The Army’s Impact on the Fuel and Lubricant Ind.

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http://www.alu.army.mil/alog/issues/MarApr09/fuel_lubricant.html An excerpt... by Maurice E. Le Pera The author takes a historical look at the Army’s fuel and lubricant program and its effect on commercial lubricants. 'Synthetic-based engine oils were introduced in 1967 for all Army vehicles and equipment operating in Alaska using the Aberdeen Proving Ground Purchased Description Number 1 that later was converted into MIL–L–46167, commonly referred to as Arctic Engine Oil (OEA). This engine oil was essentially SAE 0W–20, which was quickly adopted by commercial operators building the Alaska pipeline system during the 1970s. Because of the successful performance of OEA in a variety of engine and powertrain systems, the Army subsequently field-tested this oil at several locations in Army tactical and combat vehicles and equipment to assess its applicability in moderate-to-hot temperatures. These tests were conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado; Fort Lewis, Washington; and Fort Bliss, Texas. In each case, OEA performance was satisfactory and no adverse effects were observed even while operating in the high-temperature environments. Although the Army did not pursue a fleet-wide conversion at that time, the successful performance of OEA both in different engine and powertrain systems and in various operating environments demonstrated its feasibility. This success attracted many commercial fleet operators to consider, and later adopt, synthetic-based engine oils.'
 
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Originally Posted By: NHGUY
Back when synthetics were synthetic and not the current Group III labeling "confusion".
Bonus points! what base oil was it?
 
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Originally Posted By: Rand
Originally Posted By: NHGUY
Back when synthetics were synthetic and not the current Group III labeling "confusion".
Bonus points! what base oil was it?
The earliest cold-wether synthetics were ester-based oils primarily, with PAO's coming along a bit later. The 1976 Popular Science article on synthetics has a good overview of who was making what at that time period.
 
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Now the Army is trying for a one oil standard, 15w-40 in engines AND transmissions. The FMTV family uses the same oil in the engines as the transmissions.....crazy, but it works, and it saves a step in logistics for sure.
 

wemay

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Originally Posted By: 95busa
Now the Army is trying for a one oil standard, 15w-40 in engines AND transmissions. The FMTV family uses the same oil in the engines as the transmissions.....crazy, but it works, and it saves a step in logistics for sure.
That is very interesting.
 
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As I recall, the original arctic engine oils under this specification were Polar Start (based on alkylated benzene) and Frigid Go (based on diesters). These oils were 5W-30; while 0W did not exist at the time, if it did these oils would have been around the border of 0W and 5W. Tom NJ
 
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Originally Posted By: Tom NJ
As I recall, the original arctic engine oils under this specification were Polar Start (based on alkylated benzene) and Frigid Go (based on diesters). These oils were 5W-30; while 0W did not exist at the time, if it did these oils would have been around the border of 0W and 5W. Tom NJ
Yep. I remember using Polar Start while stationed at Clear AFS, AK in 1975/1976. Regardless, when the temperatures got down to 40 below you had to keep your vehicles plugged in at all times or they would never start. My F100 had 2-750 watt engine heaters, 1 800 watt interior warmer (to keep the vinyl seats from shattering into splinters)and a 100 watt battery blanket.
 
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I found it a little curious, that they approved oils in the 60's based on testing in Colorado, Texas, and Washington. Hardly even close to Alaska interior Arctic conditions. Doubt that daytime high temps (no windchill factor) reach -50F in those places like they do regularly in the interior. Wonder why they couldn't test the stuff where it was going to be used. I worked at the Cold Regions Test Center at Ft. Greely, AK and I never even heard of the testing at the other places for the oil we were using. But then the powers that be who decide these things reside in cubicles where the only thing cold is the brush off they got from an advance they made on Mary Jo Rottencrotch.
 
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I work around turbine engines in aircraft and have ample access to the high grade MIL-PRF-23699 turbine engine oil. I'd be curious to see what a VOA of it from Blackstone would look like, I just don't care to pay for it.
 
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Originally Posted By: Lethal1ty17
I work around turbine engines in aircraft and have ample access to the high grade MIL-PRF-23699 turbine engine oil. I'd be curious to see what a VOA of it from Blackstone would look like, I just don't care to pay for it.
It would show no metals at all. The oil consists of a polyol ester, ashless anti-oxidants, tricresyl phosphate, and some ashless corrosion inhibitors. The viscosity is 5.1 cSt @ 100°C, the pour point is -57°C, and the flash point is 260°C. It should show no TBN, and the Noack volatility is about 5%. Tom NJ
 
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Originally Posted By: Pajero
The Germans created synthetic oil in WW2....Nothing like modern German engineering!
Found an interesting historical article in a web search. Not sure the Germans get to take all the credit. Excerpted this section..... One bi-product of this process has been the development of synthetic motor oil. It is believed that the first synthesized hydrocarbons were created by Friedel & Crafts in 1877 using Aluminum TriChrloride as the catalyst. Yet it wasn't until 1929 that the commercial development of synthesized hydrocarbons was undertaken by Standard Oil of Indiana. Not surprisingly there was a lack of demand for the new product and this first marketplace introduction of synthetic lubricants was commercially unsuccessful. (There is probably no relationship between this event and collapse of stock market later that year.) Eight years later the first PAO, a synthetic product using olefin polymerization, was manufactured. 1937 was also year that the Zurich Aviation Congress became interested in ester based lubricant technology. From 1938 to 1944 thousands of esters were evaluated in Germany with excellent results. In our own country ester basestocks were also being developed by the United States Naval Research Laboratory and introduced into military aviation applications during the 1940's. And found this article originally published in January 2000 Lubricants World Magazine http://www.melepera.com/documents/Synthetic%20Automotive%20Engine%20Oils-A%20Brief%20History.pdf
 
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Originally Posted By: TiredTrucker
I found it a little curious, that they approved oils in the 60's based on testing in Colorado, Texas, and Washington. Hardly even close to Alaska interior Arctic conditions.
In the quoted text, the word "subsequently" seperates the initial Arctic testing from the later lower 48 testing. Try reading it again, no rottencrotch required.
 
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Originally Posted By: 95busa
Now the Army is trying for a one oil standard, 15w-40 in engines AND transmissions. The FMTV family uses the same oil in the engines as the transmissions.....crazy, but it works, and it saves a step in logistics for sure.
If this is true, what brand are they using? Shell Rotella? Delo? Mobil Delvac? Something else? ~ Triton
 
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