Taking apart aluminum windows to seal them

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570
Location
AZ
I bought the zipper pile weather stripping to reseal my 1979 windows. I've looked at a couple windows and I'm not sure how they come apart or come out of the slot to access the sealing tracks. Can anyone explain to me how this is done? YouTube seems to only show destroying the windows while removing them
 
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3,649
Location
Worst Case, Ontario
IIRC there is something in the track holding them, I have scapped quite a few of the windows you are speaking of and the one thing I recall is the weather stripping strip being difficult to remove even while scrapping the windows. The more I think about it I'll bet that the weather stripping is installed while the window is being assembled, and you can't really take them apart without destroying them. They have ninety degree steel Ls that provide the corner support of the window frame, and I think those are either crimped or riveted in. Sorry man, but those windows are worth more as scrap now-a-days. Replaced a lot of those during the 2000s.
 
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1,112
Location
midwest
If they are like my double hung windows you raise them a couple of inches, then pull the latches in away from the track then tip the top of the window inward you, then tilt the right or left side a little higher to get one side out of the balance. Does this make any sense?
 
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2,169
Location
Saskatchewan, Canada
Are we talking double~ or triple~ glazed aluminum / wood /vinyl framed house windows? If that's the case, they are gas sealed. Once the seal loses it's integrity or you dis-assemble them, you will never get the Nitrogen gas back in. As moisture cannot exist in a Nitrogen environment, it keeps them from frosting up on the inside. If you somehow repair / reseal the window, because the panes are now full of air, not Nitrogen, they will frost or weep moisture on the inside from that point onwards. Time for new windows. Triple-Glazed is the standard today; you might be able to get good still sealed double-glazed windows for free (just pick them up) as people are replacing them with Triple~ all the time. I can have all I want around here. If you can't afford new windows as a set, maybe you could afford one window at a time. The advantage there is you get to install same-sized units as they are essentially all custom sized anyway. The alternative is to buy custom sized windows that were not used or built to the wrong size as surplus or discount units. But you might end up spending more getting them to fit. Too big is a bad idea and too small for your opening only works if it's close side-to-side. Top to bottom they can be out (smaller) as it's just a bit of siding to re-install / remodel.
 
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15,574
Location
Upper Midwest
Originally Posted by Johnny2Bad
If that's the case, they are gas sealed. Once the seal loses it's integrity or you dis-assemble them, you will never get the Nitrogen gas back in. As moisture cannot exist in a Nitrogen environment, it keeps them from frosting up on the inside. If you somehow repair / reseal the window, because the panes are now full of air, not Nitrogen, they will frost or weep moisture on the inside from that point onwards.
That's completely not true. Water vapor can exist with or without any other gas, air is 78% nitrogen are you saying moisture cannot exist in air? It is possible to rebuild double pane windows but it isn't generally done because the inner surface of the glass is usually contaminated and cannot be cleaned. But when they first manufacture them they have air in the pocket which is replaced with a dry inert gas, usually argon or krypton. But better ones have a vacuum in the space. How do you think they get the air and moisture out when they make them?
 
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604
Location
Joplin
Originally Posted by gregk24
Our house still has the original 1959 wood frame windows, I'll be of no help.
And they probably aren't fallen apart yet like the windows made 25 years later. This example is an Anderson double pane.

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leroyd92

Thread starter
Messages
570
Location
AZ
Thank you for the tips everyone. Replacing windows is out of the question. Between wife and I both having surgery this year and having a toddler, there's way more important priorities then to update windows. I just looked at my biggest offender, ripped out the old sealer with a scribe, and slid in a new piece. I'm pretty confident between scribes,picks, and seal spoons, I'll be able to reseal them.
 
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6,883
Location
FL, USA
Originally Posted by Cressida
Originally Posted by gregk24
Our house still has the original 1959 wood frame windows, I'll be of no help.
And they probably aren't fallen apart yet like the windows made 25 years later. This example is an Anderson double pane.
Thankfully, they are holding up alright. Thats a bummer for sure! Some say you recoup your spending on energy savings by "upgrading" from single, to double pane windows. I find that hard to believe, it seems modern windows break or loose seal in 15-20 years. It cost A LOT to put new windows in, and that expense every 15-20 years would seem to be a whole lot more than slightly higher electric bill each month.
 

leroyd92

Thread starter
Messages
570
Location
AZ
I don't feel there's any gain for my area. We only run the AC for 3 months. And need warmth for maybe 2 months. The rest of the year is running swamp cooler or nothing. If all my windows lose the 1/8 Gap they have around them, my $19 will pay for itself instantly...
 
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