Tell me why I shouldn't use a straight weight oil.

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22,677
Location
Apple Valley, California
You guys seem to really like the multi-vis oils. The truth is that with 10w-30,10w-40,15w-40 and 20w-50 my truck rattles when I start it(392 I.H.C. v8). Doesn't rattle with Sae 30, holds good oil pressure and uses less oil. So whats wrong/bad with straight weights? I live in the desert so extreem cold is not an issue......I saw snow once....On tv [Big Grin] It does get 120 degrees in the summer though.
 

KW

Messages
1,686
Location
Central Arkansas
Looks like you are in the right environment for a straight weight oil. It my understanding that they are more stable than the multi vis oils anyway.
 

Chris142

Thread starter
Messages
22,677
Location
Apple Valley, California
quote:
Originally posted by Spector: Getting harder to find the single weights though
Not around here. I bought 5 cases of Havoline/Chevron 30w last week. [Roll Eyes] I looked for a VOA on this stuff and didn't see any. I'm curious to how much Molt n-stuff it has.
 
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4,844
Location
Saskatchewan
I think my owner's manual says it's OK for +4C and up for my car. My guess is that it doesn't rattle (probably piston slap?) because the oil is so thick at startup that it dampens the slap. It'll be a little harder on gas until the engine is warmed up, but that's about the only drawback. SAE 30 is very stable at high temps. [ October 27, 2003, 11:16 PM: Message edited by: rpn453 ]
 
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3,593
Location
Outside smalltown, IL
Gallons of 30wt Rotella are available everywhere around here. I'm sure it must be farmers using it in varied equipment since it gets pretty cold here in the winter. I was thinking about getting some for my mower and generator...
 
Messages
453
Location
Galveston, TX
quote:
Originally posted by Chris142: You guys seem to really like the multi-vis oils.
Hey, I use monograde a lot. Castrol Dino monograde.....HD-30. In this Forum, you will see people bitching and moaning about their multigrade, say 0w-40, shearing down to a lesser weight, like 0w-30. Well, with monograde, "shear-down" will never happen. You pay for 30-weight, and 30-weight is what you get at the end of your oil change interval.
 

Al

Messages
19,256
Location
Elizabethtown, Pa
Well a 30 wt at 68F is like a 5 or 10W-30 at about freezing. I think that as you drop below that 68 (approx #) with the straight oil- you will get more startup wear. That's merely a guess though. [Smile]
 
Messages
656
Location
Massachusetts
I ran straight 30w (I think mostly Valvoline) in my old 6.2L deisel. That truck had over 300k on it when I traded it in. I would have kept it for even longer, but the rest of the truck was really rusting out and I blew the rear axle. I think the starter was going too. Until the day I traded it, it ran smooth and powerful (well powerful for a 6.2!) and I use to run it on the highway with my foot to the floor!
 
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1,533
Location
Ephraim
quote:
Originally posted by crashz: I ran straight 30w (I think mostly Valvoline) in my old 6.2L deisel. That truck had over 300k on it when I traded it in. *-*-*-!
My Taco has 388K and all but the last 2K and the first 20-26K were STRAIGHT 30w
 
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3,377
Location
BC, Canada
With the new group II and II+ base oils, single mono-grades are far better than they used to be 5-10 years ago. The pour points are quite low and VIs are up. check out this single grade's specs: SAE 30 40C 83 100C 11.2 VI 123 Flash 480F/249C Pour P -36C/-33F SA 1.0 TBN 8.0 [ October 29, 2003, 07:16 AM: Message edited by: userfriendly ]
 
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5,928
Location
Waterloo, ON
I think if you know what you are doing, single grade oils are the way to go. i.e.: what grade to use at what temperature. Multi-grades were originally designed for people to use the same oil year round. Example: Average Joe Schmoe can change his oil in the late summer, and use the same 10W30 all winter long until the next oil change in spring. So it's like Grampa said; " use SAE #30, it'll never let you down" [ October 29, 2003, 08:45 AM: Message edited by: Bluestream ]
 
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1,533
Location
Ephraim
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Bluestream: [QB] I think if you know what you are doing, single grade oils are the way to go. ---***--- What about converting a single into a slight Multi?
 
Messages
94
Location
Seattle
Chris, sounds like a monograde should work great for that cornbinder. I use Kendall SAE 40 in my jetboat, I have tried many oils and even 20w50 doesn't maintain pressure or viscosity like good old 40, but then nothing cooks an oil like a jetboat.
 
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2,569
Location
College Dorm...
quote:
Originally posted by Kompressor: Chris, sounds like a monograde should work great for that cornbinder. I use Kendall SAE 40 in my jetboat, I have tried many oils and even 20w50 doesn't maintain pressure or viscosity like good old 40, but then nothing cooks an oil like a jetboat.
What would make a jetboat different than the typical sterndrive/inboard? Have you tried a HDEO 15w-40, such as Delo, Delvac, or Long-Life? I've seen several boats ran very hard with one of these oils and they have no problem maintaining pressure...
 
Messages
94
Location
Seattle
[/qb][/QUOTE]What would make a jetboat different than the typical sterndrive/inboard? Have you tried a HDEO 15w-40, such as Delo, Delvac, or Long-Life? I've seen several boats ran very hard with one of these oils and they have no problem maintaining pressure... [/QB][/QUOTE] The jet is a less efficient drive than any prop-drive and usually see full or near full throttle operation at all times, jets usually have more powerfull engines (more BTU) than the typical I/O runabout. However, with both drives at WOT with similar power (and rpm) they may not be too different, they both would be under a full load. From friends I know with I/O's, the oil viscosity is far less critical. I have not tried a 15w40 fleet oil, but I will next summer. I suspect it may be more viscosity stable than typical multi's, but I'll be surprised if it can hang with SAE 40 when the heat is on (oil pressure drops).
 
Messages
2,569
Location
College Dorm...
Obviously, its very-high temperature properties won't be as good, but definitely give the HDEO 15w-40's a try...think it can do the job and that you'll be impressed. I've ran all the big-name HDEO's in various machinery before, but I'll recommend Pennzoil Long-Life to you as I'm having a very good experience with it right now (First time I've ever used it before...Ran it because of info. from this site). [ October 30, 2003, 04:41 PM: Message edited by: Jelly ]
 
Messages
94
Location
Seattle
quote:
Originally posted by Jelly: Obviously, its very-high temperature properties won't be as good, but definitely give the HDEO 15w-40's a try...think it can do the job and that you'll be impressed. I've ran all the big-name HDEO's in various machinery before, but I'll recommend Pennzoil Long-Life to you as I'm having a very good experience with it right now (First time I've ever used it before...Ran it because of info. from this site).
I'm already impressed with HDEO's [Big Grin] , I used Delo in my old Cummins Dodge and now in the wife's Mercedes and our 454 motorhome. I think SAE 40 is better for the boat, but I want to see how HDEO will do. I'd like to compare a good dino HDEO like Pennz LL to Mobile D1 synth in that boat, it would be interesting to see what difference the vis stability is. I wanted to try Pennz LL too (also because of readings from this site), but they where out at Wally World last oil change and Napa wanted like $2.79 a Qaurt.
 
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