Test driving PHEV w no battery charge

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RichardS

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Onetor - the Hyundai dealership here is also the Mitsubishi dealership. When I scooped out the ioniq, the sales person mentioned the Outlander, but also told me the sticker on it was almost $40k, which he already knew was past what I wanted to pay. Wyr - I'll be 32 next month. I do t want to have to worry about car shopping again until I'm 40, and get myself a midlife crisis convertible. 14accent - I honestly probably wouldn't have bought it on the spot even if they had charged it. The PHEVs they had were all base model, so lacked the leather seats I wanted, and the dealership wanted $1,000 to upholster them aftermarket. But I was comfortable with ordering one. ems1 - I just couldn't get past the cartoonish, marshmallow car feel of the interior. I like the exterior. We replaced the caliber 2 weeks ago with a Genlll. And I love the cockpit of that car. The issues you felt with the DCT, I didn't notice in the Ioniq, but seem to be common. Some have said it seems like the computer isn't sure what to do with the 2 inputs, and sort of panics until it figures it out. SubieRubyroo - awwww! I don't mind the exterior, especially since I won't ever have to really look at it. But I don't like the shiny, plasticy, masrshmallow car feel of the interior. I don't need every surface wrapped in leather (or leatherette in the Prius), but I would like it to at least look like some effort went into it.
 

RichardS

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madRiver - I'm not really sure the thought behind not having them charged. Perhaps they honestly believe it drives exactly the same, just on electric? I can't imagine something drives the same with 139 HP cranking out (hybrid mode) when it's only got 60hp (electric motor alone)
 
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Unreasonable for you to expect a vehicle on a lot to be ready to go as the maker intended? No. It's also not good for the battery pack to be left in a low charge state for any length of time. There is a sticker under the hood of my Accord Hybrid stating that the car must be driven at least thirty miles every ninety days to avoid possible damage to the battery pack. Locally, the Ioniq was readily available for a few grand less than the Accord Hybrid I ended up buying but a quick search for reviews of the driving behavior of the powertrain ruled it out. Why Hyundai decided to use such a clunky transmission in these is beyond me. The Sonata is available as a fake hybrid, and I use that adjective since fuel economy is uninspiring.
 

blupupher

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I had the same issue with a Hybrid Pacifica I test drove. Battery was at 0%. Sales guy said they do not have a charging station yet, so once it died, that was it. The Honda dealer next door has a Level 2 charging station, maybe they should go borrow it? I was very disappointed in the test drive since I have no idea how it drives in all electric.
 
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Complain to corporate Kia about your disappointment. May go as far as this forum or possibly the manufacturer rep may educate those bozos in selling product they built properly.
 
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4WD

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"EV function will be overridden by the engine if you accelerate even moderately aggressive" Our Fusion Hybrid does this ... don't think it's because the EV side can't do it ... just the computer is more conservative about using up the battery life and the engine will help that cause when the logic tells it to do so ... (since it is not a plug in that will be given a charge later on ...)
 

RichardS

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Blupupher - or even just an extension cord! It's a 9 hour charge from 0 at 120v. madRiver - I've thought about it, but I don't think I want to try that hard to sell myself that car. 4WD - right, I think that's pretty typical of any HEV. The computer is going to select the most efficient form of operation based on driver input. But the Niro and Ioniq both come with a plug-in model that is supposed to give you 26 or more miles of pure electric driving. But if I can't accelerate at anything more than a slight clip, then it sounds like a several thousand dollar waste of money. So far as I've seen, I haven't seen any information with the caveat of "EV mode only functions when traveling at a set speed, or under light acceleration only" like the silly EV button in the non plug-in Prius.
 
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RichardS, My Prius Prime has only once started the engine while there was battery remaining. That happened when the weather was below 10F. I spend half the year near Tampa. In the warm weather the engine never starts until the battery is exhausted. I usually get 35 miles on electric in Fl. The posts about the engine starting under heavier acceleration don't apply to the Prime. Maybe it happens with the Kia or Hyundai, can't say.
 

RichardS

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ems1 - I didn't mean to seem like I was suggesting the Prime would override EV under hard acceleration. Genlll without a plug, and with an EV mode, will only stay in electric mode under light acceleration, and under 12mph. But those are solely charged via the ICE. It seems the Kia and Hyundai will override the EV to engage the motor for certain acceleration inputs, but the few reviews I read differed on where the ICE would engage. One said it was at 20% pedal movement, and one described it as needing a "real kick on the pedal".
 
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Originally Posted by 4WD
"EV function will be overridden by the engine if you accelerate even moderately aggressive" Our Fusion Hybrid does this ... don't think it's because the EV side can't do it ... just the computer is more conservative about using up the battery life and the engine will help that cause when the logic tells it to do so ... (since it is not a plug in that will be given a charge later on ...)
That's a hybrid not a plug-in hybrid. With my Ford C-MAX Plug-In hybrid I have to really mash down on the peddle to get the gas engine to activate and override the EV only setting. The hybrid only model has a lot less power available and relies on the engine for performance. Regarding the original topic. I had scheduled a test drive of the C-MAX and was surprised to find it uncharged when I arrived at the Ford EV Certified dealership. I had driven a friends C-MAX plug-in for a week on a road trip so I had already had the test drive I had wanted so even though I was annoyed as they have a Level 2 charger in the service bay I let it go. I did make sure to comment to the sales rep that I wanted to make sure the car was fully charged when I took delivery of the car the next morning, and it was. I recently took the car in for it's one year service and the Quick Lane rep was a little taken aback when I asked for the car to be charged while waiting for service. They did bring it around to the service bay and charge it while we were waiting for the Quick Lane service so all was fine in the end. If you can't get the full price of tax credit consider leasing the car. I did and they add the tax credit into the cash off offer. In my case it bumped the cash off offer to just over $9.000 off the MSRP. At the end of the lease you already have the option of buying the car. In my case if I buy it at the presaged upon price I will be out $19,930 on a $27,000 car. ($7,800 + $11,500 + $630 in tax). That dealership tank of gas lasted all last winter, 1622 miles until early spring. It's still using the tank from late May at over 3,500 miles so far.
 
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