or their performance...
There is the potential for a dressing to dry out the sidewalls as well as prevent the UV protectants from migrating to the surface and therefore impact the lifespan of the tire. Impact on performance would only be if it migrated to the traction surface. None of the tire OEM's endorse its use and that's good enough for me. Same reason I don't use Lucas, MMO or anything in my oil, I don't want to defile a fully formulated product with some aftermarket miracle product that hasn't been subject to any of the extensive long-term testing required by the majors.
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by grampi
All things shiney? Proof you can't read or comprehend...
HA! speaking of comprehension, I guess hyperbole's a bit beyond your mental capacity eh? I'll put what's between my ears against yours any day of the week. Boy, this is headed downhill fast! LOL
 

atikovi

Thread starter
Joined
Apr 27, 2010
Messages
8,875
Location
Suburban Washington DC
IBTL
Originally Posted by OVERKILL
Originally Posted by Consumer Reports
We have not tested any of these products, but we did ask for feedback from Bridgestone, Continental, and Michelin. The clear consensus was that today's car tires are formulated to resist the harmful effects of UV light and ozone. Continental did not recommend use of lubricants or chemicals to the tire, and Michelin said tires should be cleaned with soap and water. Bridgestone said their tires have antioxidants and waxes in the tire to protect them from the environment. A dull appearance may occur overtime, but this is just the waxes migrating to the surface and actually helps protect the tire.
But of course the tire companies don't want you to add any protectant that would resist the harmful effects of UV light and ozone. They would rather have the sidewall deteriorate so you have to buy new tires even if they have plenty of tread. Every six years they are suggesting. Wonder how the tires on this car I bought in 1992 and sold in 2017 with the same tires, lasted so long. Couldn't have been the dressing... [Linked Image from fototime.com]
 

OVERKILL

$100 Site Donor 2021
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Messages
48,060
Location
Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted by atikovi
But of course the tire companies don't want you to add any protectant that would resist the harmful effects of UV light and ozone.
Ahhh, here we go, it's a conspiracy by the tire OEM's to sell more tires rather than trying to cover their rears from premature failures caused by people "dressing" their tires with poorly or completely untested chemicals manufactured by third parties who in no way benefit from your tires lasting longer.
Originally Posted by atikovi
They would rather have the sidewall deteriorate so you have to buy new tires even if they have plenty of tread. Every six years they are suggesting. Wonder how the tires on this car I bought in 1992 and sold in 2017 with the same tires, lasted so long. Couldn't have been the dressing...
It could have been, but it probably wasn't. We've had trailer tires still look great after a similar duration, never treated with anything, simply by keeping them out of the sun. Do you believe Lucas "Oil Stabilizer" provides magical benefits too because Mercedes and Mobil want your engine to fail?
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top