The myth of condensation in fuel tanks...

Messages
47,534
Location
Duvall WA - Pacific NW USA
Yes and he says what I say as well.
 Quote:
Yes or .81oz EVERY DAY THE CONDITIONS ARE RIGHT FOR CONDENSATION!!!!!!!! Someone remind him there are 365 days per year and tanks in boats should be expected to last well into the 30 year mark..?? Even if your tank could only hold .01 oz of water vapor over time it ADDS UP!!!!!
 
Messages
6,388
Location
Washington St.
He's missing a huge point. Diesel fuel holds some water in suspension. It always does. This is not contaminated fuel, it is the nature of diesel fuel. This water is usually not caught by water removal filters and goes into the combustion chamber with no problems...it might actually help combustion by the water droplets flashing into steam and causing the fuel droplets to atomize better. But...when temperatures drop the fuel cannot hold as much water in suspension, so some drops out. This water will accumulate in the bottom of the tank. Expect to see this every Fall in every diesel fuel tank. Sometimes the fuel is used, agitated, refueled, and the quantity isn't noticeable.
 
Messages
3,463
Location
Coastal South Carolina
"As the marina pumps its tanks nearly dry before the next fuel delivery, those who buy fuel from the near empty tank are the ones that are going to get the water (because it's pumped from the bottom of the tank)." ???Seems oil floats on water and the gas since its lighter floats on the water?????? so the water will be at the bottom of the tank and pumped off first?
 

Kestas

Staff member
Messages
13,820
Location
The Motor City
I agree with Pablo. These are all static calculations, and they don't account for thermal cycling, which can 'pump' moisture into the tank. Moisture contamination is a cumulative phenomenon. The author mentioned diesel, but didn't exclude gasoline. He ignored the phenomenon of phase separation with E10. This has been discussed in detail in the recent past on this board. "The weather can turn cold very fast, but does not suddenly get very warm." Apparently he's never lived in Michigan, where the weather can quickly turn warm and balmy in the winter, causing everything in my garage to sweat like morning dew and rust. His temperature conversion needs to be edited.
 
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